Biggest pet peeve in writing? - Page 3


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Thread: Biggest pet peeve in writing?

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Charlaux View Post
    I don't like it when an author makes heroes lean, muscled, gem-stone eyes, under 45 just because they're good guys.
    Yes. Hollywood do this all the time when adapting PKD stories. My hereos (not that they're heroes anyway) never look like Tom Cruise/Brad Pitt/etc

  2. #22
    Authors trying to make all of their characters super witty, purple prose, and generally unrealistic dialogue (in that order).

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by OurJud View Post
    Yes. Hollywood do this all the time when adapting PKD stories. My hereos (not that they're heroes anyway) never look like Tom Cruise/Brad Pitt/etc
    And yet making a character NOT lean, muscled, etc. because you think people will label you as a Hollywood conformist or a sheep to societal norms or whatever is equally as bad. Obviously there are reasons for characters to fall into that description. People under 45 are more than likely to be fitter than those above 45, so if the character does any sort of overly strenuous physical activities that casting makes sense. The same goes for being lean and muscled. If you don't want your character to trod along and constantly need to stop to take a breather through an action-based story, a younger, muscled protagonist and/or hero is the logical choice.

  4. #24
    One of my biggest pet peeves regarding the writing process: hearing excuses for why a piece could be unfavorable (I wrote it half-asleep, it wasn't serious, it was only for school, etc). Nothing annoys me more than when I take time out of my day to help you (I get a lot of requests for beta reads on other sites), and you tell me nah, it was bad because I let it be bad. Do not have me critique it if you plum don't care! ):< Many of these people are also guilty of wanting to hear how they're the next JK Rowling and ignoring the stuff they need to work on to actually be the next JK Rowling. This site is pretty decent about owning up to your work, which is why I've taken a shine to its members.

    I don't care if a character is handsome or ugly, but I only like to hear those words used once. Describe toned arms or a white smile if you must- but please don't keep telling me he's gorgeous, handsome, or sexy. Use the generic hottie adjectives on more than one character and I start to go: okay, seriously?

    I have absolutely no problem with characters that are in shape and under 45. I prefer my characters to realistically be able to accomplish the takes beforehand; I ignore all stereotypes and do what I need to. If they can't, I move on to someone that can. Sure it might be "interesting" or "different" to have a 200 pound 46 year old woman survive in Spitsbergen without knowledge about the landscape, but I can make a foreign exchange student who just recovered from an ACL tear just as interesting and unique. As a reader I never judge a character by their appearance; I judge them on the personality and traits the writer gives us. Ask me about any of my favorite novels and I won't be able to tell you their weights or attractiveness, but I can damn well tell you what they did and what they're like!

  5. #25
    The words seem/seemingly used more than once in the narrative of a story. They are the wishy-washiest words. Commit to what you say.
    Last edited by Govinda; July 27th, 2013 at 03:06 PM.
    "I'm wildly expensive."
    ~ Olyver

  6. #26
    I guess it's a two part question. Pet peeve about your own writing process, then what you see in others. For my own, just about everything. One of my main ones is getting hung up on the second chapter. For others, invincible antagonists, boring descriptions, trying to be funny but failing miserably, repeating the same plot over and over, (for police procedurals) car chases, things blowing up, foot chases where the perp trys to climb a chain link fence....( I could be here all night).

    midnightpoet

  7. #27
    Query letters are the worst part of the writing process.

  8. #28
    One other pet peeve - writers who try to be "literary" and fail badly, only to look pretentious and self-conscious.

  9. #29
    Member Charlaux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dictarium View Post
    And yet making a character NOT lean, muscled, etc. because you think people will label you as a Hollywood conformist or a sheep to societal norms or whatever is equally as bad. Obviously there are reasons for characters to fall into that description. People under 45 are more than likely to be fitter than those above 45, so if the character does any sort of overly strenuous physical activities that casting makes sense. The same goes for being lean and muscled. If you don't want your character to trod along and constantly need to stop to take a breather through an action-based story, a younger, muscled protagonist and/or hero is the logical choice.
    A healthy narrator yes, but too often the problem falls into the lap of a sculpted, ex-army badass. This is a genre-dependent thing, like I said, and my pet peeve applies when a character doesn't 'necessarily need to be' attractive/fit/healthy. If your character is going to be running from avalanches, okay make him healthy because it would be a short story otherwise, but balance it out with a big flaw to his character/ability.

  10. #30
    One more, with feeling! Downer endings where the point is that life is pointless so why bother. Endings like this make me wonder if the writer is suicidal. If i want to be depressed i'll watch the six o'clock news. The end of a story does not need to be happy, but at least satisfying.

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