Grammar questions - Page 2


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Thread: Grammar questions

  1. #11
    Those with gorilla-like hands like me will struggle to find a comfortable way to hold onto the camera.

    Shouldn't it be mine instead of me? Thanks.

    It doesn't matter. Either works, because each example modifies a different part of the sentence.

    If you use "like me," you're modifying "those." Those...like me will struggle...

    If you use "like mine" instead, you're modifying "hands." ...gorilla-like hands like mine...
    Last edited by candid petunia; May 31st, 2013 at 01:36 PM.
    "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." - Benjamin Franklin

    "I do not over-intellectualize the production process. I try to keep it simple: Tell the damned story." - Tom Clancy

  2. #12
    1. He is good at / in mathematics.
    2. He is bad at / in mathematics.
    3, He is weak in / at /on mathematics.
    4. He is poor in / at mathematics.
    5. He is hopeless in / at mathematics.

    Which preposition should I use for each of the sentences?

    Thanks.
    I would use "at" for each of them. I wouldn't use "on" at all, but a case could be made for "in" if you're referring to a particular class (instead of mathematics as a concept).
    Last edited by candid petunia; May 31st, 2013 at 01:43 PM.
    "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." - Benjamin Franklin

    "I do not over-intellectualize the production process. I try to keep it simple: Tell the damned story." - Tom Clancy

  3. #13
    The document has already been received at the office, and it is with the secretary.

    Just to confirm: Is 'the' needed? "..with the secretary' sounds fine to me until a friend told me it was not correct.

  4. #14

    Can I use 'among' for 'between' in the sentences?

    The fight was between Mike, Steve and Joe.

    The war was between China, France and Belgium.

    Divide the candy between Jessica, Frank and Cory.

    Can I use 'among' for 'between' in the sentences?

    Thank you.

  5. #15

    Which is correct sentence?

    Which is correct sentence?

    '' I would have never expected him to win the game.''

    '' I would never have expected him to win the game.''

    Thanks

  6. #16
    Remove the space between the quotation mark and "I", and both sentences are grammatically correct.

    They differ marginally in implications, however: The top one has a stronger suggestion that he won the game in the past when you did not expect him to, while the bottom one has a stronger suggestion that something occured to change your expectations. Keep in mind that, for all intents and purposes, they are interchangeable in nearly any circumstance.

    Hope this helped.

  7. #17
    The document has already been received at the office, and it is with the secretary.

    Just to confirm: Is 'the' needed? "..with the secretary' sounds fine to me until a friend told me it was not correct.
    Yes, you need "the" in both cases. Non-proper nouns always require articles.
    Last edited by candid petunia; May 31st, 2013 at 01:45 PM.
    "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." - Benjamin Franklin

    "I do not over-intellectualize the production process. I try to keep it simple: Tell the damned story." - Tom Clancy

  8. #18
    The fight was between Mike, Steve and Joe.

    The war was between China, France and Belgium.

    Divide the candy between Jessica, Frank and Cory.

    Can I use 'among' for 'between' in the sentences?

    Thank you.

    "Between" is only used when referring to two things. Use "among" for groups of three or more.

    All of your sentences should use "among."
    Last edited by candid petunia; May 31st, 2013 at 01:45 PM.
    "Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." - Benjamin Franklin

    "I do not over-intellectualize the production process. I try to keep it simple: Tell the damned story." - Tom Clancy

  9. #19
    The document has already been received at the office, and it is with the secretary.

    Just to confirm: Is 'the' needed? "..with the secretary' sounds fine to me until a friend told me it was not correct.
    Looks fine, though to smoothe it out, I'd personally take out the word "it" or use "it's".
    Last edited by candid petunia; May 31st, 2013 at 01:47 PM.
    "If at first you don't succeed, aff wi' the bunnet, and in wi' the heid." - Old Glasgow proverb.
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  10. #20

    Time and tide wait / waits for no man.

    Time and tide wait / waits for no man.

    Which verb should I use? Thanks.

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