Word usage/meaning: Warband vs Warparty


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Thread: Word usage/meaning: Warband vs Warparty

  1. #1

    Word usage/meaning: Warband vs Warparty

    Im currently writing a story that involves a group of raiders. When referring to the group as a whole, i cant decide if i should use the word warband or warparty.

    What is your reaction/assumption/impression from both words?

  2. #2
    I am not sure it really matters. Robin Hood and the merry gang wasn't amazing for it's name. It was amazing for the story and lore. Make the name amazing by telling an amazing story.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Skodt View Post
    I am not sure it really matters. Robin Hood and the merry gang wasn't amazing for it's name. It was amazing for the story and lore. Make the name amazing by telling an amazing story.
    of course. But which one sounds more primitive? does either lead you to a certain assumption about the group its describing?

  4. #4
    No. They both sounds like a generic name for a band of bandits. Which doesn't mean bad. They just neither illicit anything more. That is for the writing to bring them alive. Make them feared, or loved, depending on their purpose.
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  5. #5
    I agree with Skodt. Doesn't matter at all, and anyway warband and warparty boil down to the same thing, really. I'm assuming you've given this group a name, right? If so, I suggest just referring to them by this name and let their actions give the reader an impression.
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  6. #6
    Agree with above statements... if you want to break it down as primitive as possible, establish that it is a war party and in future references just refer to them as a party.

    For example:

    The several remaining members of the party sat in somber silence, the battle of Mottley Hill weighing heavy on their minds.

    OR....

    With the party formed, Beowulf signalled for his men to begin the march.

    OR....

    What they needed was someone to command the warparty; a man capable of taking the three hundred men across the desert sands in one piece. Only one man could manage it. Beowulf. Add the three hundred men he commanded already and the victory was practically guaranteed. (And from here on you can just refer to them as a party)

    Depending on the number of people in the "party" can change what word to use; not just for party or band, but to use something else entirely. Also the time frame matters... like, if you want to get really technical, you may not list them as being 20 people, but a score of people, or four-score for eighty people... AND... If you go back far enough, such as medieval Europe, there was no official names that I am aware of that had names for groups. (Team, Squad, Platoon, Legion... etc...) I think they mostly came in during the time Romans conquered half the world... with their Roman Legions.

    What really matters, is choosing one and sticking to it throughout.

    A band of men implies an ill formed party... such as a band of thieves or a mob - or a group that has had to form without prior establishment due to circumstance... so that too is a factor.

    With Raiders - I would call them a party plain and simple, not a war party at all. Thinking to Scotland during the time of William Wallace, they were a 'Group' of rebels that formed a 'party of raiders' and went on to become an army.


    As for Skodt's post: Robin Hoods men are also referred to as; merry gang? I guess I never heard that version ^_^... in every tale of my childhood and the songs, they were always the merry men... or band of merry men ^_^

    Robin Hood, Robin Hood, riding through the glen...
    Robin Hood, Robin Hood, with his merry men...
    Last edited by Greimour; August 9th, 2013 at 07:22 AM.

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  7. #7
    ^ Your actually right and I am wrong. The Merry Gang is a local band around here. I must have been thinking of them as I wrote the post.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Skodt View Post
    No. They both sounds like a generic name for a band of bandits. Which doesn't mean bad. They just neither illicit anything more. That is for the writing to bring them alive. Make them feared, or loved, depending on their purpose.
    Oops! I'm certain you meant 'elicit' here.

  9. #9
    ^ Don't ever presume to correct me! Feel my wrath! ha.

    I officially resign from this thread. It has caused me too many mistakes.
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