The Oxford comma. - Page 2


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Thread: The Oxford comma.

  1. #11
    Thank you, but I gave the speech two weeks ago.

    What I did was expand my speech to also cover the Cambridge comma and why NOT to use it. I referred to it as the "drama comma" throughout my speech.
    Everything you want is just outside your comfort zone.
    — Robert G. Allen

  2. #12
    Now I'm confused. In your example the comma was not used before the conjunction. ... parents, Ayn Rand, and god ... would be using it before the conjunction. In which case I feel it would rather definitely be redundant.

  3. #13
    How would it?

    As it stands in my example, her parents are Ayn Rand and God. That's what that sentence conveys.

    With an Oxford comma, it becomes:

    I dedicate this book to my parents, Ayn Rand, and God.

    Three separate people. She's dedicating the book to her parents, Ayn Rand, and God. No comma before that conjunction and her parents are, in fact, Ayn Rand and God.
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  4. #14
    The beat goes on. I won't argue the point. Others can put commas where they choose, I'll put them where I chose. I've had editors who seemed to use a salt-shaker to spread commas everywhere and others who didn't want them anywhere they weren't absolutely necessary. I try for a happy medium. Use them where the natural pauses in speech occur, thus, in some special instances, before a conjunction - such as in the preceding sentence.

  5. #15
    Seedy - The so-called Oxford comma is the one comma that is essential punctuation. And I know what you mean about some editors sprinkling commas everywhere and others erasing almost all of them. I follow Hart's Rules and let the editors do as they please. The one thing they must never do is misspell my name on the cheque.
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

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