What is your guilty pleasure? - Page 7


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Thread: What is your guilty pleasure?

  1. #61
    Classic musicals. No one will watch them with me. I sing along.

    I also sing along with the radio in the car.

    Fudge poptarts. I hide them.
    Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a hard battle. ~Plato

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  2. #62
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  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by Guy Faukes View Post
    Hah, "I like to use a crowded tube train to touch women". Oh Dara. /chuckle
    Remember kids: Drink vodka, play Dotka!


  4. #64
    Well, I guess if we started delving in our true guilty pleasures, this thread might get a little dark really fast
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  5. #65
    Quote Originally Posted by SwitchBack View Post
    Old house "hunting" - by appointment and open house venues. By old, I mean early 1900s and earlier. I can not stand modern "architectural design" LOL. Particularly ultra modern - they remind me of prison cell blocks [all clean cut corners and absolutely no character]. I'll take a crumbling half rotten 1910 house over an ultra modern any day.
    I felt that way too until I owned a house from the 1920s. The electrical is weird, the add-ons are off (weird angles where nothing fits, sloping floors, inaccessible outlets), the doors all stick weird, the windows are drafty, and the plumbing sucks. The house itself isn't worth the money I'd have to sink into it. And there's no storage. Not to mention all the rooms are tiny and the layout is weird. I never thought I'd want to build my own house but I do.

    I want something small but with a good design/layout where there's either room for growth or the room's already there.

  6. #66
    I'm in an apartment that was converted from a 1920's family home. They're so prone to damp because they're poorly ventilated and it gets so cold! The upkeep is too much for me. I feel your pain! :___;

    I think that modern builds can be lovely. Modern builds based on 1900s architecture would be the ultimate ^^
    Remember kids: Drink vodka, play Dotka!


  7. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by amsawtell View Post
    I never thought I'd want to build my own house but I do.

    I want something small but with a good design/layout where there's either room for growth or the room's already there.
    The surest way of getting over this is to build your own house. It seems so awesome, until you realize it's terrible.
    Wisdom is seldom boisterous.

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  8. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by InstituteMan View Post
    The surest way of getting over this is to build your own house. It seems so awesome, until you realize it's terrible.
    I was waiting for you to drop the other shoe with that second sentence. What's even harder is to try to keep up with, let alone improve, an 1870's New England L Cape house your wife fell in love with.

    My writing workspace is in what was the marryin' and buryin' room. That's right, one door comes in from the front door and the other goes out a side door. It was the room where both family members were married and were laid out for a final goodbye.

    I think the wife's tiring now though, having to carry in wood for the heater this winter now that it's difficult for me. But roles have switched in more ways that one, as I'm now set on this being my last residence having put so much into it.

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  9. #69
    Quote Originally Posted by amsawtell View Post
    I felt that way too until I owned a house from the 1920s. The electrical is weird, the add-ons are off (weird angles where nothing fits, sloping floors, inaccessible outlets), the doors all stick weird, the windows are drafty, and the plumbing sucks. The house itself isn't worth the money I'd have to sink into it. And there's no storage. Not to mention all the rooms are tiny and the layout is weird. I never thought I'd want to build my own house but I do.

    I want something small but with a good design/layout where there's either room for growth or the room's already there.
    Yep - had that sort of fun with a 1903 Australian villa, including bringing the shower and toilet inside. I do still love the old places for their high ceilings (until the light globe needs replacing), aged timberwork and general character, but all things considered, I am very happy in my boring, conventional, little 1990s house on a postage stamp block of land, with its lack of repair and maintenance requirements, great sound and thermal insulation, and floors that don't bounce when I walk on them.

    I compromised by making what little garden space there is into something more fitting a century old cottage - various old and weathered bricks and pavers and broken pieces of concrete for the courtyard and pathways and the odd bit of retaining wall, and crowded or rambling plants to fill the rest.
    "I don't know ... I'm making it up as I go ..." - Dr I Jones

    Nature abhors perfection - cats abhor a vacuum!

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  10. #70
    I love old homes for their architecture and, as Cran mentioned, their high ceilings. I also like the over-sized windows and conveniences like "mud-rooms", cellars, and full attics. But, all that space comes at a price - They're very difficult to heat/cool efficiently. One feature many newer homes don't have are "whole house fans" which are fans placed in a central location, usually covered by mechanical louvers, and exhausting into an attic or similar area that are designed to pull in a nice draft from open windows, to fully ventilate a house. We had one when I was growing up and on a summer day, that was the best way to cool and refresh the interior of the house, quickly. I miss that sort of thing. One thing I'm particularly fond of in an older house is the custom woodwork, especially carvings. I also like custom stonework available in and around fireplaces and kitchens. Things like dumbwaiters and coal chutes are cool, too. Secret passages are a very desirable selling point!

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