What sound does running water make?

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  1. #1

    What sound does running water make?

    Im writing a bath scene like a dance, a poem. Focusing on the way the water moves. Its rhythm. The narrative needs music, so I am trying to create the background melody of the taps running. The sound of water on water......what noise would that make? HELP!!!!!

  2. #2
    The taps running in the bath?

    Going by memory:

    Depending on the flow, it makes a pitter-patter like varying slaps.

    A heavy flow still makes that slapping sound, but also a deeper sound, closer to a rumble. Especially if you duck your head down and listen to it...

    For research though: Why not take a bath?
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  3. #3
    After the tub is partially full and the water is falling on water: um-ess, um-ess, um-ess, um-ess, um-ess, um-ess, um-ess. Kind of runs together.
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  4. #4
    jenH.. check out Onomatopeia .. a type of poetry that uses words to convey sound.. .. there are some fabulous examples of words you can use.. Hope this helps...
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Crowley K. Jarvis View Post
    The taps running in the bath?

    Going by memory:

    Depending on the flow, it makes a pitter-patter like varying slaps.

    A heavy flow still makes that slapping sound, but also a deeper sound, closer to a rumble. Especially if you duck your head down and listen to it...

    For research though: Why not take a bath?
    I am currently standing by my running taps, trying to put it into words...and failing

  6. #6
    sorry, I spelled that wrong.. it is Onomatopoeia...
    Check out the exciting Poetry Hill !!

    If you are a writer, reach a reader
    If you are a fighter, teach a leader
    If you are a lover, touch a leper
    If this has helped you, thank you, reader

    If you can read this, teach a thinker

    Author: Lynn Loschky



    Death leaves a heartache no one can heal,
    love leaves a memory no one can steal....
    Author unknown.

  7. #7
    And it isn't a type of poetry but a poetic device. It's a word that sounds like the sound of what it's describing. Hum, pow, pop, boom, hiss, and murmur are all onomatopoeia.

    For running water the word murmur can be used, especially if you're talking about the sound of a slow-moving brook or stream.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Firemajic View Post
    sorry, I spelled that wrong.. it is Onomatopoeia...
    Hi thanks I had already looked into the Onomatopoeia dictionary - there doesnt seem to be a word that conveys the right sound...hmmm. its a tough one!

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by JenHLewis View Post
    Hi thanks I had already looked into the Onomatopoeia dictionary - there doesnt seem to be a word that conveys the right sound...hmmm. its a tough one!
    Why not compare it to a sound a reader recognises? I'm just running a bath and it sounds like Niagara Falls.


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  10. #10
    It depends how much air the taps allow to mix with the falling water. A large amount of air gives rise to higher pitched hissing while very little air results in the lower frequencies from the impact of water on water dominating. I would describe the latter sound as "urbling" in that the water goes "urble, ubrle, urble." Using an artificial word like this suggests that the sound is something like burbling but in some way different. You can leave it up to the reader's imagination to determine how it differs. Always take advantage of the reader's imagination as well as your own. If they haven't any then they may dive for their dictionary and be disappointed that the word isn't explained anywhere of course.
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