So... How'd Your Day Go? - Page 664


Thread: So... How'd Your Day Go?

  1. #6631
    I have a writing book coming too, Glasshouse, unusual for me. Someone recommended it, I can't remember who, but I did think it looked interesting; called 'The best of sentences, the worst of sentences'.
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  2. #6632
    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    I have a writing book coming too, Glasshouse, unusual for me. Someone recommended it, I can't remember who, but I did think it looked interesting; called 'The best of sentences, the worst of sentences'.
    I have that book somewhere in the house. I'll look for it since you made me focus on the idea on how to improve the english. If I can't find my old copy I will google some summaries online. But I will look for it and thanks for reminding me I should read it. I ended up getting a paragraph book for ESL students that suggests how a cohesive sentence should look. I once looked at it online at the internet archive for free. I decided to get the second edition. This will remind me painfully after wasting money what I should be doing to get it right. Coherence and cohesion is what clarity and grace discusses both at length. I honestly wish it were more direct like cliffnotes. It has a somewhat of a conversational tone. I know if a sentence does not belong as does not relate to the next sentence or the topic it should be deleted. No matter how much I liked it. It's locked inside this room probably when I do search for it. It will take a while. My mom dislikes me disorganizing the room since she thinks I do a lousy job putting these back in place. She has spinal cord problems. If she agrees I am covered by the paragraph book for esls maybe (that is that it has the same points maybe or more). What I tend to do is not include a topic sentence and put a character in the subject. There are some other issues I am aware. But it makes me think since the ones who wrote the book on clarity style and grace is that they believed it could be taught. I will separate the composition process from the proofreading process. I am aware the composition process is something I researched little off until recently. I had that book (style) but it seems I never understood its points until I read summaries online. I could do the same for that book. I appreciate it. Thank you.
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; February 27th, 2021 at 02:39 AM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  3. #6633
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    I received a warm cup of tea hurled over my face this morning.

    I was proper raging for half a second, and he was giggling ten minutes later, and it was funny, very funny, and worth the soaked sweatshirt. A moment for disability rights agendas and f**k the man/gaoler.

  4. #6634
    Quote Originally Posted by Matchu View Post
    I received a warm cup of tea hurled over my face this morning.
    Milk and two shuggs, or...?


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  5. #6635
    I found the book (It was the best of sentences it was the worst of sentences.) I will study it. Normalizations is something I heard about in the book clarity and grace. It gives examples in the appendix at the back of the book. I will start writing the points the writer makes tomorrow. I wasn't able to find clarity and style which I am guessing is somewhere else in the house.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  6. #6636
    Quote Originally Posted by Matchu View Post
    I received a warm cup of tea hurled over my face this morning.

    I was proper raging for half a second, and he was giggling ten minutes later, and it was funny, very funny, and worth the soaked sweatshirt. A moment for disability rights agendas and f**k the man/gaoler.
    Reasonable reaction, I'm so glad you have a sense of humor!
    What comes after the NaPo storm of poetry?
    Get ready for the
    May 2021 Collaborator Challenge.

    Send your potential partner a fruit basket and start begging!

  7. #6637
    Taught a Taekwondo class in the morning, then helped a woman putting together a program for survivors of domestic violence. When I got home I worked on the 2nd editing pass of my WIP - got 2 chapters done.

  8. #6638
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    Quote Originally Posted by bdcharles View Post
    Milk and two shuggs, or...?
    Yes.

    Warm tea is okay. If he threw hot tea our circumstances change, if that's proper English.

    ...

    After the rugby on the telly I'm back up there for the night.

    I'm feeling guilt-stricken after returning home yesterday evening and 'playing' on the WF, and my reaction to some chap's post that took me all Mary Whitehouse/& moral majority ways - and this being the condition I suffer intermittently. [And memories of] My last major episode [that] occurred in the company of the geriatric tabloid photographer. A nice story. It was when 'Oh What A Lovely War!' was filmed in Brighton the production placed thousands of crosses across the hillside for the closing scene: death, needless slaughter message stuff, y'know, filmed by helicopter...and my photographer being a gross pig thought this setting would also be perfect for one of his glamour model shots. Apparently it was in the Sun, topless lady draped aside graves. This is the gross bit, so don't read this bit. The old dog, he chuckled and said/declared 'tits like spaniel's ears!' in his memories, wistful like...At which point I fainted and he was arrested, serving 20 at Pentonville based on my evidence. Ah, miss the old boy, might be dead himself now Hope that was lucid.

  9. #6639
    I read 2 chapters of the sentence book recommended by Olly Buckle. So far I have a lot of notes. I am learning about subordinating and coordinating conjunctions. The point of whether a reader will care for the sentence is something about keeping the main clause clear which adds clarity. Relegating the main clause is considered a fault she frequently mentions and provides in the book to the reader with lots of examples. This creates a variety. This is some basic sentence structure to create some unique sentences.

    How will this information affect the reader? Why should he care? Look at the main subject and action of the sentence.

    The city council voted. They already know they voted. What the reader wants to know is why the voting is important to him?

    To get to the main point the writer asks himself: what will get my attention? The main point of your sentence can become a thing of real value. Such as the bumpy ride on main street or the bottom line on a tax bill. So by doing this I think you can write an effective topic sentence. By answering and asking these questions. (me thinking this is what she meant)


    I had a productive day today since I spent my time learning.
    Last edited by Theglasshouse; February 27th, 2021 at 11:57 PM.
    I would follow as in believe in the words of good moral leaders. Rather than the beliefs of oneself.
    The most difficult thing for a writer to comprehend is to experience silence, so speak up. (quoted from a member)

  10. #6640
    Hey, it was recommended to me. Don't blame me for recommending it, I only got my copy late this afternoon and haven't got round to reading any of it yet, You know more about it than I do, or did before I read your spoiler

    I am still reading about the politics of the Middle Ages. The first parliaments were strictly a matter for Lords. They only invited knights, gentlemen and merchants in (The commons) for a little bit at the end to approve a tax on trading because they didn't feel competent. Before that the king's income came from a levy on the Lords depending on how much land they controlled.
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    A whole swathe of entertainment, all sorts of lengths, all sorts of stories, all with that 'Olly' twist.

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