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Thread: Grammar!

  1. #21
    Tomorrow, she will be back where she started

    0


    Tomorrow she would be back where she had started.

    Why did you use 'will' ? why not keep it two tenses? Or was this just an example? I think 'had' would solidify the past perfectly, a moment spent.

    Interesting thread

    Thanks for the reads

    S

  2. #22
    Honoured/Sadly Missed The Backward OX's Avatar
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    This is not really the place for a history question, but what the hell,

    As an unnecessary addition to your answer, the navy has provided the English language with a good spicing of useful words. Loose cannons like yourself should be aware of this.
    Quite right. It isnít a history thread. My apologies. It is however a grammar thread: loose cannons is plural, yourself is singular. Go and sit in the corner.

  3. #23
    Tomorrow she would be back where she had started.

    Why did you use 'will' ? why not keep it two tenses? Or was this just an example? I think 'had' would solidify the past perfectly, a moment spent.
    Hi Sey,
    This was an example of giving a narrator a 'naturalistic voice.' It is not strictly correct, but it is perfectly understandable. There is a fine line between making a reader feel at home and being so correct it dulls the prose.

    I have just read the last paragraph, and it is pompous. Sorry.

  4. #24
    Quite right. It isn’t a history thread. My apologies. It is however a grammar thread: loose cannons is plural, yourself is singular. Go and sit in the corner.
    A loose cannon like yourself, A loose cannon like yourself, A loose cannon like yourself, A loose cannon like yourself, A loose cannon like yourself, A loose cannon like yourself, A loose cannon like yourself, A loose cannon like yourself, A loose cannon like yourself.

    Every day I learn something. How long must I stand in the corner?

  5. #25
    Of course it is understandable, but that does not make it the best way, or the most refined way to use those words. This is the point I am making and why examples are so hard to word 'correctly' and why we ask such questions as these.

    Carry on. There is nothing wrong with a corner - two sides support you and guard your back. It can be both defensive and offensive.

  6. #26
    WF Veteran Bloggsworth's Avatar
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    The only Grammer that ever made sense to me was Kelsey...
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  7. #27
    The only Grammar that ever made sense to me was Kelsey...
    Try Graham King.

    Of course it is understandable, but that does not make it the best way, or the most refined way to use those words. This is the point I am making and why examples are so hard to word 'correctly' and why we ask such questions as these.

    Carry on. There is nothing wrong with a corner - two sides support you and guard your back. It can be both defensive and offensive.
    That I am not the most qualified person to try this is readily apparent. I keep feeling like someone is pointing a finger at me and calling me a fraud. Oh! it's me.
    One thing for sure, I am going to learn more by trying than by running away.

  8. #28
    I always liked graham crackers, not sure why but I do.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by The Backward OX View Post
    Go and sit in the corner.
    LOL.
    "The greatest achievement was at first and for a time a dream. The oak sleeps in the acorn, the bird waits in the egg, and in the highest vision of the soul a waking angel stirs. Dreams are the seedlings of realities." ~ James Allen

    "Use what talents you possess: the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best." ~ Henry Van Dyke

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by bazz cargo View Post
    This is not really the place for a history question, but what the hell, seeing as it is you, the mighty Xo asking.

    Jack is the name that permeates British popular culture the most: Jack n Jill, Jack o'lantern, Jack Sh*t, Jack in the box, and so on. Tar is what wooden ships used to smear on ropes, and everything else that would quite happily rot. Including their clothing and hair. My assumption is some wag stuck the two together and came up with Jack Tar.

    The old sailing ships required teams of Jack Tars to climb up the big stick things, and unfurl the sails by hand. They had to do this in a hurry, so they would 'run up the sails.'

    As an unnecessary addition to your answer, the navy has provided the English language with a good spicing of useful words. Loose cannons like yourself should be aware of this.
    I actually researched this once to learn the origin of jackass. Jack, in the British Navy, referred to the penis (i.e. peter, willie, Johnson, etc.) and the sailors used the analogy on anything they considered male. The british flag, called a union jack, was not flown on the mast while in port, but was flown on the bow on a "jack" or pole. These sailors also used tar in their hair (to keep the lice out) and they became known as Jack Tars. The flap on the back of their jerseys (shirts to you landlubbers) kept the tar from seeping through to their backs. The men (usually small and agile) who ran up the masts, were called rigging monkeys, the ship's boys, who carried powder and shot up to the cannon, were called powder monkeys, while the deck crew, who did the heavy hauling and dirty work became deck apes.

    There are other theories, perhaps, but this one makes the most sense to me.

    take care,

    JohnB

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