Like vs as though

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Thread: Like vs as though

  1. #1

    Like vs as though

    Is is okay to write:
    He gazed at the crowd like he was in some kind of trance.

    or should I change the word like to "as though" as was suggested to me. Personally I prefer "like".


    Thanks.

    FM

  2. #2
    imo both work, so I suppose it comes down to style and voice - it is up to you. You could also have 'as if'.

    I'm not sure if 'like' is grammatically correct - though I understand the meaning.
    Last edited by Trilby; February 11th, 2013 at 01:21 PM.

  3. #3
    He gazed at the crowd as though in a trance, is how I'd write it.

  4. #4
    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    I would use as if...
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  5. #5
    Generally I use "like" with a noun, "as if/though" with verbal phrases. Don't know if that's a rule, just seems right to me. For example:

    Coffee trickled down like blood from a wound

    She drank the coffee as if it could save her life


    On edit: a-ha! http://www.ehow.com/how_4392793_use-...correctly.html
    "like" is a preposition
    "as if" is a conjunction
    Last edited by lasm; February 11th, 2013 at 03:49 PM. Reason: research!

  6. #6
    Entranced, he gazed at the crowd.

  7. #7
    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    I have a thing about using like, I believe that I should think of something better, I feel that it is a cop-out, I would probably write:

    He gazed at the crowd as if he were in some kind of trance.
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  8. #8
    Like is an unobtrusive and perfectly good way -- and often the only sensible way -- to set up a simile. Why would you try to avoid it?

  9. #9
    "Like" seems more informal, so I'd use it in dialogue, but not narrative.
    Has left the building.

  10. #10
    In general -- or in just this instance?

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