Encouragement vs Honesty - Page 4


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Thread: Encouragement vs Honesty

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by InstituteMan View Post
    Oh, I've seen writing with nothing much to redeem it other than the effort involved with writing it. Not on here, mind you.
    As have I. Mostly when cruising the 'self published' dungeons.

    But, even so, I wouldn't flat out discourage a writer of even the most horrible dreck to be found in those dungeons.

    Would I let them know that they needed to work, perhaps a LOT, on their writing? Yep. Would I beat them over the head while doing so? Nope.
    “Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were, but without it we go nowhere.” -Carl Sagan

    Real courage is found, not in the willingness to risk death, but in the willingness to stand, alone if necessary, against the ignorant and disapproving herd. --Jon Roland, 1976

    Have you checked out the Hidden Content

    Founder of the Pantsers United Group and member of the Fantasy Lords Group

    "Life is composed of lights and shadows, and we would be untruthful,
    insincere, and saccharine if we tried to pretend there were no shadows." - Walt Disney

  2. #32
    I think critiques are fair as long as they do not attack the author.

    To suggest I get to know the person behind the story before critiquing adds pressure, & a tiny bit of guilt, & that seems unfair. I cannot be responsible for the egos of strangers, especially writers who ought to know what to expect from this game of opinionation.
    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

    Hidden Content


  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by T.S.Bowman View Post
    Agreed. But, even though the idea itself may have been crappy, were there good things in the writing itself?
    i was actually just kidding. i've never wrote trash.
    "Man, you should have seen them kicking Edgar Allan Poe.”

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by dale View Post
    i was actually just kidding. i've never wrote trash.
    Nice. LOL
    “Imagination will often carry us to worlds that never were, but without it we go nowhere.” -Carl Sagan

    Real courage is found, not in the willingness to risk death, but in the willingness to stand, alone if necessary, against the ignorant and disapproving herd. --Jon Roland, 1976

    Have you checked out the Hidden Content

    Founder of the Pantsers United Group and member of the Fantasy Lords Group

    "Life is composed of lights and shadows, and we would be untruthful,
    insincere, and saccharine if we tried to pretend there were no shadows." - Walt Disney

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by T.S.Bowman View Post
    Nice. LOL
    lol. no. i have wrote what i consider trash. some of it has even been published. but never a whole story trash. just parts of a story where i got too wasted and became confused during a segment of a story. i can tell it when i reread those parts. most writers here have potential. basically, if i'm of the opinion a writer doesn't have potential here? i'll just ignore them rather than down them. those types usually leave here in a month or so anyway.
    "Man, you should have seen them kicking Edgar Allan Poe.”

  6. #36
    Member hvysmker's Avatar
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    When I retired and thought try my hand at fiction writing, my work was extremely bad. The few honest crits I received were three times the length of a story and must have taken an hour a page to compile. I quit the first writing site I tried because two of the Admins told me they weren't going to crit my stories anymore. Really. I won't mention which site but it had something to do with "toasting". He-he.

    I almost quit at that point. A few years later, I went back to that toasting site and won real money as second place on a contest. Then, I quit again, satisfied.

    Yes. By all means, tear me a new one if the old one doesn't eject correctly. I have thick skin and can take it.

    I try to be honest and gentle on my crits. I recently started one here and the story made no sense. None at all. I couldn't even make out the storyline. It was the first time in many years that I simply gave up. I also noticed twenty-some others had clicked on it without comment. Did that help the author? I don't believe so. Even a harsh critique would have helped more than being ignored. Sometimes you have no choice but to be harsh since it's better than nothing.

    Charlie

  7. #37
    I think thick skin is important because we can't control how others are going to react to our work. All we can control is whether we choose to keep writing despite some of the nasty comments that invariably get left in critiques or reviews (not so much at WF, thankfully). However, I don't see any reason to be harsh. I aim to be honest where I think something needs work, yet encouraging where I think they've done well. Though I'll admit I've made mistakes at times in trying too hard to find the good where there wasn't much to speak of. But even if the work is pure junk, I think it's better to use a little tact to tell them so.

    "Life is a risk; so is writing. You have to love it." ~ Richard Matheson

  8. #38
    This is EXACTLY why I write on a copper-plated handmade paper with a Montblanc Boheme Royal fountain pen and a special blue-black archival quality ink from the UK. So no matter what I write, there is still some redeeming quality to the paper and ink itself.

    Quote Originally Posted by InstituteMan View Post
    Oh, I've seen writing with nothing much to redeem it other than the effort involved with writing it. Not on here, mind you.


  9. #39
    the best critiques i ever got in the workshop when i 1st came here told me how my writing DIDN'T work. at 1st, i wanted to curl my lip at it out of ego. but what mattered is that it was what i needed to hear. so after i got done lip-curling, i was able to see that i was not writing god and needed improvement. then i became writing demigod. and i can live with that.
    "Man, you should have seen them kicking Edgar Allan Poe.”

  10. #40
    Speaking only for myself. I don't invest in critiquing stuff that I don't find merit in. A good critique requires effort and I'm one of the laziest people I know. I'm also one of the busiest. I'm taking a full load of college courses and chairing a 3-day conference. So if I choose to critique something of yours, it is a privilege. I realize that reads like all of the ego, but it's simple truth.

    I call them as I see them--balls and strikes, foul and fair. It isn't my job to give you warm fuzzies.

    There is a mindset in poetry that if you feel it, it's okay, you don't need rules or structure or even to make sense. And invariably someone who belongs to that school of thought comes behind me and says, whatever you wrote is "perfect" or "just fine" or whatever exactly as you've written it. The truth is, poetry is like any other writing; the more you work at it, the better you get. And if you want someone to traditionally publish your work, you have to be very good.
    Dream big, fight hard, live proud!

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