What are you reading now? - Page 216


Thread: What are you reading now?

  1. #2151
    Been trying to bolster my pinko cred by plowing through Schlesinger Jr. Did Jackson and the first volume of FDR and am over halfway through the second. The first two were pretty easy biography and politics but this one's a detailed legislative history of the New Deal and a real bugger to follow. Many characters. My main impression is of the incomprehensible minutia of national governance and the takeaway seems likely to be an increased impatience with the superficiality of public political discourse.
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. Steven Wright

  2. #2152
    My main impression is of the incomprehensible minutia of national governance and the takeaway seems likely to be an increased impatience with the superficiality of public political discourse.
    That made me smile.

    I like a bit of biography, one of the books I have going is 'The turn of the tide' by Arthur Bryant, it is a biography of Allen Brook taken from his diaries. At the moment he has evacuated the BEF from France, twice, and is now in charge of building army defences in case of an invasion. The conflict of traditional and modern (for 1940) tactics is interesting. Bryant is a bit 1950's gung ho British in his presentation, but he always writes well and is easy to read.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    Hidden Content

    A thread of links useful to writers wishing to learn
    Piglet's picks. Hidden Content

  3. #2153
    I'm oogling over these books everyone is reading. Time for the public library, Openlibrary.org, Gutenberg, and purchases!

  4. #2154
    America Before by Graham Hancock. A meeting between bizarre archaeology and malarky.


  5. #2155
    I'm rereading "Tarantula" by Bob Dylan
    I'd forgotten how funny he was
    back in the 60's
    I'm getting nostalgic for beat poetry,
    and San Francisco. I asked someone
    on the bus 10 years ago or more
    It they had read any of Bob Kaufman's books
    like "Ancient Rain"? They said, who's he?
    Right, who's he? Now I know I'm dead
    and I don't know it or give a damn.
    That was too long ago to count pods.

    Well have a good day or a good night
    wherever you are. And remember
    Timbuktu was a big city one time
    with a great library. Now the books
    are buried in the desert. No lie.
    The desert is gathering ancient knowledge
    from the sands of time. If you ask
    they say their keeping the books safe.
    Any one of the books is worth
    half a million or more. We should
    have a bank account like that.

    Wear your bow tie and keep your
    snowshoes buckled tight. Smiles.
    I might get the hang of Bob yet
    if I keep working at it in the dark.

  6. #2156
    Started reading The Once and Future King by T. H. White.

    Two chapters in and already wondering whether to put it down. It has references and analogies completely out of time and place for an Arthurian story: a mention of Eton College jarred pretty hard, slap-stick comedy when we first meet Sir Pellinore, Merlin talking about electric and water companies and the Knights all saying 'What, what, good ol' port this, what do you say ol' chap?...' like they belong to some good old boys club rather than medieval knights. What's going on?

    I picked it up because it was one of the most highly recommended books of modern Arthurian retellings. Anyone else read it? Worth persevering with?

  7. #2157
    Quote Originally Posted by epimetheus View Post
    Started reading The Once and Future King by T. H. White.

    Two chapters in and already wondering whether to put it down. It has references and analogies completely out of time and place for an Arthurian story: a mention of Eton College jarred pretty hard, slap-stick comedy when we first meet Sir Pellinore, Merlin talking about electric and water companies and the Knights all saying 'What, what, good ol' port this, what do you say ol' chap?...' like they belong to some good old boys club rather than medieval knights. What's going on?

    I picked it up because it was one of the most highly recommended books of modern Arthurian retellings. Anyone else read it? Worth persevering with?
    A bit tongue in cheek, but I have always enjoyed it. There are two versions, the first was written as a children's book, that was read to me as a child, and then it was re-written as an adult book , first of a trilogy, 'The ill made knight' which is about Lancelot and 'The queen of air and darkness' about Morgan le Fey.
    Persevere a bit, it is the education of Art by introducing him to the different animal societies that is the cream of it for me, remember Arthurian legend is just that, legend, the real knights of medieval history were a bunch of murderous thugs. The stories are not history, just how someone would have liked it to be, an T H White's version is the same.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    Hidden Content

    A thread of links useful to writers wishing to learn
    Piglet's picks. Hidden Content

  8. #2158
    The Divine Invasion by Philip K. Dick, Petrarch's Sonnets & Songs (Italian-English Edition), The History of the Medieval World by Susan Wise Bauer, and-- still, A Column of Fire by Ken Follett.

    The Divine Invasion is better than the first VALIS book. Dick is a meth-fueled crackpot, but his writing really comes out strong and unique at times. Petrarch is REALLY impressing me, I've never quite seen poetry so fluid, longing, and mesmerizing. Bauer's historical book is one of the finest I've seen in a while, and A Column of Fire has its share of intrigues and suspense that I've come to know, and love, about his writing.

    All in all, a good reading list for me ATM. I've got my new job now, but some debt that I have to work on is going to prevent me from buying anything new for a bit. Luckily, my local library, OpenLibrary (man I love that site) and other resources are enabling me to get plenty of material. It's been quite a while since I've bought a book, but I'm starting to feel the fever.

    Must work harder... wait, wasn't that what Boxer said in Animal Farm?

    *Finished the libretto of Aida, with the commentary and analysis. I like reading them: a fusion between poetry and drama.*

    *UPDATED* Reading The Best Short Stories of the Century- Edited by John Updike and Katrina Kenison.
    Last edited by Bard_Daniel; May 16th, 2019 at 02:55 AM.

  9. #2159
    ref post 2128, this thread, pg 213
    whole stack omitted, compile
    approx 5 per week


    Spy by Ted Bell
    Alexander Hawke Series, 4/10
    This series does well with presenting contemporary
    context not experienced directly by many readers.
    The series considers such pertinent ideas
    as manipulation of hardware (Tsar).
    This particular novel speaks to one
    of the popular/escalating "tensions".
    Worth revisiting, imho.


    The Code Girls by Daisy Styles
    Yes.
    Read it.

    Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson
    One year process of recovery by 13 year old assault survivor.
    Yes.
    Read it.
    Gift it.

    The Power by Naomi Alderman
    "In 2012, Alderman was selected as a protégée by Margaret Atwood as part of the Rolex Mentor and Protégé Arts Initiative, an international philanthropic programme that pairs masters in their disciplines with emerging talents for a year of one-to-one creative exchange."
    per wiki
    One critical schism, imho.


    *considers next list of incoming*

  10. #2160
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Manchester, England
    Posts
    57
    Cross Her Heart, Sarah Pinborough. tis fooking aces

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