Can "Robert is..." be contracted to "Robert's?" - Page 7

Read our latest author interview on Flashes >>HERE<< .

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567
Results 61 to 63 of 63

Thread: Can "Robert is..." be contracted to "Robert's?"

  1. #61
    WF Veteran W.Goepner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Auburn, California
    Posts
    1,360
    Blog Entries
    1
    OH wow I am a jerk! I stepped into a discussion that is almost two years old. I think I will go crawl under my rock and quiver.
    My friends and family call me Bill, you may also.Hidden Content

    When people meet people,
    Potential Strangers, Acquaintances, Friends.

    When dogs meet people,
    Potential Friends, Acquaintances, Strangers.

    I would rather be the Dog.

    It takes only,
    A second to meet,
    A moment to know,
    A Lifetime to forget.


    A word without thought can destroy.
    Please remember to think before you speak.

  2. #62
    Quote Originally Posted by tony0310 View Post
    Contrary to some other opinions here, no you should not use Robert's as a contraction of Robert is. The verbal contraction should not be used with proper nouns and indeed cannot be used if the individual has a name ending in s such as Evans. Evans's would almost certainly confuse a reader.
    Strunk & White would disagree with you. And so do I. I've never heard of this rule about using no contraction with a proper name, and I'm the rule King. I do it all the time in dialogue, though it's less common for me to use any contraction in narration. It sounds like a rule some puckered percy invented to sound knowledgeable about grammar. Here:

    Possessive
    Robert's trunk is lost.

    Is
    Robert's coming home tomorrow.

    Has
    Robert's been sick.

    All perfectly acceptable with no hindrance to meaning whatsoever. Now I know that nowadays people often remove the second "s" in the possessive of a name ending in "s" mostly because it's a little awkward to say, but sorry, the possessive rule is "apostrophe s" regardless of whether the name ends in "s" or not. Of course, I've heard the rule that you remove the possessive "s" in ancient names like Euripedes, but I can see no justification for it.

    Now what I can agree with, not because it's a rule really, but just an observation of reality, is that you never contract "is" or "has" with a word ending in an "s" or "z" sound, regardless of whether it's a proper noun or not. Try to say it:

    James's coming home tomorrow.
    James's been sick.

    Denise's coming home tomorrow.
    Denise's been sick.

    You literally cannot speak the contraction. Your tongue automatically inserts the "is" and "has".

    That's my two cents.
    Last edited by John Oberon; August 23rd, 2015 at 02:45 AM.
    John Oberon
    Hidden Content

  3. #63
    Quote Originally Posted by John Oberon View Post
    Strunk & White would disagree with you. And so do I. I've never heard of this rule about using no contraction with a proper name, and I'm the rule King. I do it all the time in dialogue, though it's less common for me to use any contraction in narration. It sounds like a rule some puckered percy invented to sound knowledgeable about grammar. Here:

    Possessive
    Robert's trunk is lost.

    Is
    Robert's coming home tomorrow.

    Has
    Robert's been sick.

    All perfectly acceptable with no hindrance to meaning whatsoever. Now I know that nowadays people often remove the second "s" in the possessive of a name ending in "s" mostly because it's a little awkward to say, but sorry, the possessive rule is "apostrophe s" regardless of whether the name ends in "s" or not. Of course, I've heard the rule that you remove the possessive "s" in ancient names like Euripedes, but I can see no justification for it.

    Now what I can agree with, not because it's a rule really, but just an observation of reality, is that you never contract "is" or "has" with a word ending in an "s" or "z" sound, regardless of whether it's a proper noun or not. Try to say it:

    James's coming home tomorrow.
    James's been sick.

    Denise's coming home tomorrow.
    Denise's been sick.

    You literally cannot speak the contraction. You tongue automatically inserts the "is" and "has".

    That's my two cents.
    100% this. There's no rule regarding proper nouns and contractions - at least, not one widely known or used. And since language 'rules' are just descriptions of what's done anyway, that basically means no such rule exists.
    "Ideas may seem like gold nuggets, but they're more like seeds. You have to plant them, water them, weed them, nurture them, and watch them grow. Every seed will turn out differently depending on whose garden it lands in." Nickleby, 14/6/2013

Page 7 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.