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Thread: More moist vs moister

  1. #11
    humid 1. [hyoo-mid or, often, yoo-] adjective

    containing a high amount of water or water vapor; noticeably moist: humid air; a humid climate.
    There is nothing in the definition that states how it feels to humans.



    100% humidity is either rain or fog.

    Must it be raining when the humidity reaches 100%?
    -IRI/ LDEO Climate Data Library iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu/.../humidity.html

    It just means that the air is holding as much moisture as it can at a given temperature, in the form of water vapor, which is an invisible gas. However, near 100% relative humidity, you can get water vapor condensing into very small water droplets to form clouds, including fog near the surface.

  2. #12
    Member Glhadiator's Avatar
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    Lisa was busy making lunch when she noticed changes in the atmosphere. It was cooler and more moist.

    Lisa said “Robin. I think we better have our lunch inside. Rain is coming.”
    Sometimes the correct written word doesn't sound 'right' when spoken. In such cases I just rewrite till it sounds right.

    Lisa was busy making lunch. A cold, wet breeze brushed her face. Pausing, she looked up and noticed the air was misty.

    Lisa said “Robin. I think we better have our lunch inside. Rain is coming.”

  3. #13
    Member Sonata's Avatar
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    I do not think "A cold, wet breeze" sounds right, as if it was wet it would already be raining. I would say

    Lisa was busy making lunch. A cold, damp breeze brushed her face. Pausing, she looked up and noticed the air was misty.

    Lisa said “Robin. I think we better have our lunch inside. Rain is coming.”
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  4. #14
    Member Glhadiator's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sonata View Post
    I do not think "A cold, wet breeze" sounds right, as if it was wet it would already be raining. I would say

    Merely a suggestion. But I do like your substitution of wet with damp. Nicely done.

    I hope I get the chance to read the completed story.

  5. #15
    Member Radrook's Avatar
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    Whether it is grammatically correct or not, if a word draws too much attention to itself due to being unusual, or grammatically controversial, then it is distracting the reader from the subject-matter by causing a pause and ponder. So based on that alone a word should automatically be replaced. Unless of course our intention isn't to distract the reader but to draw attention to the word for some relevant purpose.

  6. #16
    There is no such word.

    It is "more moist".
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  7. #17
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  8. #18
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    Damn me for being from the English Colonies

    it is moist outside. Depending which part of our country that varies from a few spits on a summers day to torrential rain as a gross understatement.

    it is getting moist outside is a valid saying here as is it is not as moist as it was earlier

    to me and again culture underpins things here

    moist is a state not necessarily an absolute state but, therefore its approaching or retreating from being moist rather than two times moist is moister. The moister dog does not hunt in these part

    final example. "Its getting moist out. Do you want to run the dog ?

    No mate it is a bit too wet now. Lets look at it a bit later"
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