British English vs. US English. Suit vs. tuxedo.


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Thread: British English vs. US English. Suit vs. tuxedo.

  1. #1

    British English vs. US English. Suit vs. tuxedo.

    In British English we say 'suit'. US Engish says 'tuxedo'.
    Would an American usually recognise suit as meaning tuxedo?
    Also, would an American generally recognise 'suited' as meaning 'wearing a suit' (or tuxedo)?

  2. #2
    A suit isn't a tuxedo.

    A tie is worn with a suit; a bowtie is worn with a tuxedo.

    In U.K. English, a tuxedo is called a dinner jacket.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam View Post
    A suit isn't a tuxedo.

    A tie is worn with a suit; a bowtie is worn with a tuxedo.

    In U.K. English, a tuxedo is called a dinner jacket.
    Thanks. I hadn't appreciated the distinction.

    So, would 'suit' and 'suited' be recognised in both versions as referring to a jacket, a tie, and trousers (pants)?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam View Post
    A suit isn't a tuxedo.

    A tie is worn with a suit; a bowtie is worn with a tuxedo.

    In U.K. English, a tuxedo is called a dinner jacket.
    I didn't know that. Thanks!

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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Istine
    Thanks. I hadn't appreciated the distinction.

    So, would 'suit' and 'suited' be recognised in both versions as referring to a jacket, a tie, and trousers (pants)?


    Yep.

    Even the television series Suits, an American show, is named after the sometimes-derogatory name for lawyers -- so-called because they wear suits for a large part of their time.
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    "One morning I shot an elephant in my pyjamas. How he got into my pyjamas I'll never know." ~ Groucho Marx.

    "It is better to be feared than loved, if one cannot be both". ~ Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince.

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer". ~ Bruce Lee.

    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert's mind there are few". ~ Shunryu Suzuki.

    "Give a man a mask and he will show you his true face". ~ Oscar Wilde.

    "He who learns but does not think is lost; he who thinks but does not learn is in great danger". ~ Confucius.

  6. #6
    Member Sonata's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Istine View Post

    So, would 'suit' and 'suited' be recognised in both versions as referring to a jacket, a tie, and trousers (pants)?
    A woman's matching jacket and skirt [or matching jacket and trousers] is also called a suit. Smart or casual they are still called suits.
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  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam View Post
    A suit isn't a tuxedo.

    A tie is worn with a suit; a bowtie is worn with a tuxedo.

    In U.K. English, a tuxedo is called a dinner jacket.

    This is a little simplistic. Bill Nye wears bowties with his suits.

    James Bond at a dinner party, from the one or two movies I've seen, wears a tuxedo. Everything matches.

    Suits have matching pants and jacket, but the tie or bowtie is personal preference (doesn't match).

    "Suited", I doubt, would mean "wearing a tuxedo" to an American.


    I would post pictures, but haven't learned how to do that.

    Hope this helps.

  8. #8
    The point is: suit and tuxedo are not the same.

    A tuxedo is called a dinner jacket in U.K. English.

    A suit is called a suit in U.K. and U.S. English.
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    "One morning I shot an elephant in my pyjamas. How he got into my pyjamas I'll never know." ~ Groucho Marx.

    "It is better to be feared than loved, if one cannot be both". ~ Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince.

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer". ~ Bruce Lee.

    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert's mind there are few". ~ Shunryu Suzuki.

    "Give a man a mask and he will show you his true face". ~ Oscar Wilde.

    "He who learns but does not think is lost; he who thinks but does not learn is in great danger". ~ Confucius.

  9. #9
    And David Cameron's mother would say, "Wear a proper suit, pull up your tie, and sing the national anthem."


  10. #10
    I learned something new today: Generally, tuxedos have satin, while suits do not.

    http://www.mytuxedocatalog.com/blog/...do-and-a-suit/

    And yes, American readers will most likely be familiar with both terms—to a basic degree, at least. They might not know the technical difference between the two, but the average American has both suit and tuxedo in their vocabulary.

    P.S. "Dinner jacket" is a term that I, as an American (now living in a Canada) don't really use. "Blazer" is more common, to me.

    And don't forget sport coats and sport jackets and smoking jackets and life jackets and straight jackets, and . . . and . . .

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