Self publishing to getting picked up - Page 3


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Thread: Self publishing to getting picked up

  1. #21
    As regards self-publishing as a means to (hopefully) picking up a traditional book deal, I do think getting the book out there yourself is the best thing to do. Very few new authors are being picked up by the big publishing houses right now, and you can spend your entire life, and a small fortune in postage, hoping to be accepted. Why not self-publish? It saves the heartache of one rejection letter after another, and if the book is good enough, there is just as good a chance it will eventually come to the attention of one the big boys. Plus, it's a good feeling to finally get it out there in the open for all to see.

  2. #22
    I publish as ebook currently but I know that not publishing via paperback you are missing a niche, so I am considering printing with my next book. I am considering createspace rather than lulu, for the sheer fact I have a designer to create my book covers and lulu is just a pain when it comes to that. I believe they make it so difficult so you use their own and spend more money or using the basic designer tool, which isn't the best to be quite honest.

  3. #23
    Great thread, I need this thread, been thinking of doing this

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by michaeljoseph View Post
    As regards self-publishing as a means to (hopefully) picking up a traditional book deal, I do think getting the book out there yourself is the best thing to do. Very few new authors are being picked up by the big publishing houses right now, and you can spend your entire life, and a small fortune in postage, hoping to be accepted. Why not self-publish? It saves the heartache of one rejection letter after another, and if the book is good enough, there is just as good a chance it will eventually come to the attention of one the big boys. Plus, it's a good feeling to finally get it out there in the open for all to see.
    If the book is good enough to catch the attention of the 'big boys', you probably wouldn't be getting one rejection letter after another. And your book is going to have to be very, very, very good (ie sell like crazy!) to have it come to their attention. Of course, there's that "eventually" caveat - so maybe after you spend your entire life and a small fortune in printing/editing/cover art/advertising/marketing, it could happen.

    And this idea that publishers aren't picking up new authors - where does this keep coming from? Why do people keep thinking publishers have a "lifetime plus" contract with their current writers? Writers quit, retire, get sick, or die - even the most successful ones. What do you think publishers do then? Pull up the next Stephen King who's just been sitting there waiting for them?
    Has left the building.

  5. #25
    'If your book is good enough to catch the attention of the big boys, you probably wouldn't be getting one rejection letter after another.'

    A naive statement, to say the least. What about all the successful authors whose debut work was repeatedly rejected before someone finally saw the potential, took the work on, and saw it become a commercial success?

    'And this idea that publishers aren't picking up new authors - where does this keep coming from?'

    The 'idea' comes from the letters that publishers send back stating they only take on a handful of new writers each year. And the agent's submission pages on publisher's websites that say the same.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by michaeljoseph View Post
    'If your book is good enough to catch the attention of the big boys, you probably wouldn't be getting one rejection letter after another.'

    A naive statement, to say the least. What about all the successful authors whose debut work was repeatedly rejected before someone finally saw the potential, took the work on, and saw it become a commercial success?
    Well, I suppose one should ask how many rejection letters are going to persuade a writer to quit trying. Yes, some authors received a great many rejections - but then, many of those authors also revised their books based on the rejections. Had they done that first, maybe they would have been picked up earlier. Then again, a great many authors did not receive rejection after rejection. But just the idea that not everyone in publishing is going to want to grab your story immediately is a pretty poor reason not to try.

    And just how many authors have self-published and gone on to a trade contract? I'd be willing to bet a lot fewer than those who got all the rejections first. That's why they make the news. When it becomes old hat...

    Quote Originally Posted by michaeljoseph View Post
    'And this idea that publishers aren't picking up new authors - where does this keep coming from?'

    The 'idea' comes from the letters that publishers send back stating they only take on a handful of new writers each year. And the agent's submission pages on publisher's websites that say the same.
    What you said was "Very few new authors are being picked up by the big publishing houses right now," - as if something had changed. No, publishers don't sign a large number of new authors, but that's always been the case. That's what makes getting picked by a trade publisher difficult and noteworthy. But again, just the fact that they aren't signing every Tom, Dick, or Harriet that comes along is no reason not to try.

    What you're basically saying is that to save your (generic) ego from rejection letter boo-boos, the reality of competing against other well-written books, and pretending that you stand just as good a chance of being found by publishers eventually as you would putting your stuff right in front of them, you should forget about even making the attempt and just self-publish. That's a defeatist attitude, IMO. There are a lot of good reasons to self-publish - none of the above qualify.
    Has left the building.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by shadowwalker View Post
    Well, I suppose one should ask how many rejection letters are going to persuade a writer to quit trying. Yes, some authors received a great many rejections - but then, many of those authors also revised their books based on the rejections. Had they done that first, maybe they would have been picked up earlier. Then again, a great many authors did not receive rejection after rejection. But just the idea that not everyone in publishing is going to want to grab your story immediately is a pretty poor reason not to try.

    And just how many authors have self-published and gone on to a trade contract? I'd be willing to bet a lot fewer than those who got all the rejections first. That's why they make the news. When it becomes old hat...



    What you said was "Very few new authors are being picked up by the big publishing houses right now," - as if something had changed. No, publishers don't sign a large number of new authors, but that's always been the case. That's what makes getting picked by a trade publisher difficult and noteworthy. But again, just the fact that they aren't signing every Tom, Dick, or Harriet that comes along is no reason not to try.

    What you're basically saying is that to save your (generic) ego from rejection letter boo-boos, the reality of competing against other well-written books, and pretending that you stand just as good a chance of being found by publishers eventually as you would putting your stuff right in front of them, you should forget about even making the attempt and just self-publish. That's a defeatist attitude, IMO. There are a lot of good reasons to self-publish - none of the above qualify.
    My opinion is that if you feel you are not getting anywhere using one particular route, then don't give up but give yourself other options! I am a novice when it comes to computers, social media and the internet in general, so such tasks as formatting, uploading and designing a book cover were testing and time-consuming for me, as they are for any novice self-publisher. Self-promoting a book on the web, setting up a blog, researching marketing methods and brushing off any negative comments takes perseverance and a single-minded attitude. Hardly a defeatist attitude, IMO.

    It is up to each individual to choose how they try to get published. There is no right or wrong way. But, for me personally, I feel I am doing something constructive by self-publishing my book rather than sitting around waiting for something to happen.

  8. #28
    There are those that feel that traditional publishing is the ideal, simply because it is traditional. There are those that don't. I find the traditionalist argument utterly unconvincing, especially when advanced by folks who don't have traditionally published books to refer to.
    The reality is, if you're successful independently publishing, you don't need a traditional house to do your business. I know quite a few people who have abandoned the trad model in favor of indie publishing, having soured on the relationship, and are doing quite well. But most of those are people that were traditionally published and have an audience and a track record.
    If you haven't been published anywhere, for any reason, then the odds are greater that you won't succeed. It's like cold-calling.
    If you have a portfolio and a network, you give yourself more of an opportunity. An agent is the representative of that network in the trad model-he presents your ms. to a publisher with whom he is likely to already have a relationship, depending on that relationship, his/her reputation as a judge of salable writing, and your skill to sell the book.
    Publishing independently, you are your own agent, and your own everything. It requires a larger skillset.
    A publishing house has many factors to consider in buying a manuscript. You have many factors to consider in producing your own. If impatience with the trad model is your major impetus, it is possible that you haven't given the matter sufficient thought.
    Hidden Content
    "From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend reading it." - Groucho Marx

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by michaeljoseph View Post
    My opinion is that if you feel you are not getting anywhere using one particular route, then don't give up but give yourself other options!
    And on that, I totally agree. But it did sound, at least, as if you were saying looking for an agent/trade publisher was practically an impossible task, so why bother? And that's where I disagreed.
    Has left the building.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by shadowwalker View Post
    And on that, I totally agree. But it did sound, at least, as if you were saying looking for an agent/trade publisher was practically an impossible task, so why bother? And that's where I disagreed.

    As Moderan just commented:
    'If you haven't been published anywhere, for any reason, then the odds are greater that you won't succeed.'

    My point, exactly. But an impossible task? Not at all. I'm just being realistic. I tried the traditional approach and discovered how difficult it is getting a manuscript published. Instead of feeling sorry for myself, I found an alternative in self-publishing. This route offers no greater chance of success, just another option. To be successful as a self-published author, your writing still needs to be of the highest quality, and you need to work like a trojan to promote your book. You also need huge dollops of good fortune. And that still may not be enough. Realism.

    So what do you do? Like I said, its up to each individual and no person should criticise another's methods. There are so many things I can do. Set up a website, write another book, continue to try and garner more exposure, re-edit my published novel, re-assess the cover and description of that book, try print-on-demand, return to submitting my work traditionally...Why should I not try anything and everything? Why not have an open mind?

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