Like vs as though - Page 2


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Thread: Like vs as though

  1. #11
    Well was he in a trance, momentarily at least, hypnotized as it were, or was he just like in a trance? What does that mean anyway, because that's something I've never experienced, to be like in a trance? Was he, or wasn't he?

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by JosephB View Post
    Like is an unobtrusive and perfectly good way -- and often the only sensible way -- to set up a simile. Why would you try to avoid it?
    Metaphors can be stronger and more poetic, similies are for beginners. Like is also overused in like every like pause in like conversation and its like asking permission of the reader to make the point. It works excellently in speech, less well in description. The trance thing is a cliche so that too would be best in direct speech. Depends on your genre though.

  3. #13
    It is a little fuzzy and maybe it's splitting hairs -- but if he's just gazing intently at the crowd, it could simply look like he was in a trance...

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Amy Christopher View Post
    Metaphors can be stronger and more poetic, similies are for beginners. Like is also overused in like every like pause in like conversation and its like asking permission of the reader to make the point. It works excellently in speech, less well in description.
    Based on practically the entire body of English literature, going back to Shakespeare and probably long before that – I’d say any advice that suggests you should avoid using like or simile is something people can safely ignore.
    Last edited by JosephB; February 11th, 2013 at 03:59 PM.

  5. #15
    He gazed to the crowd, entranced.

    Or you could show us why the crowd puts the character in a trance, the sights and sounds and smells or what have you, but that all just depends on the context of what you're trying to convey, really, and the style of the rest of the work.
    Hidden Content <--Proceed with der clickity.

  6. #16
    I guess it could mean his mind is somewhere else. He's looking but not really there.
    Like in this case sounds simple. Maybe too simple.

  7. #17
    Lets all hit like to that

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Amy Christopher View Post
    Metaphors can be stronger and more poetic, similies are for beginners. Like is also overused in like every like pause in like conversation and its like asking permission of the reader to make the point. It works excellently in speech, less well in description. The trance thing is a cliche so that too would be best in direct speech. Depends on your genre though.
    There's nothing wrong with similes. A very good writer on this forum frequently and justly berates me for my neglect of them.

    It's true that "like" is used as a filler word in English, but that's not the same as using it as a preposition, and doesn't make it a bad word to use in the appropriate context.

    The OP should be using "as if" or "as though" because he needs a conjunction to connect the two verbal phrases rather than a preposition with an object. See linky in my above post if more grammatical explanation is desired.

  9. #19
    As if!

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Amy Christopher View Post
    Metaphors can be stronger and more poetic, similies are for beginners. Like is also overused in like every like pause in like conversation and its like asking permission of the reader to make the point. It works excellently in speech, less well in description. The trance thing is a cliche so that too would be best in direct speech. Depends on your genre though.
    Oh, so Neil Gaiman, Neal Stephenson, Kelly Link, Tim Pratt, Gene Wolfe, Joe R. Lansdale and R.A. Lafferty are all beginners. I shall fire off a round of emails immediately, informing them of this fact.

    Lafferty is especially going to be disappointed, since he's dead.

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