Rate the books you just finished reading.


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Thread: Rate the books you just finished reading.

  1. #1

    Rate the books you just finished reading.

    It is pretty simple. Everyone in this section clearly loves reading. Sometimes we get stuck on what to choose next. Rate and describe briefly what you have just read. We all have seen the what are you reading now thread, but tell us about what you have finished now.

    The Daylight War: This the the third in the Demon Cycle series. The book is very long winded through description and dialogue that could be cut effectively. Such things as room decorations, clothes, hair swaying in the wind type things. For that the story is still easily followed; though I found myself skipping big chunks of prose with skim reading, and never missing a beat. This book goes back and forth between two sections of characters. While there is effectively about seven perspectives it really is more so cut up in land sections. This isn't so bad to follow; aside from a lot of information being repeated, and a lot of going back in time to read what has already happened. This in the end can off an off putting effect, but it builds the story none the less. The ending is really what saves this installment. The first two were better written and probably overall more entertaining. That said this ending really has me ready to clutch the next book; kind of out of anger though more so than expectation. Is that good for the author? Well it gets his book read one way or the other. Even if for the next two or so years I think of his name and cringe at his idea of a good ending spot. 4/5 Even with the flaws, I say it is still a very good read

  2. #2
    WF Veteran FleshEater's Avatar
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    Dean Koontz Intensity

    The story was good enough to keep me turning pages, but the conveniences wore thin after two hundred pages, and even more so by the end. The murderer was supposed to be a serial killer that broke all textbook definitions, which is fine, but he turned out to be more of a frat boy hellbent on intensity. The high part of this novel was the detailed psycho analysis, other than that, this book fell flat for me.
    “Put a gun to my head and paint the wall with my brains.”
    ― Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club
    “Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what’s wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.” —Neil Gaiman

  3. #3
    I could rate John Green's The Fault in Our Stars a 2/5 and expand on my rating, but I suspect some nerdfighter will read this and want to kill me. Let's just say the last time I read a YA novel I was actually 15... so my not being used to that genre/style of writing probably influenced my rating.
    "art: as the spirit wanes the form appears" - Charles Bukowski
    Hidden Content

  4. #4
    Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! - Richard P. Feynman

    Theoretical Physicists don't typically offer much in the way of adventurous anecdotes beyond the laboratory or the classroom, but from childhood Richard Feynman led a fascinating and very exciting life. From the beginning, where he's up in his room in the 1930's in Far Rockaway building primitive radios and catching things on fire with his experiments, right through to his work at Los Alamos during WWII and subsequent relative fame as a high-level physicist, he hooks you right in with an easy, entertaining style. He marched and danced in the Brazilian Carnaval, seriously pursued learning to play hand percussion, frequented strip clubs, and witnessed the first atomic bomb blast through a truck windshield, taught himself to crack safes for fun, experimented with sensory-deprivation tanks and their effect on consciousness, among other shenanigans. The technical bits are presented in bite-sized chunks and the anecdotal history of his life presented with immense affability. An enjoyable read, all the way through. I'm kind of sad that it's over.
    It all starts with a name and flows from there. A ridiculous moniker springs to mind and it launches like a multi-lubed slippery-sloop down chutes made of buttery-floops. Down, down, down. We watch, spellbound. Rapturous. Glockenspiel. We do our due diligence with penitence and penicillin. Do what’s due, then dew drops on your moon-pops.


  5. #5
    Cannery Row/Sweet Thursday...John Steinbeck...Both books are about the same place and characters but written some years apart. Set in Monterey it describes a host of people living out there lives just day to day..set just after the second world war it is a glimpse into the world of bums an hookers.
    The only one who can heal you is you.




  6. #6
    22.) John Carter: The God's of Mar- In the second installment of the John Carter series; John finds himself in many the crazy situations. With every situation comes a turn of events that leads him to safety. It starts out with Carter returning to give his nephew a script of his time back upon Mars; remember this information because it becomes a tick of mine later. After the nephew receives the information he puts the words into a legible story. This story takes off right as John Carter dies on Earth. He is found in quite the predicament. With the help of a green friend he fights through the instant death, but the plight isn't over. As he escapes certain death he is forced into a room; in this room he hears voices, and after the voices more beast are sent to kill him, but luckily he notices a revolving door; he takes his chance and faces off an excellent swordsman. He fells him but with naught left in his tank, then a second swordsman maybe better than the first appears at his back, and a call barley saves him. He fights this danger off, and hears his green friends cries of trouble. With the help of a slave he enters the room fighting off yet more beast, until finally the girl slave uses her power to calm the beast. She then leaves, and John Carter and his friend are left inside a room with no exit. Finally she returns and tells him there is no escaping the Holy Therns of Mars, but Carter will never take no for an answer. He fights his way into the palace, and then sleeps in the store room out of total exhaustion. When he awakes his freed slave crew is dead, except the girl, and his green friend. Now under the guise of a Holy Thern( Whom fate has it he is identical to) he moves across the palace, but as he exits a swarm of black pirates is now randomly attacking the Therns-What fates!- he uses this time to try to procure one of the Blacks ship, but they spot him, and he fights them off; then he sends off his friends to whatever fate lies in their future. For him the rest of the story bounces around in these crazy situations, and even oft time crazier solutions. Now this book was quite filled with action, but little of it made you sit on the edge of your seat. Matter of fact I skipped a lot of the longer boring action scenes. In the end we come full round and find ourselves facing the original enemies. In a miracle array of events Carter comes out with a victory, but with victory comes defeat. His wife is trapped in a rotating prison for a year, he sees another prisoner stab at her, but does not know the outcome, and there we end this story of book two. My nitpick is that he came back to earth, knowing how to transverse the two planets with ease now. He had been dead for a long amount of time, but we are left with a cliff hanger? How is that even possible due to the events?


    With all this against the book; even with it not being a bad read. I can't find myself giving it more than 2.8/5

  7. #7
    WF Veteran FleshEater's Avatar
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    I finished Joe R. Lansdale's Edge of Dark Water this weekend. It was absolutely amazing. The narration was written in a Texan drawl from the perspective of a seventeen year old girl. It's an adventure story like Huckleberry Fin. Full of laughs, suspense, and some parts horror, this has been one of the best reads I've had in a long time.
    “Put a gun to my head and paint the wall with my brains.”
    ― Chuck Palahniuk, Fight Club
    “Remember: when people tell you something’s wrong or doesn’t work, they are almost always right. When they tell you exactly what’s wrong and how to fix it, they are almost always wrong.” —Neil Gaiman

  8. #8
    Member Charlaux's Avatar
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    The Body Farm - Patricia Cornwell (4/5)

    The latest book I have read in my crime fiction phase, and one of my favourites. This book is told from Dr Kay Scarpetta's POV as she works with the FBI to investigate the killing of a child in a rural town. The book keeps two intriguing lines of plot and drama weaving (the individual crime and that of the wider series), simultaneously and IMO seamlessly, and I was still guessing right up to the end - and guessing wrong.

  9. #9
    Hunted, 6th book in the Iron Druid Chronicles by Kevin Hearne. It wouldn't be the best book to begin the series, although one could pick up well enough. As always the characters are varied and interesting, non-stop action with humor and intrigue woven in. In Hunted, Atticus, a 2000 year old druid (the last except for the apprentice he just finished training) is fleeing two the Greek and Roman goddesses of the hunt as he's ticked off their pantheons. The ways of escape he might normally used are closed, so it's a race to reach England and safety. If you enjoy fantasy and action, the series might be for you. For the series, I'd rate this a 8/10. As a novel compared to all others 9.5/10.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by FleshEater View Post
    I finished Joe R. Lansdale's Edge of Dark Water this weekend. It was absolutely amazing. The narration was written in a Texan drawl from the perspective of a seventeen year old girl. It's an adventure story like Huckleberry Fin. Full of laughs, suspense, and some parts horror, this has been one of the best reads I've had in a long time.
    Have you read his series of Hap and Leonard novels? I've read both Bad Chili and Mucho Mojo and enjoyed them thoroughly.
    "Lister, that is my private, personal, private diary; full of my personal, private, personal things."

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