'Any' as a Pronoun - Sometimes Singular and Sometimes Plural - Page 2


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Thread: 'Any' as a Pronoun - Sometimes Singular and Sometimes Plural

  1. #11
    Member RhythmOvPain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cran View Post
    Sorry, what? Where did this ... interesting ... interpretation come from?
    Those whom the gods detest?
    For whom the bell tolls?
    Whom should I fear?

    About the only thing that comes to mind referencing more than one person with the word who is "we who are about to die..." and that comes from a modern interpretation of first century Roman.

    I mean I'm not a genius, but it only makes sense that the word "whom" would be used as plural over "who" if only because there's more letters in it.
    My favorite word in the English language is "shenanigans." My favorite thing to do is cause them.

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  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by RhythmOvPain View Post
    Those whom the gods detest?
    For whom the bell tolls?
    Whom should I fear?
    What do these have in common? No, not some numeric value; the whom in two of them can be taken as singular or plural. (Ask not for whom the bell tolls, old son; it tolls for thee).

    All three are examples of whom being used as the objective pronoun. So, you have successfully illustrated what I was getting at. The other thing they have in common is that, for lyrical impact, they are all rearranged from the standard (or basic) sentence structure which is: subject/verb/object. Each is set down as object/subject/verb.

    The gods detest whom?
    The bell tolls for whom?
    Should I fear whom? (which could also be arranged as I should fear whom?)

    Curiously, and why it's funny, is that these days, people are less likely to treat the questions as subject/verb/object and more likely to consider them as subject1/verb/subject2 -

    The gods detest who?
    The bell tolls for who?
    Should I fear who? (which would more likely be arranged as I should fear who?)



    About the only thing that comes to mind referencing more than one person with the word who is "we who are about to die..." and that comes from a modern interpretation of first century Roman.

    I mean I'm not a genius, but it only makes sense that the word "whom" would be used as plural over "who" if only because there's more letters in it.
    I'm sorry, but no. In this reference, the who is a subjective pronoun relative to the verb to die - they are doing the dying, the dying is not being done to them.

    Singular and individual have more letters than plural, group, or mob.
    Last edited by Cran; January 29th, 2016 at 09:51 PM.
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  3. #13
    Member RhythmOvPain's Avatar
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    Which is why I'd sooner say screw it and re-word it.

    Srsly, there so many easier ways to convey a message. >>
    My favorite word in the English language is "shenanigans." My favorite thing to do is cause them.

    Smoke weed everyday.

  4. #14
    Lots of interesting posts and advice in this thread. For the who/whom thing, I tend to follow what's on here:

    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/words/who-or-whom

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