[Health] Do you smoke? - Page 8


Poll: Do you smoke?

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Thread: [Health] Do you smoke?

  1. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by PiP View Post
    Hi Dale. I would not object if some restaurants allowed smoking It's just before the ban I had no choice whether I was forced to inhale smoke whilst I was eating. Can you understand what I'm saying? Smokers would light up on the table next to me and then rather than smoke the cigarette they would hold it in the 'pose' position while they chatted. The smoke would then drift across my meal while I was eating.

    I'm all for compromise.

    I realise there are various POVs whether passive smoking can cause cancer but personally I'd rather not taking the risk.
    i remember when i was a kid, things were like that. with smoking sections and non-smoking sections side by side eachother.
    but by the time they passed the smoking ban here, the restaurants and bars had already became either total non-smoking or
    total smoking. so there wasn't really a point in the law being passed, especially considering that most places were non-smoking.
    we have 1 smoking bar in this city now. i don't know how they get away with it. i think they just decided...."hey. we're going to
    be the the only smoking bar in this city and we'll just pay the fines." or maybe they pay the cops kickbacks. i don't know. it's
    my favorite bar, though. lol
    "Man, you should have seen them kicking Edgar Allan Poe.”

  2. #72
    I might like to enjoy a good cigar with a glass of single malt scotch (though I'm not allowed anymore), but when I go to a restaurant I do so to enjoy the food, untainted If I couldn't then I wouldn't go to a restaurant, so it's the economics of an overall shift in perspectives that's an overriding impetus, not any individual taste.

    There are so many narrow topics that we subjective beings belabor, that it gets to be rather humorous. Take for instance that we go to such great lengths to destroy germs, and are in effect worsening our situation. Over ninety percent of the cells in and on our body aren''t human cells, but are very beneficial in keeping us healthy. Yet in manically declaring war on them, are actually building up resistance in the few that are harmful.

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  3. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by dale View Post
    the so called "dangers" of second hand smoke have been extremely over-inflated anyway.....

    http://www.davehitt.com/facts/epa.html
    That was an interesting read thank you Dale.
    It appears to be a classic case of manipulating results by carefully choosing the sources of the statistics. I believe it would be much fairer perhaps to have maybe 30 sources and knock off the three at either extreme to hopefully eliminate the more poorly conducted questionaires.
    I do note though that the page was fairly narrow in its subject matter, focusing on lung cancer caused by second hand smoke. I suppose it did allude to other problems to by asserting that passive smoking is the equivalent of a very low amount of direct smoking.
    Either way, I dislike being in a smoky atmosphere whether or not it is significantly harmful.


  4. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by dale View Post
    the so called "dangers" of second hand smoke have been extremely over-inflated anyway.....

    http://www.davehitt.com/facts/epa.html
    This article lost my interest (and any sense of credibility) as soon as he claimed that lung cancer is a rare disease. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US (160,000/ year, 27% of all cancer related deaths). That can't be considered rare. Why should I trust any other point he tries to make?
    “Fools” said I, “You do not know
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    But my words like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed in the wells of silence : Simon & Garfunkel


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  5. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry D View Post
    This article lost my interest (and any sense of credibility) as soon as he claimed that lung cancer is a rare disease. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the US (160,000/ year, 27% of all cancer related deaths). That can't be considered rare. Why should I trust any other point he tries to make?
    i can actually drum up an actual court ruling which ruled that the epa falsified their info, if you want. it's the phillip morris case.
    the EPA exaggerated everything for an agenda, and a federal court ruled they did in fact do that.
    "Man, you should have seen them kicking Edgar Allan Poe.”

  6. #76
    basically, saying a kid is going to get a lung disease from being around a parent that smokes is like saying a person is gonna
    get blown up by a bomb just by walking past a group of muslims.
    "Man, you should have seen them kicking Edgar Allan Poe.”

  7. #77
    Member walker's Avatar
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    Ex-smoker here. It's been more than twenty years now. My father smoked heavily (which I didn't like as a kid, apparently), and also I'm from the generation with not only the friendly smiling cigarette pitchmen, often on TV, but also the candy cigarettes. They were bubble gum. I used to buy them all the time.

    Smoking is dangerous, no question about it. It increases your odds of health problems, but doesn't guarantee them. However, even if you get away with smoking for a long time with no apparent ill health effects, that doesn't prove anything. You can drive drunk for fifty years without killing anybody too, but you can't leap from there to an argument that it isn't dangerous to drive drunk. The evidence against smoking is too voluminous to ignore. Ignoring this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the studies, and how science itself works. You study a large group of smokers, and a large group of non-smokers, and some higher percentage of the smokers suffer ill health effects. That implies that some number of smokers do not suffer ill health effects. That is not a "Eureka!" moment, that you can point to and claim that smoking isn't harmful; it is consistent with, and trumped by, a higher percentage of smokers suffering ill health effects.

    A couple of years ago my wife and I spent a month or so heavily involved with end-of-life care for her sister, who had lung cancer. She was not a smoker, but worked in the basement of a dusty library for thirty years, which probably had something to do with it. The experience forever changed how I look at cancer. It's definitely not something to be taken lightly. Even though I knew people who had died of cancer before, I had never been through the process of seeing the body disintegrate and stop working, in often very unpleasant ways. So, I guess I'm not in favor of anybody blowing smoke in my face in restaurants. One of the reasons that I quit was that I already knew this, and sort of ostracized myself whenever I wanted to smoke, often outside in the cold. It just wasn't fun anymore.

  8. #78
    I'm not a fan of smoking. Inhaling smoke just doesn't seem wise to me. I also dislike inhaling the pollution that smokers exhale, so I do my best to avoid people when they are smoking (or hold my breath while passing them, if I can't avoid them).

    I've always wondered about the rationalizations smokers make.

    Is it:

    A) They believe cigarette smoke is not unhealthy?

    B) They believe cigarette smoke is unhealthy, but only in higher dosages/frequencies than what they expose themselves (and sometimes others) to?

    C) They believe cigarette smoke is unhealthy at the dosages/frequencies that they expose themselves (and sometimes others) to, but they don't care?

    D) Something else entirely?

    From the late Backward OX:

    Quote Originally Posted by The Backward OX
    Trying is Lying.

    There is no Try, there is only Do.

    There is only ONE WAY to STOP smoking, and that is to STOP.

    Anything else is a sham and a pretence.

    ‘“Look at me; I’m trying to stop smoking.” Lights another one. “This is only my fourth, today. Isn’t that great?”’

    And if you don’t stop, you’ll finish up just like me:

    I have emphysema, bronchiectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pleural effusion, a collapsed lung, and LUNG CANCER. All from smoking, which I stopped in 1995. The cancer is killing me. I’ve stopped eating solid food, as a result of which my weight has dropped by about 25% (to visualise me then and now, think of a modern-day Laurel & Hardy - or should that be Hardy and Laurel?), I have a more or less constant cough, my energy levels are such I can barely walk unassisted and sometimes I even lack the strength to lift a soup spoon, and I am almost permanently constipated.

    Smoking was fun when I was young.
    (#5)
    Last edited by Kyle R; June 4th, 2015 at 10:20 PM.

  9. #79
    Quote Originally Posted by walker View Post
    Ex-smoker here. It's been more than twenty years now. My father smoked heavily (which I didn't like as a kid, apparently), and also I'm from the generation with not only the friendly smiling cigarette pitchmen, often on TV, but also the candy cigarettes. They were bubble gum. I used to buy them all the time.

    Smoking is dangerous, no question about it. It increases your odds of health problems, but doesn't guarantee them. However, even if you get away with smoking for a long time with no apparent ill health effects, that doesn't prove anything. You can drive drunk for fifty years without killing anybody too, but you can't leap from there to an argument that it isn't dangerous to drive drunk. The evidence against smoking is too voluminous to ignore. Ignoring this is a fundamental misunderstanding of the studies, and how science itself works. You study a large group of smokers, and a large group of non-smokers, and some higher percentage of the smokers suffer ill health effects. That implies that some number of smokers do not suffer ill health effects. That is not a "Eureka!" moment, that you can point to and claim that smoking isn't harmful; it is consistent with, and trumped by, a higher percentage of smokers suffering ill health effects.

    A couple of years ago my wife and I spent a month or so heavily involved with end-of-life care for her sister, who had lung cancer. She was not a smoker, but worked in the basement of a dusty library for thirty years, which probably had something to do with it. The experience forever changed how I look at cancer. It's definitely not something to be taken lightly. Even though I knew people who had died of cancer before, I had never been through the process of seeing the body disintegrate and stop working, in often very unpleasant ways. So, I guess I'm not in favor of anybody blowing smoke in my face in restaurants. One of the reasons that I quit was that I already knew this, and sort of ostracized myself whenever I wanted to smoke, often outside in the cold. It just wasn't fun anymore.
    congrats on quitting. i actually did really quit smoking for 8 years. of course it can't be good for a person. you're inhaling smoke, for god's sake. it can't be good. but there are so many things in life "not good". when i started back? i did so because i wanted to stop drinking. but i figured i needed 1 legal vice to take it's place. so i stopped drinking for 3 weeks, and the drinking withdrawals became so ridiculous, now i do them both. but i would definitely advise against smoking. my only point was...it's not as drastic as what some people wanna turn it into.
    Last edited by dale; June 4th, 2015 at 10:08 PM.
    "Man, you should have seen them kicking Edgar Allan Poe.”

  10. #80
    I don't think anyone needs to be condemned for smoking around children. Probably not the best habit but not the worst either. I smoked when my kids were young. Heck when I had my oldest you could sit in the visiting area right around the corner from patient rooms...in the hospital...and smoke. I remember my OB coming in to congratulate us holding a lit cigarette. Things were different then. And that wasn't the dark ages, it was 1984.

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