What are you reading now? - Page 4


Page 4 of 246 FirstFirst 1234567891011121454104204 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 2455

Thread: What are you reading now?

  1. #31
    Oh, no problem. I wasn't attacking you, I just wanted to clear up a misconception.

    To be fair, I liked Battle Royale more than the first Hunger Games book, too. But I also like The Hunger Games as a series.

    Cheers

  2. #32
    (Well, We Need to Talk About Kevin was a joyful exercise in happy-go-lucky, upbeat entertainment.)

    Quote Originally Posted by KyleColorado View Post
    Oh, no problem. I wasn't attacking you
    Oh no, I didn't get that impression at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by KyleColorado View Post
    EDIT: Oh, and I looked up the summary of The Knife of Never Letting Go, and it sounds very good. Won lots of awards, too! I'm going to add it to my reading list. Are you liking it so far?
    I'm enjoying it, yep. The first-person present-tense narrative is really engaging. The writing's great, authentic and prosaic but spotted with poeticism. The plot is quite linear, nothing clever, but it doesn't matter because the central character - inspired by an interesting conceit - carries you along. Certainly recommended.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Chaeronia View Post
    I'm most of the way through The Knife of Never Letting Go - a much more successful YA story.
    Thanks for this. I was intrigued after reading the first few pages online and checked it out at the library. About fifty pages in and really enjoying it. Love Todd's relationship with Manchee. Reminds me of this guy:





    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

    Hidden Content


  4. #34
    I just finished Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides. I thoroughly enjoyed it. Has anyone read The Virgin Suicides or The Marriage Plot? I've heard good things about both but I could only buy one book, and Middlesex sounded too strange to pass up.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon M View Post
    Thanks for this. I was intrigued after reading the first few pages online and checked it out at the library. About fifty pages in and really enjoying it. Love Todd's relationship with Manchee. Reminds me of this guy:
    Did you finish it, Jon? What did you think?

    Perhaps 20 or 30 pages too long for me; just stretching itself a little thin in the closing stages. But still a most enjoyable read, with a strong lead voice and some surprisingly poignant, affecting moments.

    Most of the way through William Gibson's Zero History. I love Gibson - he's a labyrinthine bugger at times, but his prose is razor sharp and his characters are just so damned cool.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Chaeronia View Post
    Did you finish it, Jon? What did you think?
    Oh hell no. Haha. Not yet. I have something like 250 pages left. But I really like it. I'd love love love to see it made into an animated movie.
    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

    Hidden Content


  7. #37
    A David Crystal book on English, I notice he is number 10 on the guardian bookshop best seller list with his new book at £16. The blurb on my second hand bookshop book tels me he has written over ninety books, he is a prof. of English at Cambridge and a leading authority on the language. Don't waste £16, there are loads of his down the second hand shop for about £1-£1.50p, not the same title , but the same subject. He is readable and sensible though.
    Hidden Content

    A whole swathe of entertainment, all sorts of lengths, all sorts of stories, all with that 'Olly' twist.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Jon M View Post
    Oh hell no. Haha. Not yet. I have something like 250 pages left. But I really like it. I'd love love love to see it made into an animated movie.
    Ah, you're probably spending your time doing some of that there writin' business instead of procrastinating and distracting yourselves with other people's words like I am.

    I can definitely see it being picked up by a film house. An animation would be interesting - I say let Bakshi run with it.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Chaeronia View Post
    Ah, you're probably spending your time doing some of that there writin' business instead of procrastinating and distracting yourselves with other people's words like I am.
    ... and still reading The Hunger Games.
    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

    Hidden Content


  10. #40
    The Brotherhood, by Stephen Knight.

    Date published: 1984

    Date of author's death: 1985

    Duuuuuuuun, du-dun-dun! Masons!

    In all seriousness, it's an enthralling read. It's managed (so far at least- I'm halfway through) to avoid any of the absurd holes which books normally dealing in this issue tend to fall into.

    I'm also well into Emile Zola's L'assommoir and Benvenuto Cellini's autobiography.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.