British English vs. US English. Suit vs. tuxedo. - Page 2


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Thread: British English vs. US English. Suit vs. tuxedo.

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of all trades View Post
    "Suited", I doubt, would mean "wearing a tuxedo" to an American.
    As it's not specifically for an American audience (though the majority who read it will likely be American), I'm going to take a small gamble on 'suited' - it's not a reference to a tuxedo. It's poetry and I quite like a little ambiguity in verse, so I will place some reliance on the reader understanding that 'suited' does not mean 'well-matched' in this instance. The context will also be a big clue.
    Thank you.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyle R View Post
    P.S. "Dinner jacket" is a term that I, as an American (now living in a Canada) don't really use. "Blazer" is more common, to me.
    It's already been said that "dinner jacket" = "tuxedo". Or have I misunderstood?

    Also, to me, "blazer", "sport coat", and "sport jacket" are all interchangeable.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Istine View Post
    As it's not specifically for an American audience (though the majority who read it will likely be American), I'm going to take a small gamble on 'suited' - it's not a reference to a tuxedo. It's poetry and I quite like a little ambiguity in verse, so I will place some reliance on the reader understanding that 'suited' does not mean 'well-matched' in this instance. The context will also be a big clue.
    Thank you.
    You're welcome.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of all trades View Post
    Also, to me, "blazer", "sport coat", and "sport jacket" are all interchangeable.
    In the UK they are not, well at least not in the era I was brought up in.

    ETA: Check out
    Men's Style Guide - The Blazer
    (Historical Background)







  5. #15
    In America, if I asked you to show me your knickers you might ask if we were going to play golf.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    In the UK they are not, well at least not in the era I was brought up in.

    ETA: Check out
    Men's Style Guide - The Blazer
    (Historical Background)
    In my era it was what we wore to school, I think of it as the sort of jacket you would put a badge on the pocket of, not just as worn by schoolboys, but also people like members of the British Legion, or that boating club in PiP's link.

    In England, Kevin women wear knickers, men wear pants, over the top of their pants men wear trousers, or if they finish above the knee, shorts; confusing.
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  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Istine View Post
    In British English we say 'suit'. US Engish says 'tuxedo'.
    Would an American usually recognise suit as meaning tuxedo?
    Also, would an American generally recognise 'suited' as meaning 'wearing a suit' (or tuxedo)?
    To us Yanks, this is a suit:


  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam View Post
    [/COLOR]

    Yep.

    Even the television series Suits, an American show, is named after the sometimes-derogatory name for lawyers -- so-called because they wear suits for a large part of their time.
    One of my favorite tv shows. Be glad when the next season starts.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack of all trades View Post
    This is a little simplistic. Bill Nye wears bowties with his suits.

    James Bond at a dinner party, from the one or two movies I've seen, wears a tuxedo. Everything matches.

    Suits have matching pants and jacket, but the tie or bowtie is personal preference (doesn't match).

    "Suited", I doubt, would mean "wearing a tuxedo" to an American.


    I would post pictures, but haven't learned how to do that.

    Hope this helps.
    A common meaning in American for "suited" is appropriate or apt.

  10. #20
    Member Reichelina's Avatar
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    But then again, isn't a tuxedo, a type of suit?
    Coat and tie... Stuff..... Hahaha.

    Just wear pajamas! Haha.

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    and he that increaseth knowledge increaseth sorrow.

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