Re: 30 days a poet: Discussion thread


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Thread: Re: 30 days a poet: Discussion thread

  1. #1

    Re: 30 days a poet: Discussion thread

    Quote Originally Posted by dither View Post
    I find myself being constantly drawn to this,
    have returned so many times already,
    and I don't know why.
    It's like, I want to respond, but I don't know how.
    Write a poem. It doesn't have to be anything complicated. If you do it now, your first line will be:

    What they cannot hear.
    Dream big, fight hard, live proud!

  2. #2
    Member dither's Avatar
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    Astro,
    please don't be offended, well, a plea to WF really I suppose,
    I'm struggling to understand what exactly constitutes poetry.
    I am totally at a loss here.

    I've tried to understand by reading but I just don't get it.

    I'M SORRY.
    Last edited by dither; April 14th, 2014 at 04:14 PM.
    If i post a comment on a "WIP", LOOK! I'm a reader that's all, and i can only tell how i feel, as a READER, giving/offering feedback. Hoping to learn and grow here. So please, tell me where i'm going wrong.

    Me? I'm just a fly on the wall.

    Look! I'm trying, okay?

    One can but dream, if only i had dared.

    "The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is an attribute of the strong" Mahatma Gandhi.
    Alas, i am weak.

    I must find a way to Eastbourne and i so wish that i could dance.

  3. #3
    >chuckle< I think your confusion is more common than you think.

    Poetry, at its most basic, is word-art. There are many different kinds of poetry, but that's what they have in common. And like art, different people have different views as to whether some specific pieces are poetry or what I call "wordbarf".

    I think maybe this discussion should happen in another thread rather than in the midst of a word-game. I'll ask to have it moved.
    Dream big, fight hard, live proud!

  4. #4
    Member dither's Avatar
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    I suspect that's a bit like the sun crossword, you get it or you don't.

    Life eh?
    If i post a comment on a "WIP", LOOK! I'm a reader that's all, and i can only tell how i feel, as a READER, giving/offering feedback. Hoping to learn and grow here. So please, tell me where i'm going wrong.

    Me? I'm just a fly on the wall.

    Look! I'm trying, okay?

    One can but dream, if only i had dared.

    "The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is an attribute of the strong" Mahatma Gandhi.
    Alas, i am weak.

    I must find a way to Eastbourne and i so wish that i could dance.

  5. #5
    Interpreting crossword clues can be learnt, and so can deconstructing poetry. It's another language through and through, some parts of which are more accessible than others. So, whilst you might find something like Auden's Stop all the Clocks instantly relatable, because it is married to a very strong emotion, others take study and that's part of the charm. Michael Donaghy's Machines is a good example, for me. It's an exploration, and my own copy is scrawled with geometric theorem that I felt I had to look up to fully understand the complexity of the poem. Some poems demand that, some have multiple levels so you only need engage as much as you want to. As an aside, the most useful poem I found for getting a feel for rhyme, meter and feet (poetic language tools) is Lewis Carroll's Jabberwocky. It's a nonsense poem but it is metrically perfect, with a rhythm that marches.
    “Be happy with what you have and are, be generous with both, and you won't have to hunt for happiness.”



  6. #6
    Member dither's Avatar
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    I just looked it up;
    That's sort of what I thought poetry was.
    I find myself checking for a kind of rhythm and beat.
    I count syllables ( am I obsessing here?) though I'm not so sure of the importance of rhyme.

    Comments anybody?
    If i post a comment on a "WIP", LOOK! I'm a reader that's all, and i can only tell how i feel, as a READER, giving/offering feedback. Hoping to learn and grow here. So please, tell me where i'm going wrong.

    Me? I'm just a fly on the wall.

    Look! I'm trying, okay?

    One can but dream, if only i had dared.

    "The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is an attribute of the strong" Mahatma Gandhi.
    Alas, i am weak.

    I must find a way to Eastbourne and i so wish that i could dance.

  7. #7
    Some poetry is in the form of syllable counts. Haiku and cinquain come to mind.
    Dream big, fight hard, live proud!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by dither View Post
    I find myself checking for a kind of rhythm and beat.
    Some people find it useful to beat out metric feet rhythmically, like a cantering horse; da DUM da DUM da DUM da DUM. Each beat is a syllable stressed or unstressed.
    “Be happy with what you have and are, be generous with both, and you won't have to hunt for happiness.”



  9. #9
    Poetry often relies on meter (or syllable counts), rhyme, alliteration, imagery, and several other (sometimes completely optional) things.

    To me the difference between prose and poetry is this: prose tells a narrative while poetry tells an emotion. Annie's right. Poetry is word-art.

  10. #10
    I saw this link today via The Poetry Society; 10 Terms You Need to Know to Understand Poetry featured on the Huffington Post website...?
    “Be happy with what you have and are, be generous with both, and you won't have to hunt for happiness.”



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