Work I need to do


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Thread: Work I need to do

  1. #1
    Member McJibbles's Avatar
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    Work I need to do

    Hi there.
    You probably don't want to read this.


    WF has consumed my life and the tablet that I use to access the site. I have a metric shit tonne of over the summer assignments I haven't done. Most of them pertain to literature. I have no program like microsoft word. If you are yet to draw an inference, I'm going to use this forum like my own personal software, just with multiple personalities who might occasionally give me advice. I don't care if you do or don't, just remember, I'm workin here.





    Chapter 1

    Quester:

    Guy Montag, a "fire-fighter", who begins to take an interest in that which he once mindlessly destroyed: Books.

    Place to Go: Montag needs to escape the society he is currently a part of. He flees from the city to avoid retribution from a pro-bookburning government seeking to execute him.

    Stated Reason: To save his life and discover more about the books he has been protecting.

    Challenges and Trials: Montag confronts his mindless wife and her friends who have lost their minds (television zombies), overcomes his prying, evil boss the fire chief (villain), and escapes the Hound (dragon), an mechanical executor. He is inspired not only by preservation of the wisdom and beauty of literature (holy grail) but by the inspiration of the young woman in the beginning of the novel (damsel in distress).

    Real Reason to go: Montag leaves the city and his comfortable life as a firefighter to break up the illusion that he is happy into a thousand little pieces. His life is miserable, and he needs to go on this journey to realize what it means to be a happy individual even if you are pitted against society.
    If you can dream---and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think---and not make thoughts your aim,
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same
    "The English language, you fornicator of matriarchs! Dost thou speak it?"
    Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.


  2. #2
    You're on the right track.
    Last edited by Pluralized; August 6th, 2015 at 01:05 PM. Reason: Mis-placed humor, sorry.
    It all starts with a name and flows from there. A ridiculous moniker springs to mind and it launches like a multi-lubed slippery-sloop down chutes made of buttery-floops. Down, down, down. We watch, spellbound. Rapturous. Glockenspiel. We do our due diligence with penitence and penicillin. Do what’s due, then dew drops on your moon-pops.


  3. #3
    Member McJibbles's Avatar
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    Chapter 5:

    Intertextuality can best be described as the idea of interrelated literature, or the concept that all stories are connected and in fact one story (Foster). If something from a piece of literature strikes you as familiar, as allusion, or even stolen from an earlier piece, it probably was. Nothing is truly original, and all writing depends on the writers of the past, while at the same time building a platform for writers of the future. The process is simple. Read, and be influenced by the ideas of your predecessors and translate a bit of them along to the next generation.

    An easy example is dystopian fiction. One of my personal favorites, Brave New World, has a main character named John who reflects an iconoclastic view to the society in which he lives. After a battle to alter the characteristics of that flawed society (unsuccessfully in this case) a tragedy befalls him, in this case his exile and suicide. The next dystopian novel on the list is the Hunger Games in which Katniss Everdeen rebels against the Capitol and ultimately experiences tragedy in her fight against the corrupt government. By the time I read 1984, George Wilson vaguely resembled every discontented dystopian i had ever seen. After his brief struggle with Big Brother and the thought police, he too met with calamity. Perhaps the oldest ancestor of these dystopias are the martyrs of the Bible, spreading word of change in their communities and being executed for the deed.
    If you can dream---and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think---and not make thoughts your aim,
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same
    "The English language, you fornicator of matriarchs! Dost thou speak it?"
    Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.


  4. #4
    Member McJibbles's Avatar
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    At least I'm not a fat man.

    I'm a dude, dude.
    If you can dream---and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think---and not make thoughts your aim,
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same
    "The English language, you fornicator of matriarchs! Dost thou speak it?"
    Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.


  5. #5
    Member McJibbles's Avatar
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    Chapter 6

    The Bible is interwoven into nearly every work of literature in some way, sometimes unintentionally. In the case of James Joyce's Araby, the subtle biblical illusions are deliberate albeit elusive. The allusion Foster spotted by relating the two jars to the angelic guardians of the Garden of Eden is only one of many. One can establish a parallel to the narrator's description of the girl's brown figure to that of the Song of Solomon, a book of poetry that has a large focus On the features of the two lovers. I see a similarity in the behaviors of the boy and the behaviors of an earlier Judean king as well: David. He watches his crush on the street with a longing and temptation similar to the great king's admiration of Bathsheba, and the metaphor of the harp also brings David's adventures to mind.
    If you can dream---and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think---and not make thoughts your aim,
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same
    "The English language, you fornicator of matriarchs! Dost thou speak it?"
    Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.


  6. #6
    Member McJibbles's Avatar
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    Chapter 10:

    In Frankenstein, the weather serves as much more than just a setting. The very mood of the characters in their various situations and consequently the mood of the reader is heavily impacted by Shelley's choice of weather. In the beginning of the story, Frankenstein's happy childhood seems to be permeated only by eternal sunshine and happiness. The descriptions of his life feel PollyAnna and horribly boring. In the darker and ultimately more interesting parts of the story, harsh wind and snow and shattering ice floes have many different uses. They symbolize the peril and breakdown of Frankenstein's life and sanity, evoke feelings of darkness, the cold, and helplessness and define our sense of the monster as an unconquerable foe like a long and brutal winter.
    If you can dream---and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think---and not make thoughts your aim,
    If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same
    "The English language, you fornicator of matriarchs! Dost thou speak it?"
    Iron sharpeneth iron; so a man sharpeneth the countenance of his friend.


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