Has anyone met any famous writers? How was that?


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Thread: Has anyone met any famous writers? How was that?

  1. #1
    Member Grizzly's Avatar
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    Has anyone met any famous writers? How was that?

    There are some writers whose personality is all on the page, and when you meet them it's a bit of a disappointment. Then there's others that are extremely full of themselves, but hell they've probably earned it. And then there are those that are just plain lovely, as much in person as they are in their writing.

    I've met George R. R. Martin and he had an awesome hat. He talked a lot and much of it was just about how wonderful he's always been, but I think he's earned this because he's friggin' George R. R. Martin.
    I've met Neil Gaiman and his voice is honest to god one of the most musical things I've ever heard. He's one of those all-around-awesome writers that I can only aspire to be.
    I've taken classes with Tim Powers and have had him read my work and all. He's the most perfect human being I've ever met, simply brilliant. Although not very good when it comes to constructive criticism, Mr. Powers is the best for motivation to continue writing.

    Have you ever met a famous (or close enough) writer? How'd that go?
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  2. #2
    Chuck Palahnhuk is nice. All about the writing and the stories -- his own as well as other peoples. When he did talk about himself, he didn't talk about his greatness, but he told hilarious stories about weird things that happened (like ordering few boxes of fake arms to give away as gag gifts, that arrived in the mail at the place of his talk a week before he did, when (unbeknownst to him) the hiker who had had to cut off his own arm was speaking). The writer he most recommended to me (possibly as formative in his own writing) was Amy Hempel.

    I also have a friend who meets Neal Stephenson once a year and says that the man is awesome/nice.

    Lois Lowry gave a talk to a bunch of us English Teachers in training once. I didn't interact with her personally much, but she seemed okay. Mostly talked about herself and her history with books, but maybe they had asked her to. I'm not sure.
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  3. #3
    Theres an LGBT Young Teen writer, Julie Ann Peters, who came to my high school. I was so in love her with her books and I dressed all fancy for her and got my hair did and eryting. she was super nice and funny. She signed the book that really helped me discover myself at that time with ths mkst ridiculous thing (Spread your wings and fly Pidgeon. Which is the only time I've never gotten mad about a bird reference.) Even though she's based in Colorado I haven't seen her since and I would really like to.
    Last edited by Pidgeon84; March 30th, 2014 at 10:03 PM.
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  4. #4
    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    Back in the very early 60s I used to supervise Ian McEwan when he was doing Prep*; he was an edge of the crowd sort of boy, an observer not a joiner in. A couple of years ago I asked the Doc, our English master if he had any inkling, he hadn't, he saw nothing in the schoolboy that would lead him to believe he was teaching a Booker Prize winning author. There were at least two more authors from Woolverstone Hall; Alan Fisk, a writer of historical fiction, and Alan Gould, who now lives in Australia, who has published many novels and books of poetry. In the academic field there is Christopher "Paddy" Prendergast, a professor at Cambridge University, who recently supervised and edited the latest translation of "Les Temps Perdu". Also on the academic front is Julian Cobbing, ace fly-half, whose writings on the Mfecane Wars and the Zulu so upset the white supremacist elements in South Africa; when I last spoke to him a couple of years ago, he was professor of history at Rhodes University, though, being the same age as me, may well have retired by now. Then there is Martin Offiah's autobiography about his life as a rugby player, though I haven't met him. These are just a few of the Old Woolverstonians I know, not bad for a council school. Oops! I nearly forgot Professor Jack Lonergan, two time winner of the World Student Debating Championship, trombone player and author of 20 or so books on linguistics. Richard Daish, a poet, has his work used in the English syllabus in Hertfordshire schools - I'm sure that there are many more - All those I have contact with are regular people who are happy to chat over a pint or two, none wear their celebrity on their sleeve.









    *Prep - Homework at an English boarding school.
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  5. #5
    Member Ixarku's Avatar
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    I've never met any famous authors, but one of my best friends grew up with John Ringo. I've heard a few stories I'm not allowed to share. Said friend is apparently mentioned briefly as a character in one of his books.

  6. #6
    Larry Niven at a book signing. Didn't go well. Maybe he was having a bad day. Or maybe it was me and my expectations.

  7. #7
    I met Carole Nelson Douglas (Midnight Louie Mysteries) at a Christmas party held by our writer's group. Don't remember her much though, that was the night our hostess (one of the founding members of the group) had a heart attack and sadly died later. I've met several others at various writing seminars and conferences.

  8. #8
    I met Sean Carrol the physicist and science writer once (The Particle at the End of the Universe, and others). My family ever so slightly got to know him and his wife (a writer in her own right, and probably a better explainer of science than him). They are good people. They were nice to my kids, which is a way to get on my good side. Sean is particularly witty and fast on his feet, which is why he is a go-to interviewee for discoveries in physics.
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  9. #9
    At a convention, I met John Ringo briefly. He was friendly and humorous.

    I also met Harry Turtledove, and had the opportunity to chat with him for a short bit. He was interesting, thoughtful and polite.

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