So what do we actually call this thing?

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Thread: So what do we actually call this thing?

  1. #1
    WF Veteran Riis Marshall's Avatar
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    So what do we actually call this thing?

    Hello Folks

    When a chapter section ends at the bottom or top of a page, instead of a blank line we insert a character, usually an asterisk but sometimes something a little more curly. Is there an official name for this thing in publishers' house style guides or do we just call it that curly thing at the bottom or top of the page?

    Thanks in advance.

    All the best with your writing.

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    Riis
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  2. #2
    The curvy thing you're describing wouldn't be a tilde would it? As far as the generic, I call them all section breaks.
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. Steven Wright

  3. #3
    Member MzSnowleopard's Avatar
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    ~ is also sometimes called a "twiddle" or a "squiggle"
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  4. #4
    WF Veteran Riis Marshall's Avatar
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    Hello Folks

    Thanks for your help so far, but I can't see Harper Collins or Random House calling it a 'twiddle' or a 'squiggle' in their style guides. And what we used to call a tilde looks like this: ^, I think.

    All the best with your writing.

    Warmest regards
    Riis
    All writing is practise for the writing that follows.
    If it jams, force it; if it breaks, it needed replacing anyhow.
    If you like intelligent contemporary conspiracy thrillers, you may want to check out The Bureau of Happiness
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  5. #5
    I call ^ a caret. Me and the internets call ~ a tilde.
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. Steven Wright

  6. #6
    Member MzSnowleopard's Avatar
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    I googled the word tilde and that's what I got. :: shrug ::
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  7. #7
    I'd call it a tilde. I may be wrong.
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  8. #8
    WF Veteran Riis Marshall's Avatar
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    Hello Folks

    Sorry - it's been a long, long time. You're right, folks, according to my research (to supplement the memory that's almost gone): '^' is a caret and '~' is a tilde.

    I guess we could use a tilde at the bottom of the page, but suppose I decide to use a '§' or something else?

    All the best with your writing.

    Warmest regards
    Riis
    All writing is practise for the writing that follows.
    If it jams, force it; if it breaks, it needed replacing anyhow.
    If you like intelligent contemporary conspiracy thrillers, you may want to check out The Bureau of Happiness
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  9. #9
    Yes, caret and tilde are the terms I would use too. I haven't used them in English as such though.
    The only times I've used the caret is in maths to denote indices (power of) and I've only used the tilde when attempting to write Spanish (makes the n sound like ny).

  10. #10
    The closest thing I can find to a name for a graphical section break is a 'section break mark'. The word 'dinkus' is often used also, although dinkus technically refers to the use of three asterisks (***). I've used asterisks, the number symbol (#), dashes, and, when formatting one of my books for self-publishing, I used the antagonist's initials - AG - (his name was part of the book's title).
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