What are you reading now? - Page 6


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  1. #51
    One third of the way through Richard Matheson's I Am Legend. Pretty decent. The only thing it has in common with the movie seems to be the title.

    Started reading Watership Down also.
    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

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  2. #52
    I've took a brief hiatus from Nostromo and begun reading Italo Svevo's Zeno's Conscience. Fascinating read thus far.

    I also started thumbing through Cleland's Fanny Hill.

  3. #53
    Member felix's Avatar
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    Oct 2011
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    Bedfordshire, England
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    My local bookshop is closing down next week and so its stock is currently on sale for pennies. I bought a stack today.

    - The Beautiful and Damned, F. Scott Fitzgerald
    - The Mayor of Casterbridge, Thomas Hardy
    - The Plague, Albert Camus
    - Oscar Wile, Selected Poems
    - The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald
    - The Rest of the Robots, Isaac Asimov
    - King Solomon's Mines, H. Rider Haggard
    - The Fountains of Paradise, Arthur C. Clarke
    - Dracula, Bram Stoker
    - Typee, Herman Melville
    - Death in the Afternoon, Ernest Hemingway


    All for £20. Should keep me busy. I think that I'll start with Fountains of Paradise or Dracula after I've finished IT. I shall report back.
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  4. #54

  5. #55
    Member michaelschaap's Avatar
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    Apr 2012
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    Farmington, MI
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    I am reading Twilight, Breaking Dawn by Stephenie Meyer. It is the second time I have read it! Love the book!

    Michael Schaap

  6. #56
    Finished Catching Fire, the second of the Hunger Games books. Like the first installment, it left me with an empty feeling: too lightly handled for a subject matter of this nature. The horror doesn't resonate and the repetitious nature of the book's second half left me bored and anxious to get through it. The ending was disappointing: I didn't buy into the reasoning behind the reveal, which I thought was a hamfisted contrivance. I'll swerve the third and Wiki it instead.

    Just started Home Fires by Gene Wolfe, which I hear isn't his best. Hardly a criticism, though, considering he wrote the Book of the New Sun.

  7. #57
    The Investment Zoo - Stephen A. Jarislowsky

    It's about a guy, who made a lot of money.

  8. #58
    Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates.

    Masterclass on how to write good prose. I suspect I'll be reading it many times.
    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

    Hidden Content


  9. #59
    Just finished Coelho's Eleven Minutes and The Fifth Mountain. Now moving on to Ludlum's The Matarese Circle
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    GOD DOESN'T MAKE THE WORLD THIS WAY... WE DO. - RORSCHACH, WATCHMEN

  10. #60
    game of thrones book 4

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