"Alright" or "All right.' - Page 4


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Thread: "Alright" or "All right.'

  1. #31
    "Altogether" wasn't a real word, either, until the 13th century, when the words "al" and "togedere" were combined, in Middle English. "Altogedere" became our modern day English, "altogether."

    Same with "already" (Middle English "al" + "redy"), which had its origin of use in the 14th century.

    "Alright" didn't start being used until the early 1800's. It's still relatively new, informal, and hasn't yet gained acceptance as a proper word.

    (This is all according to Merriam-Webster.)

    I'm sure, in a few hundred years or so (maybe more, maybe less) "alright" will be an undisputed official word. Language is evolving, and like any form of evolution, these things take time.

    Right now, though, "alright" is informal and incorrect. But, in the future I bet it'll join the ranks of the other al+ words.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by KyleColorado View Post
    "Altogether" wasn't a real word, either, until the 13th century, when the words "al" and "togedere" were combined, in Middle English. "Altogedere" became our modern day English, "altogether."

    Same with "already" (Middle English "al" + "redy"), which had its origin of use in the 14th century.

    "Alright" didn't start being used until the early 1800's. It's still relatively new, informal, and hasn't yet gained acceptance as a proper word.

    (This is all according to Merriam-Webster.)

    I'm sure, in a few hundred years or so (maybe more, maybe less) "alright" will be an undisputed official word. Language is evolving, and like any form of evolution, these things take time.

    Right now, though, "alright" is informal and incorrect. But, in the future I bet it'll join the ranks of the other al+ words.
    That's it. That's all. There's nothing to argue.

  3. #33
    There seems to be a misconception that alright is somehow all right because it seems similar to altogether and already. That is not the case. Alright is used as a synonym for all right, where altogether and already are not synonyms of all together and all ready.

    Altogether means, entirely (the weather today is altogether wonderful), all together, on the other hand, means, collectively (we ran the race all together). The latter can be rearranged splitting all from together (we all ran the race together). The former makes no sense if you do the same (all the weather today is together wonderful).

    Already means, previously (we already have a ride to the beach), all ready means, prepared (the envelopes are all ready to mail). Again the two word version can be rearranged and still make sense (all the envelopes are ready to mail) while the one word cannot be split (we all have a ready ride to the beach).

    No such distinction exists for 'alright'. It's usage is exactly the same as all right, therefore superfluous.
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  4. #34
    WF Veteran Gyarachu's Avatar
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    Well, I am going to go back on my word and post again, because the amount of selective reading going on is infuriating.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam View Post
    Sorry to be the one to break this to you, but there is no such word in the Oxford English dictionary (the pre-eminent English dictionary in the world) as 'alright'.

    It does not exist.

    You can assert that no one listens all you want, but you're the one at the moment who isn't listening. The word has not yet been integrated into the language. The proper spelling is 'all right'. That's the point being made.
    I am listening. I am not denying that "alright" is not in the OED, nor am I denying that it is not accepted by the vast majority of professors/editors/etc. That is not what I am arguing against. A reread of my posts would make that obvious. Why you can't wrap your mind around that is beyond me.

    What I am saying is that OED has no absolute authority in the matter. Why is their word final? I will happily agree that their dictionary covers virtually all of commonly used English language, but can you give me an authority that decides what objectively is and isn't a word? When does a word become a word? Who decides once and for all with absolute authority that it has become part of the English language. Clearly "alright" exists. Just because it doesn't exist within the pages of OED or other dictionaries doesn't mean it isn't in existence.

    What grants the power to decide absolutely what is and isn't a word? How many people do you need? What title do you need? What organization do you have to be a part of?

    That is all I am saying. Not that massive organizations don't recognize it. Not that most people don't view "all right" as the proper usage. Not that many simply don't like it. My point is that people decide what is and isn't a word, but no one has absolute authority on the matter.
    Last edited by Gyarachu; June 13th, 2014 at 08:44 PM.
    "Fantasy is the literature of hope. In fantasy there is a belief that you can make a difference. Today may be bleak, but you can live through today. And tomorrow will be better. And maybe there'll be a different darkness tomorrow, but you can live through that, too, and you can make the light come, and the darkness go away. It doesn't matter how many times the darkness comes. There is always hope for something better." ~Robert Jordan

    "Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again." ~C.S. Lewis

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Gyarachu View Post
    Well, I am going to go back on my word and post again, because the amount of selective reading going on is infuriating.



    I am listening. I am not denying that "alright" is not in the OED, nor am I denying that it is not accepted by the vast majority of professors/editors/etc. That is not what I am arguing against. A reread of my post would make that obvious. Why you can't wrap your mind around that is beyond me.

    What I am saying is that OED has no absolute authority in the matter. Why is their word final? I will happily agree that their dictionary covers virtually all of commonly used English language, but can you give me an authority that decides what objectively is and isn't a word? When does a word become a word? Who decides once and for all with absolute authority that it has become part of the English language. Clearly "alright" exists. Just because it doesn't exist within the pages of OED or other dictionaries doesn't mean it isn't in existence.

    What grants the power to decide absolutely what is and isn't a word? How many people do you need? What title do you need? What organization do you have to be a part of?

    That is all I am saying. Not that massive organizations don't recognize it. Not that most people don't view "all right" as the proper usage. Not that many simply don't like it. My point is that people decide what is and isn't a word, but no one has absolute authority on the matter.
    Here you go again. Your discussion is in the wrong forum for this. Create a topic on Linguistics and theory and we can debate this issue. For now, to answer your question of who has the "authority" on deeming a word a word, start by reading Saussure, then move onto Derrida. All of your questions have already been answered by the hundreds of Linguists who got paid to answer it.

  6. #36
    WF Veteran Gyarachu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.T. Chris View Post
    Here you go again. Your discussion is in the wrong forum for this. Create a topic on Linguistics and theory and we can debate this issue. For now, to answer your question of who has the "authority" on deeming a word a word, start by reading Saussure, then move onto Derrida. All of your questions have already been answered by the hundreds of Linguists who got paid to answer it.
    It is certainly the correct thread. I can't believe I have to re-answer this. The OP asked which is correct. I am saying that because of the things I have argued, both are correct, because there is no absolute authority. There is, however, a widely accepted and commonly used form, which would be a much smarter choice in many situations. However, there are situations in which it won't matter.
    "Fantasy is the literature of hope. In fantasy there is a belief that you can make a difference. Today may be bleak, but you can live through today. And tomorrow will be better. And maybe there'll be a different darkness tomorrow, but you can live through that, too, and you can make the light come, and the darkness go away. It doesn't matter how many times the darkness comes. There is always hope for something better." ~Robert Jordan

    "Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again." ~C.S. Lewis

  7. #37
    From a semi-reformed pedant:



    Now back to our regularly scheduled discussion.
    “Fools” said I, “You do not know
    Silence like a cancer grows
    Hear my words that I might teach you
    Take my arms that I might reach you”
    But my words like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed in the wells of silence : Simon & Garfunkel


    Those who enjoy stirring the chamber-pot should be required to lick the spoon.

    Our job as writers is to make readers dream, to infiltrate their minds with our words and create a new reality; a reality not theirs, and not ours, but a new, unique combination of both.

    Visit Amazon and the Kindle Store to check out Reflections in a Black Mirror, and Chase

    Hidden Content






  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Gyarachu View Post
    It is certainly the correct thread. I can't believe I have to re-answer this. The OP asked which is correct. I am saying that because of the things I have argued, both are correct, because there is no absolute authority. There is, however, a widely accepted and commonly used form, which would be a much smarter choice in many situations. However, there are situations in which it won't matter.
    Again, you are wrong. Are we really going back to this? There are entire disciplines dedicated to the study of language. This stuff is all answered in Linguistics 101.

    Why are you arguing with Linguists? These people have studied this their entire lives. Seriously. They know what they are doing. Go read anything they have written. I already suggested where you can start.

    I understand where you're coming from. I understand the argument you are making. I am simply trying to tell you that your argument has already been discussed in scholarship. If you are looking for the answers to your questions, they are out there already. I am encouraging you to read about them. I can't teach you theory in a forum.
    Last edited by J.T. Chris; June 13th, 2014 at 09:05 PM.

  9. #39
    WF Veteran Gyarachu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry D View Post
    From a semi-reformed pedant:



    Now back to our regularly scheduled discussion.
    I wouldn't exactly call it splitting hairs, as it creates two differing answers to the OP's question.
    "Fantasy is the literature of hope. In fantasy there is a belief that you can make a difference. Today may be bleak, but you can live through today. And tomorrow will be better. And maybe there'll be a different darkness tomorrow, but you can live through that, too, and you can make the light come, and the darkness go away. It doesn't matter how many times the darkness comes. There is always hope for something better." ~Robert Jordan

    "Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again." ~C.S. Lewis

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Gyarachu View Post
    I wouldn't exactly call it splitting hairs, as it creates two differing answers to the OP's question.
    It's like talking to a rock. There are not two differing answers to the OP's question. There is one answer. You are incredibly obstinate about all of this. You are arguing something about which you have no authority to argue. Your argument is not correct. It's what you don't seem to understand and you are beating a dead horse right now.

    Seriously, I can't even handle this anymore. My head is spinning. I don't understand how someone could argue against something like this.

    ALL RIGHT, I'm finished.

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