Post-Apocolyptic books?

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  1. #1
    Member hiatus's Avatar
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    Post-Apocolyptic books?

    I'm really into this kind of stuff. Not like psyco babble but awesome stories. The walking dead (TV show) and Devil Survivor (Video Game) really got me loving this end of the world stuff.

    So does anybody know of another good post-apocolyptic story?

    I'd appreciate any recommendations
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  2. #2
    It's been a little while since we discussed this. Here's the last thread. Maybe it'll have some ideas for you.
    And it's Apocalyptic
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  3. #3
    While I enjoy Post-Apocalyptic literature, what I really enjoy is apocalyptic literature. To me, starting a novel after the fact is cheating. I want to read about how society met its doom, therefore, I have four favorites:

    The Stand by Stephen King – hands down one of the best and can just about always be found in every Top 10 Apocalyptic or Post-Apocalyptic list. The unabridged version is best.

    Lucifer’s Hammer by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle – It’s been awhile since I read this, but nicely done and nicely paced. I’ll probably read it again to help inspire me.

    Cannibal Reign by Thomas Koloniar – This one was published last year and is not about zombies. It has quickly become one of my favorites. His writing is superb and his dialog even better.

    World War-Z by Max Brooks – I’m not a big fan of zombie books because I haven’t found many that aren’t walk here get eaten, walk there get eaten, but this one is pretty good. I found the audio version even better.
    Last edited by Whisper; March 15th, 2013 at 02:28 PM.
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  4. #4
    As mentioned in the thread moderan linked to, Swan Song is excellent. Cormac Mcarthy's The Road is bleak yet hopeful. I just finished reading Dan Simmons, Flashback, a book about an economic and social apocalypse that is very good and probably the most realistic of them all.
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  5. #5
    Member hiatus's Avatar
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    This is awesome guys, Thanks. I got a spare twenty bucks decided to buy a book about what I'm currently interested in. I'll pick one read it then if I love it recommend them!
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Whisper View Post
    World War-Z by Max Brooks – I’m not a big fan of zombie books because I haven’t found many that aren’t walk here get eaten, walk there get eaten, but this one is pretty good. I found the audio version even better.
    Ditto (for the book).
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  7. #7
    John Dies at the End by David Wong is worth reading.
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  8. #8
    I recommend The passage +The Twelve by Jason Cronin, (its actually a trilogy) the third book isn't out yet to my knowledge It doesn't cheat but tells you why the world has fallen unlike some that just start after the event. It about a military experiments on death-row convicts that goes horribly wrong (they're trying to turn them into super soldiers) and they escape and inflect the world (the USA anyway) with a vampirism type virus. A great tale that really grips.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by hiatus View Post
    I'm really into this kind of stuff. Not like psyco babble but awesome stories. The walking dead (TV show) and Devil Survivor (Video Game) really got me loving this end of the world stuff.

    So does anybody know of another good post-apocolyptic story?

    I'd appreciate any recommendations


    The sci-fi adventure classic, H.G. Wells' The Time Machine is a must-read, in my opinion.

    The main character, a scientist, travels to the year 802,701 A.D. to explore Earth's far-distant future, and finds himself among the ruins of an ancient civilization.
    Last edited by Kyle R; March 15th, 2013 at 10:58 PM.

  10. #10
    Zombie holocaust things don't interest me. After They Thirst, neither do vampires. McCammon capped off the genre imo, and it qualifies for this column.
    Edgar Pangborn's Davy (Part of a series called Tales of a Darkening World) is to my mind the finest book of the genre, and the series one of the best.
    Others that I have liked include Spider Robinson's Telempath, John Christopher's No Blade of Grass, as well as others from the "cosy catastrophe" school.
    JG Ballard and Richard Cowper ably visited the "greenhouse gases kill us" and John Crowley's Engine Summer also treats somewhat with that notion.
    There are also things like Blood Music, The Screwfly Solution and I have No Mouth, and I Must Scream that are shining lights in a subgenre with such morbid concerns. Sam Delany's Dhalgren is another such. All of the above are things I've actually read and can recommend.
    Wiki has a nice list, and a good discussion.
    The subgenre is of course closely related to the dystopic fictions. 1984 and Brave New World are titans, as are Burgess' and Brunner's best-known works.
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