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  1. #21
    Requiem for a Dream, by Selby. An intensely interesting look at four characters as they go through the stages of addiction. The writing style is, at times, stream of consciousness, often poetic, and has been a huge influence on my own style of writing.

    The movie is also pretty great.
    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

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  2. #22
    I've just started reading 'A Widow for One Year' by John Irving. Pretty good so far.
    There is no life I know
    To compare with pure imagination.
    Living there you’ll be free
    If you truly wish to be.~ Willy Wonka

  3. #23
    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    How to Fall by the poet Karen Annesen - She grew up on Cape Cod, moved to England, and now lives and works in Oxford.
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  4. #24
    About 100 pages in to the Hunger Games. So far, I don't know. I approached the book with an open mind. Liked the first couple of pages, the thing about the cat, and then once I figured out it's all very much like the Roman gladiator games, kind of lost interest.

    Writing style is nothing special.
    "The only calibration that counts is how much heart people invest, how much they ignore their fears of being hurt or caught out or humiliated. And the only thing people regret is that they didn't live boldly enough, that they didn't invest enough heart, didn't love enough. Nothing else really counts at all. It was a saying about noble figures in old Irish poems—he would give his hawk to any man that asked for it, yet he loved his hawk better than men nowadays love their bride of tomorrow. He would mourn a dog with more grief than men nowadays mourn their fathers.

    And that's how we measure out our real respect for people—by the degree of feeling they can register, the voltage of life they can carry and tolerate—and enjoy.
    "

    Live like a mighty river: a letter from Ted Hughes to his son, Nicholas

    Hidden Content


  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by johnM View Post
    About 100 pages in to the Hunger Games. So far, I don't know. I approached the book with an open mind. Liked the first couple of pages, the thing about the cat, and then once I figured out it's all very much like the Roman gladiator games, kind of lost interest.

    Writing style is nothing special.
    I felt the same way! I thought the writing was actually very amateurish for the whole beginning hundred pages or so of the book. And I got quite bored with all the clothes and food talk. But once the games actually begin, it gets quite engaging (or at least it did for me).

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by johnM View Post
    About 100 pages in to the Hunger Games. So far, I don't know. I approached the book with an open mind. Liked the first couple of pages, the thing about the cat, and then once I figured out it's all very much like the Roman gladiator games, kind of lost interest.

    Writing style is nothing special.
    For a book concerned with children murdering one another, it's a jarringly light read. A diluted, ersatz Battle Royale. Left me with no desire to follow the series through.

    I'm most of the way through The Knife of Never Letting Go - a much more successful YA story.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Chaeronia View Post
    For a book concerned with children murdering one another, it's a jarringly light read. A diluted, ersatz Battle Royale. Left me with no desire to follow the series through.

    I'm most of the way through The Knife of Never Letting Go - a much more successful YA story.
    In response to Battle Royale (I have that book, too ), while the premises are quite similar, the Hunger Games series takes the characters in a different direction. In BR the characters fight to escape. In THG the characters turn the other direction and wage war to begin a revolution.

    Think:

    Neo --> The Matrix --> The Machines ::: Katniss --> The Games --> Panem

    The first book deals with The Games, the first level of control, just as the first Matrix dealt with the matrix itself, the first level of control. But the machines (Panem) is where the real battle takes place, further along in the series.

    I'm aware not everyone likes The Hunger Games, and I'm not trying to convince you otherwise.. but I've seen the Battle Royale mention a lot and I think it's a reasonable, though slightly inaccurate comparison.

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by KyleColorado View Post
    I'm aware not everyone likes The Hunger Games, and I'm not trying to convince you otherwise.. but I've seen the Battle Royale mention a lot and I think it's a reasonable, though slightly inaccurate comparison.
    I'm not saying The Hunger Games is inferior to Battle Royale because it shares a similar storyline; I don't hold this against Collins (it's not as if Battle Royale doesn't owe a debt to various predecessors, though perhaps not as brazen). I just don't think The Hunger Games is as good.

    EDIT: That said, your comment about the story spreading to a wider, political rebellion is intriguing, so I might pick up the second in the series at some point.
    Last edited by Chaeronia; March 2nd, 2012 at 10:11 PM.

  9. #29
    Yeah, I hear you. It's well within your right to like whatever you like!

    Though, this is incorrect:

    Quote Originally Posted by Chaeronia
    I'm not saying The Hunger Games is inferior to Battle Royale because it shares a similar storyline; I don't hold this against Collins (it's not as if Battle Royale doesn't owe a debt to various predecessors, though perhaps not as brazen).
    The assumption that Collins drew her inspiration from Battle Royale is a logical one, but it's incorrect. She stated in an interview she had never heard of Battle Royale until she was already well into writing her second book of the series.

    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne Collins, speaking about Battle Royale
    I had never heard of that book or that author until my book was turned in. At that point, it was mentioned to me, and I asked my editor if I should read it. He said: ‘No, I don’t want that world in your head. Just continue with what you’re doing.’
    She came up with The Hunger Games concept while watching reality television, and news coverage of the war in Iraq. For the Games she was inspired by the Greek Mythos of the Minotaur Labyrinth (where children were sent to their deaths).

    The similarities between Battle Royale and The Hunger Games are striking, but coincidental.

    I think the parallel nature of the two novels represents something deeper than two writers with harmonious creations. It speaks to a collective awareness about violence and subjugation in modern society, but that's going into a more thematic discussion

    EDIT: Oh, and I looked up the summary of The Knife of Never Letting Go, and it sounds very good. Won lots of awards, too! I'm going to add it to my reading list. Are you liking it so far?
    Last edited by Kyle R; March 2nd, 2012 at 09:26 PM.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by KyleColorado View Post
    Yeah, I hear you. It's well within your right to like whatever you like!

    Though, this is incorrect:

    The assumption that Collins drew her inspiration from Battle Royale is a logical one, but it's incorrect. She stated in an interview she had never heard of Battle Royale until she was already well into writing her second book of the series.

    She came up with The Hunger Games concept while watching reality television, and news coverage of the war in Iraq. For the Games she was inspired by the Greek Mythos of the Minotaur Labyrinth (where children were sent to their deaths).

    The similarities between Battle Royale and The Hunger Games are striking, but coincidental.

    I think the parallel nature of the two novels represents something deeper than two writers with harmonious creations. It speaks to a collective awareness about violence and subjugation in modern society, but that's going into a more thematic discussion
    Sorry, bad word choice on my part. I mean startling rather than brazen. I'd read she had no prior knowledge of Battle Royale before finishing The Hunger Games.

    I'll come back to you about TKONLG - I'm currently disturbing my other half's enjoyment of her film with all this tapping! (We Need To Talk About Kevin... light-hearted Friday night fun!)
    Last edited by Chaeronia; March 2nd, 2012 at 11:51 PM.

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