What are you reading now? - Page 108

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Thread: What are you reading now?

  1. #1071
    WF Veteran Gyarachu's Avatar
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    Words of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson, second book in the Stormlight Archive.

    It's good, and thus far in the series there have been hints of epicness to come, but I'm actually getting sort of tired of his style. It seems like he writes his books where nothing really happens until the end, and it's all just biding time until then. Plus the story just doesn't feel "big" enough, and at times I have trouble believing the characters. I can't really say why. He does get some serious bonus points for sheer originality and creativity, though.

    I'll keep reading, hoping the potential he hints at will be realized.
    "Fantasy is the literature of hope. In fantasy there is a belief that you can make a difference. Today may be bleak, but you can live through today. And tomorrow will be better. And maybe there'll be a different darkness tomorrow, but you can live through that, too, and you can make the light come, and the darkness go away. It doesn't matter how many times the darkness comes. There is always hope for something better." ~Robert Jordan

    "Some day you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again." ~C.S. Lewis

  2. #1072
    Nos4a2, by Joe Hill.
    “Fools” said I, “You do not know
    Silence like a cancer grows
    Hear my words that I might teach you
    Take my arms that I might reach you”
    But my words like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed in the wells of silence : Simon & Garfunkel


    Those who enjoy stirring the chamber-pot should be required to lick the spoon.

    Our job as writers is to make readers dream, to infiltrate their minds with our words and create a new reality; a reality not theirs, and not ours, but a new, unique combination of both.

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  3. #1073
    Doc by Mary Doria Russell- about 3/4 through and is so far the best book on the Dodge City clan I've read.

    The Years of the Forest by Helen Hoover - a couple lives in a cabin in Minnesota for a few decades. I enjoy the book, but for some reason it's just not complete. Can't put my finger on it. And I really can't get completely into it. I find myself skipping paragraphs often.

    Slaughterhouse Five - it's been about a decade since I've read it and wow. What an experience.

    Blue Highways by William Least Heat Moon - road trip masterpiece. And a fine first novel.
    Last edited by tabasco5; October 10th, 2014 at 01:31 AM. Reason: felt like it
    The beauty of writing is in the well crafted sentence.

  4. #1074
    Not That Kind of Girl - Lena Dunham This is freaking hilarious. Makes me want to get back into writing creative nonfiction again
    "art: as the spirit wanes the form appears" - Charles Bukowski
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  5. #1075
    Irvine Welsh - Skagboys
    It all starts with a name and flows from there. A ridiculous moniker springs to mind and it launches like a multi-lubed slippery-sloop down chutes made of buttery-floops. Down, down, down. We watch, spellbound. Rapturous. Glockenspiel. We do our due diligence with penitence and penicillin. Do what’s due, then dew drops on your moon-pops.


  6. #1076
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    I just put in some new bookshelves, and while I was reorganizing, I picked up On the Road and started reading it. I loved it in high school, which is fairly typical. I didn't expect that I would like it as much now, and I was right.

    There are still many exhilarating passages that are a pleasure to read, but I didn't remember that it could be so repetitive. I also didn't see Dean Moriarty as such an annoying, frustrating character. I suppose when you're a kid, it's easy to romanticize that kind of selfishness and irresponsibility. Any allure Dean Moriarty/Niel Cassady held for Kerouac or whatever inspiration he provided, the plausibility of it didn't really come across to me in this second reading.

    Still, it was worth the reread, almost for the wonderful stretches of poetic description alone. One bit where Kerouac describes the musicians and performance of a jazz band gave me goosebumps. Truly inspiring.

  7. #1077
    The Ballad of a Sad Cafe..."a hunchback coming down the road"...man how do you thinks she could work that into a story but she does
    The only one who can heal you is you.




  8. #1078
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    Quote Originally Posted by escorial View Post
    The Ballad of a Sad Cafe..."a hunchback coming down the road"...man how do you thinks she could work that into a story but she does
    That was a good read. I think it was supposed to be almost mythical, or like a tall tale, but the end came off as a little cartoonish to me; a little bit of a letdown.

    I loved The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. It's one of my favorites. I really enjoyed A Member of the Wedding too. I found Reflections in a Golden Eye to be pretty tedious, and I had a really hard time slogging through Clock Without Hands. Flannery O'Connor said it was the worst book she ever read. Then again, she panned To Kill a Mockingbird.

  9. #1079
    Quote Originally Posted by E. Zamora View Post
    That was a good read. I think it was supposed to be almost mythical, or like a tall tale, but the end came off as a little cartoonish to me; a little bit of a letdown.

    I loved The Heart is a Lonely Hunter. It's one of my favorites. I really enjoyed A Member of the Wedding too. I found Reflections in a Golden Eye to be pretty tedious, and I had a really hard time slogging through Clock Without Hands. Flannery O'Connor said it was the worst book she ever read. Then again, she panned To Kill a Mockingbird.
    enjoying the way she has turned the hunchback from a sad,pathetic individual to someone who feels he is now above that ..about half way into the story myself..The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter is very similar in many ways...still i think is it to obvious to reason why he shot himself without trying to over think it..A Member of the Wedding felt like the first part of The Heart is a Lonely Hunter..her remaining works i look forward to reading.
    The only one who can heal you is you.




  10. #1080
    Quote Originally Posted by E. Zamora View Post
    I just put in some new bookshelves, and while I was reorganizing, I picked up On the Road and started reading it. I loved it in high school, which is fairly typical. I didn't expect that I would like it as much now, and I was right.

    There are still many exhilarating passages that are a pleasure to read, but I didn't remember that it could be so repetitive. I also didn't see Dean Moriarty as such an annoying, frustrating character. I suppose when you're a kid, it's easy to romanticize that kind of selfishness and irresponsibility. Any allure Dean Moriarty/Niel Cassady held for Kerouac or whatever inspiration he provided, the plausibility of it didn't really come across to me in this second reading.

    Still, it was worth the reread, almost for the wonderful stretches of poetic description alone. One bit where Kerouac describes the musicians and performance of a jazz band gave me goosebumps. Truly inspiring.
    I love the road trips, which is...I guess the point. I agree with you about Dean and I see him as a tragic character. Somebody you love for his free spiritedness, but he sputters out like an empty tank of gas. How Kerouac wrote it is inspiring as anything.
    Anything that doesn't take years off your life and drives you to suicide hardly seems worth doing.
    - Cormac Mccarthy

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