What are you reading now? - Page 242


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Thread: What are you reading now?

  1. #2411
    I'm compiling a list of favorite/ recommended poetry/ flash fiction "how to" books and the book I'm presently exploring (again) is Robert Hass's A Little Book on Form: An Exploration into the Formal Imagination of Poetry (2017). Hass is a Pulitzer Prize Winner (and winner of many writing awards) and clearly demonstrates his skill as a writer. I will definitely include this book in my list of recommendations. It's quite an interesting book and I was rather surprised to discover that.
    Free Download of My Chapbook: Flash Fiction: A Primer
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  2. #2412
    Doesn't Murakami seem fixated on cats? I haven't read any of his works but have read a little about them in random places. Curious you find it reminds you of A Passage to India....
    ​Morii

  3. #2413
    I just found an Elif Shafak novel with excellent reviews at my virtual library which I plan to read now. Will see how it "feels" to me. It's called The Forty Rules of Love. It's about Rumi and his companion and tells two parallel stories in the context of two different cultures and time periods.
    ​Morii

  4. #2414
    @Neetu - If you are a fan of historical fiction but not fussed about the country of origin then a series of books by C J Sansom featuring a character called Shardlake is excellent - wonderfully written.

  5. #2415
    Deleted. Accidental double posting.
    Last edited by Neetu; January 18th, 2021 at 10:09 PM.
    ​Morii

  6. #2416
    Quote Originally Posted by Monaque View Post
    @Neetu - If you are a fan of historical fiction but not fussed about the country of origin then a series of books by C J Sansom featuring a character called Shardlake is excellent - wonderfully written.
    Monaque, I am a fan of historical fiction! And my goodness, to fuss about the country of origin would diminish me as a reader! I have found such incredible power in many of these books from all sorts of countries as long as they are in English. It gives me insight into cultures and attitudes far more interesting than in the plain reading of historical texts. Thank you for the recommendation. I will absolutely look it up and see if I can get it at one of the libraries I am member of.
    ​Morii

  7. #2417
    Quote Originally Posted by Neetu View Post
    Monaque, I am a fan of historical fiction! And my goodness, to fuss about the country of origin would diminish me as a reader! I have found such incredible power in many of these books from all sorts of countries as long as they are in English. It gives me insight into cultures and attitudes far more interesting than in the plain reading of historical texts. Thank you for the recommendation. I will absolutely look it up and see if I can get it at one of the libraries I am member of.
    No worries, I'm sure you will enjoy them.

  8. #2418
    I'm reading Left Hand of Darkness by Le Guin, and to be honest, I don't really care for it.

    It feels like an adjective soup. She hits you with word after word after word telling you how things went, but I do not feel that most of the events were actually made to transpire using words.

    It's an interesting world and you're almost guaranteed to learn a few vocabulary words, so at least there's that.

  9. #2419
    Quote Originally Posted by EternalGreen View Post
    I'm reading Left Hand of Darkness by Le Guin, and to be honest, I don't really care for it.

    It feels like an adjective soup. She hits you with word after word after word telling you how things went, but I do not feel that most of the events were actually made to transpire using words.

    It's an interesting world and you're almost guaranteed to learn a few vocabulary words, so at least there's that.
    She's supposed to be good, in the top whatever books to read she's always in there.

  10. #2420
    Anxious People by Fredrik Backman.

    I'm about halfway through, and I love it. It manages to pull off being simultaneously hilarious and breath-takingly poignant. Also, I love the way it's told, almost like a fairy tale--one where the narrator might be a little shady. Definitely recommend!

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