Scrivner? Whatever


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Thread: Scrivner? Whatever

  1. #1
    WF Veteran Riis Marshall's Avatar
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    Scrivner? Whatever

    Hello Folks

    Promise not to laugh, please.

    I work in Microsoft Word 2002. I think it's just fine for me. I can even ignore the wiggly red and green monsters (I've actually come a long way: in 1997 I completed a 220,000 word management book, complete with loads of footnotes and a substantial index on AmiPro. Imagine that!). And that beats by a long shot the Royal portable I used when I started writing (we won't even think about that one).

    But I digress. What writing programs do you nice folks use for your work? The one that comes to mind without my doing any research is Scrivner. I assume there are at least several more with similar features.

    Thus my question comes down to something like: what, precisely, am I going to get using Scrivner or any other program specifically designed for writers that I don't have with my old reliable Word?

    My question isn't based on scepticism or some sort of feeling things were better in the old days, I'm just curious about what might be out there that would be better than what I'm using now.

    Thanks in advance.

    All the best with your writing.

    Warmest regards
    Riis
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  2. #2
    Word 95 when I started writing, and Word 2013 as of right now.

    I pretty much worked my way through every version of Word over the last twenty years, excluding Word 98.
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  3. #3
    I'm using Word 2007. It works great for me.
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  4. #4
    Member stevesh's Avatar
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    Wordpad. It's free. I guess Scrivner is good for stuff other than actual writing, like project and file management, but my writing needs are pretty simple.

  5. #5
    If you have something that works, I wouldn't change it.

    I use Scrivner some (along with Pages), and it's particularly a help to me at the organizational stage. It's a powerful tool, but mostly it does things Word can do, only in a fashion that makes more sense to me than the Microsoft implementation. I don't care to learn how to use all of Word's features, as I already know how do those things in the tools I use. I wouldn't recommend learning another way of doing it if Word works for you, though.
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  6. #6
    WF Veteran Riis Marshall's Avatar
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    Hello Folks

    Thanks for all your comments.

    I don't do much in the way of file management other than I set each chapter up as a separate file just to keep the files smaller. About the only problem with this is if I decide, for example, to change a character's name, I need to go back to every separate file and change it (either that or wait until I've assembled all the chapters into one file).

    It seems to work okay for me.

    All the best with your writing.

    Warmest regards
    Riis
    All writing is practise for the writing that follows.
    If it jams, force it; if it breaks, it needed replacing anyhow.
    If you like intelligent contemporary conspiracy thrillers, you may want to check out The Bureau of Happiness
    Hidden Content

  7. #7
    I can tell you what I do to keep everything organized. I use excel for my notes and for my characters. I also use it to make notes on future chapters. I also set up as many chapters as possible on word so I don't have to keep scrolling down when I start another writing session. I just click on the chapter I'm working on in the table of contents and I'm there. Anyway that's what works for me.
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  8. #8
    Scrivener is a marvelous writing tool, offering many functions that Word/Whatever either don't do, or are cumbersome (imo). You can keep a master Scrivener file and have separate stories organized as separate documents within the same master file, organized in folders and such. In this way, you can have (for instance) a 2015 Short Stories file, and inside it keep all your stories organized as separate documents. Makes it easy to stay up with all your work if you have lots. It keeps your individual documents organized very well. Some can do this within Word but you have to open separate files that way which I think is inefficient.

    Writing a novel? Scrivener keeps everything organized in such a way you can storyboard your excerpts and decide how you want chapters organized and configured so you can change things up very easily without getting lost. It gives you word counts per document, or for the overall project. There are name generators (really powerful ones), you can save your research as entire web pages, and keep all your stuff in a very logical layout. The compose function (where you write) can be made full screen and is beautiful. Many fonts and word-processing options also.

    I find Scrivener to be a very helpful tool, intuitive, and well designed. Almost like they designed it for writers! Here's a screenshot...
    Attachment 8743
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  9. #9
    Scrivener lets you write a book scene by scene and chapter by chapter. In Word it's one big document, but in Scrivener it's a folder with multiples documents. You can put your research on there and notes. You can view your novel secenes on a corkboard with notecards and that allows you to move your scenes around (I'm sure people do this offline).
    I started using it and bought it was I was doing NaNoWrimo because it's easier to just write scenes that are not in order and to keep eveything in one place. Then you can put it all together into Word if you want. You can create templates for things like a character profile. There's a lot on there. I still use Word for short stories but I don't know why as you can do it on Scrivener.
    It's worth a free trial to see what works for you. I just find that with Word you have to write in a linear fashion and it does not help you to be organised. Scrivener does. Check out the videos on their website it's quite good

  10. #10
    If you always always save your work after each session, keep using word- never trust it to pull through for you, I've lost whole chapters that way- even using the modern, cloud-backed version, if even one of the programs that helps back it up goes awry, you're in danger and it may not even tell you.

    I changed to scrivener in the middle of my seventh novel, and I'm loving it- also it's just $20 which is better than word. I'd definitely consider it.

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