Clichés in Writing?


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Thread: Clichés in Writing?

  1. #1
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    Question Clichés in Writing?

    Are cliches FUN or dated as the word seems to suggest?
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    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    Deja vu all over again...
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  3. #3
    I think if possible, other ways to word things are usually best. Sometimes, I think they're necessary. I just used a cliche statement in my last chapter for my story on purpose!

    "Yes, if it means being with you." I ignored the cliche nature of her statement and just let the happy butterflies swim in my stomach.

    Because she spoke it, I consider it different than it being apart of the narrative. I had a reason for it, but it's hard to say.

    What's the fun in being a circle among other circles? I want to be a square.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloggsworth View Post
    Deja vu all over again...
    I tend to fall into that pitfall of thinking that stereotypes are part of or like cliches since you mentioned dejavus...
    Quote Originally Posted by Dramatism View Post
    I think if possible, other ways to word things are usually best. Sometimes, I think they're necessary. I just used a cliche statement in my last chapter for my story on purpose!

    "Yes, if it means being with you." I ignored the cliche nature of her statement and just let the happy butterflies swim in my stomach.

    Because she spoke it, I consider it different than it being apart of the narrative. I had a reason for it, but it's hard to say.

    I consider cliches to be more of a deeper statement to just a dialogue.
    Dialogues in real life contains cliches such as the 'butterfly one' or others like 'it went over my head.
    It is almost a form of prose with metaphors of their own rights.

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    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    Nacian, here's one for you to decode:- "She's no better than she should be..."
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  6. #6
    I think cliches can be either noise or signal, depending how they're used. The reason cliches become cliches is that they contain truth-value. Otherwise people wouldn't repeat them into cliche-hood.

    That said, you also want to demonstrate beyond-the-box thinking. "Hotter than Hell," is boring. It's a good image, but if you want to show your skills as a writer, you'll find a more creative way to describe it. But if you're putting it in a charactger's mouth, then, "It was hotter than Hell the day that Brady kid..." works. Because real people, most of them, speak cliche.
    Everything you want is just outside your comfort zone.
    — Robert G. Allen

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by astroannie View Post
    Because real people, most of them, speak cliche.
    That's exactly what I was talking about! (I have been misunderstood on forums before, so when I say this, I am screaming with a 'yes, thank you for pointing out what I didn't think of in words')
    What's the fun in being a circle among other circles? I want to be a square.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloggsworth View Post
    Nacian, here's one for you to decode:- "She's no better than she should be..."
    yes I have come across this..a bit like '' he's no better then he ought to be''
    as in no improvement made.
    Quote Originally Posted by astroannie View Post
    I think cliches can be either noise or signal, depending how they're used. The reason cliches become cliches is that they contain truth-value. Otherwise people wouldn't repeat them into cliche-hood.

    That said, you also want to demonstrate beyond-the-box thinking. "Hotter than Hell," is boring. It's a good image, but if you want to show your skills as a writer, you'll find a more creative way to describe it. But if you're putting it in a charactger's mouth, then, "It was hotter than Hell the day that Brady kid..." works. Because real people, most of them, speak cliche.
    I am thinking prose here or purple prose.
    But aren't some words like 'Hell' self descriptive?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dramatism View Post
    That's exactly what I was talking about! (I have been misunderstood on forums before, so when I say this, I am screaming with a 'yes, thank you for pointing out what I didn't think of in words')
    you have been misunderstood as in you needed to put more cliches on in your posts?
    Sorry I am not following
    Last edited by Nacian; December 29th, 2011 at 06:09 PM.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Nacian View Post
    you have been misunderstood as in you needed to put more cliches on in your posts?
    Sorry I am not following
    I could be misunderstood in the way the words could be said. I didn't mean 'hey, that's what I was talking about'. I meant a positive connotation, and I for saw that someone could think the negative version.
    What's the fun in being a circle among other circles? I want to be a square.

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  10. #10
    six of one, half dozen of the other . . . .

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