Script Writing Software


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Thread: Script Writing Software

  1. #1
    WF Veteran Lewdog's Avatar
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    Script Writing Software

    I found a free script writing software, called Celtx. I just thought I would share the information.

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    I've tried Celtx. I think it's an excellent script program. I like the project system it uses. I'm looking for something that can do index card synopsis on the side, but Celtx is extremely good. It has a limited index card system, which is a bit of a let down, but no more so than Scrivener's IC system. Also, you can't setup formatting options for the different sections. I like to have the sluglines boldfaced but in Celtx, you would have to do that for each one independently.

    Some kudos to celtx, I like its inline note system. Scrivener doesn't have anything like it. You either write notes on the side panel, make annotations (which take up space on the page) or footnotes.

    Scrivener's index card system is better, but only slightly.

    If you want something that is more focused on scripts and you don't have a lot of money to spend (<$40), Cetlx is it. If you can spend $40, scrivener is more versatile.

    If you have a lot of money to spend, Final Draft appears to be top dog all around.
    Last edited by Robert_S; June 1st, 2013 at 08:39 PM.

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    Addendum: I tried the trial version of Final Draft 8. I has some features that I like. I like the fact that it automatically picks up character names and stores them in the auto-completion list. I like the scene selection box. It allows you to number scenes. It has much better analysis tools: amount of pages a scene takes, how much time a character gets, etc.

    I don't like the script being a single, monolithic document as opposed to Scrivener's binder system. I'm finding I don't really like the index card system on it, but I don't use Scrivener's index card system either, so there. The scene navigator works very nicely to give another means of going from part to part in a script.

    Like Scrivener, it allows you to change the font of elements, so I can bold face sluglines.

    Scrivener's outline system is infinitely better (especially since FD8 doesn't have an outline feature at all), but beyond FD8's complete lack of, Scrivener's outline system allows you to use folders or text pages and you can stack text pages under text pages, text under folders, folders under folders, folders under text, etc, etc, etc., so it's a true hierarchical outline system. However, Scrivener lacks any serious statistics and analysis tools.

    I would still buy FD8 if I had the money and use it for script analysis and revision, but I'm more likely to use Scrivener for creating the first draft.

    Lastly, scrivener is more versatile and can be used for short stories and novels, so scrivener is a serious go to and at $40 it delivers the most bang for the buck.
    Last edited by Robert_S; June 25th, 2013 at 05:01 AM.

  4. #4
    A buddy of mine who went to Columbia University here in Chicago told me about Celtx. It's what the film program there uses to draft their screenplays/scripts.

  5. #5
    I used Celtx for a while before I made the jump to Final Draft. In a way, I think celtx is slightly better. It's free, and a fair amount of it's features give Final Draft's a run for their money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by voliminal View Post
    I used Celtx for a while before I made the jump to Final Draft. In a way, I think celtx is slightly better. It's free, and a fair amount of it's features give Final Draft's a run for their money.
    I agree. Celtx has all the format utility of FD8. Pretty much the real stand out part of FD8 is the analysis tools, maybe the revision tools also, but that is a maybe.

    The only thing missing from Celtx that I wish they had is the ability to define element formats. I like to have bold faced sluglines, but the only way to do that in Celtx is by highlighting each and every slugline and clicking the 'B'.
    Last edited by Robert_S; July 4th, 2013 at 06:20 PM.

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    I have another find. Trelby. It's a free cross-platform screenwriter's software for Windows, Mac OS and Linux. I remember trying it once, but I can't remember why I didn't stick with it longer. I'm going to take another look at it and render an opinion.

    ADDENDUM: Hmmm...Trelby actually looks good. It has very good analysis tools. The means of choosing elements is a bit funky and sometime, I don't know why, I can't type anything. One other issue is that whenever it attempt to print something to pdf, I get a dialog box saying it can't open Acrobat in protected mode. The only option I see as of now is to choose to open with Protected mode disabled.

    Some cons: can't import rtf.
    Pros: it can import final draft 8, Screenwriter, Celtx, Adobe Story XML, fountain and fadein and formatted text (whatever that is).
    A big con: sometimes, as in often, it won't register keyboard input. This is the windows version.
    A good pro: Made for Windows, MacOS and Linux.
    Last edited by Robert_S; July 13th, 2013 at 01:29 AM.

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    I will also add a couple other things. I have element styles w/ margins setup in OpenOffice and I'm sure it would be zero trouble setting them up in Word.


    Secondly, I found a Courier font made quite specifically for script writing. Courier Prime - A Courier made for screenplays. | Quote-Unquote Apps.



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    There are scriptwriting templates available for OpenOffice and LibreOffice (screenplays, theatrical plays, radio dramas, and other media. I haven't used them yet so I cannot offer opinions on how good or bad they are.

    They are available here: Portfolio of scripts by Anikó J. Bartos + Alan C. Baird... You have to scroll way down the page to get them. They are also available through the Open/LibreOffice extension sites.

  10. #10
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    Very good information. I was thinking of getting Final Draft sometime. But since there are other software script programs out there for free, heck, I'll just check those out instead. Thank you for the information.

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