What are you reading now? - Page 8


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Thread: What are you reading now?

  1. #71
    Member Euripides's Avatar
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    The Prydain Chronicles by Lloyd Alexander.

    You know....the Black Cauldron, the second book in the series, the one that Disney butchered in the 1980's as an animated movie?

  2. #72
    Member Rustgold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chaeronia View Post
    Hi, Mary.
    Such a skeptic.

    Btw : I'm currently reading my own work too Well actually this instant it's this page, which technically does have my work in it, this line for instance; but after that, and before that is my work. Hope someone's got a headache
    Last edited by Rustgold; April 20th, 2012 at 10:12 AM.
    Caution : Doesn't come with 1698-B sanity certificate
    I'd kill for a blueberry scroll, or maim for a apple one. Alas...

  3. #73
    Basketball Diaries by Jim Carroll. At the library right now, probably check out something by Chekhov or finally get around to reading that lottery short story, I forget the author.
    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

    Hidden Content


  4. #74
    I am reading 'The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying' by Sogyal Rinpoche. I am so drawn to Tibetan Buddhism and wanting to make sense of life. It is fantastic beyond words.

    I usually have at least 6 books on the go at once though, according to mood. I cannot believe it when someone ever tells me they never read a book. I wonder how they can possibly survive!

  5. #75
    I was thinking about getting the brief and wondrous life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz, because of the style of writing apparently coincides with my tendency to speak spanglish in everyday conversation (<-- hence the flag). Has anyone read it? It's apparently good.
    "
    Forget your personal tragedy. We are all bitched from the start and you especially have to be hurt like hell before you can write seriously. But when you get the damned hurt, use it-don't cheat with it."




  6. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by grimreaper View Post
    Rereading the Lord Of The Rings and Anne Frank's Diary. Just finished the House of Night series (P.C + Kristin Cast). Really good series , so far as it has gone.
    Hi
    I love Lord of the Rings, you have reminded me that soon I too must re-read it.

  7. #77
    Member michaelschaap's Avatar
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    Lover Eternal by J.R. Ward. It must be the fourth time I have read it!

    Michael

  8. #78
    Read a terrifically good short story earlier today -- Everyday Use by Alice Walker. Fiction that good always makes me want to write.

    And I think I might be Joyce Carol Oates newest fanboy.
    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

    Hidden Content


  9. #79
    Member Camden's Avatar
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    The Stone and the Flute - Hans Bemmann
    Fiction - kind of YA, fell in love with it when I was young and try to read it once a year.
    There is no normal, simply levels of ignorance.

  10. #80
    The sword of truth by Terry Goodkind: The stone of tears.

    Found out about these books after netflix kept reccommending I watch Legends of the Seeker. Although the show was decent on a first hand watch, I now think that I know the reason it was cancelled so quickly. Though the books are great and very fun reading.

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