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Thread: The English Language Discussion Thread

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backward OX View Post
    Would it make you happier if I deleted the crossed-out ducks? It's an English-language slang joke, don't worry about it.
    it would make me happier if you actually explained what it actually means.
    slang canbe masterd too you know.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bloggsworth View Post
    Nacian,

    English is made up of Irish, Welsh, Scottish (both vernacular and Gaelic), Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, German (Ancient & Modern), Polish, Russian, Dutch, French, Spanish, Italian, Greek (Both ancient & modern), Turkish, Arabic, Latin, Hindi, Gutjerati, Tamil, Ceylonese, Malay, Burmese, Chinse (Both Mandarin & Cantonese), Japanese, Polynesean, Aborigine, Maori, Apache, Navaho, Souix..... Shall I go on Nacian? To learn English you have to learn the whole of English with all its idiosyncrasies , one by one...
    You forgot Irish Gaelic, Icelandic and Mississippian.

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backward OX View Post
    'Toupee' is pronounced 'two-pay'. 'Recipe' is pronounced 'ressa-pee'. Are you sure you understand the meaning of the word 'syllable'?
    okay maybe Toupee was the wrong for it although if spelt with two EE it should be pronounced TOUPEE .
    the whole point of adding another E is to stress the pronunciation of the E.
    here is another word
    RUPEE
    and
    RECIPEE makes more sense to me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bloggsworth View Post
    Nacian,

    English is made up of Irish, Welsh, Scottish (both vernacular and Gaelic), Norwegian, Danish, Swedish, German (Ancient & Modern), Polish, Russian, Dutch, French, Spanish, Italian, Greek (Both ancient & modern), Turkish, Arabic, Latin, Hindi, Gutjerati, Tamil, Ceylonese, Malay, Burmese, Chinse (Both Mandarin & Cantonese), Japanese, Polynesean, Aborigine, Maori, Apache, Navaho, Souix..... Shall I go on Nacian? To learn English you have to learn the whole of English with all its idiosyncrasies , one by one...
    no no need to go on I see exactly what you mean but as I said it is the little details in words that gets to me plus where is the fun in learning if questions are not asked.
    in the same way that I wonder why French is a sexist language.
    Last edited by TheFuhrer02; October 20th, 2011 at 03:29 PM.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nacian View Post
    it would make me happier if you actually explained what it actually means.
    slang canbe masterd too you know.
    Look up the word 'turkey' in a thesaurus or dictionary.

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    well OX I have and it does prioritise meat over country from the look.
    there is another word I am totally at loss with which came first turkey or the tukey? and I would say the bird did according to the thesausrus as its entry indicate.
    still why on earth would you call a bird a country..
    anyway I did ..was I suppose to notice something?
    Last edited by Nacian; October 20th, 2011 at 12:31 PM.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nacian View Post
    I wonder why French is a sexist language.
    Do you mean all that 'le' and 'la' stuff, or something more profound?

    If the first - 'le' and 'la' - French nouns have gender because Latin words had gender, and French developed from Latin.

    If the second - something more profound - why do they call Paris the city of love?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nacian View Post
    well OX I have and it does prioritise meat over country from the look.
    there is another word I am totally at loss with which came first turkey or the tukey? and I would say the bird did according to the thesausrus as its entry indicate.
    still why on earth would you call a bird a country..
    anyway I did ..was I suppose to notice something?
    Sheeesh! Look up the slang meaning.
    Last edited by TheFuhrer02; October 20th, 2011 at 03:30 PM.

  7. #17
    Nacian - English is an extreme example, but in fact you will find that no language, not even the most logical such as Spanish or Koine Greek, can be reduced to mathematical precision. When you speak of maths you speak of the constants of the universe, immutable laws not of man's devising and not subject to man's revision. There's an interesting article on one attempt to revise nature here.

    For many of us our first lessons in pure logic occur in geometry class. A textbook on geometry written a thousand years ago would be valid today, except that the language would have to be translated into modern speech. The principles regarding circles, angles, and such would, however, need no translation. They are unchanging, immutable.

    Languages do change. Languages mutate, evolve, blossom in unexpected ways to meet the needs of every new generation. Only a language that is no longer in daily use will remain the same, year after year. Even in such a case, underlying meaning will shift with the passage of time. I can translate Caesar's words easily enough, but can I translate Caesar's thoughts? I am not of his age. I do not know the street value of every word and every combination of words as Caesar knew them. So even if you consider the language of Caesar to have a mathematical precision, you cannot apply the logic of mathematics to the words he left us.

    People create languages. People change languages. When I was a child I often heard my grandmother fondly recall the 'gay nineties', a decade when she was a young woman. 'We were all so gay in those days', was the kind of comment she would make. Such an expression would have an altogether different meaning today. The meaning of a word has been changed. But the relationship of the circumference of a circle to its diameter has not changed, has never changed, will never change.

    To understand language you must forget mathematics and study people.
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backward OX View Post
    Do you mean all that 'le' and 'la' stuff, or something more profound?

    If the first - 'le' and 'la' - French nouns have gender because Latin words had gender, and French developed from Latin.

    If the second - something more profound - why do they call Paris the city of love?

    no OX I meant this.
    in French we use il for masculin and elle for feminin as you know.
    now you would refer to a group of women as ELLES in the plural
    you would refer to a group of men as ILS
    but
    if one men joined that group of women then the whole word changes to ILS to refer to the group.
    but if one women joined that group of men the word will still stand as ILS
    bascially it takes one masculin to turn a feminin into a masculin.
    does that make sense?

    Quote Originally Posted by The Backward OX View Post
    Sheeesh! Look up the slang meaning.
    LOL
    that is not fair OX..I am only trying to understand my enviroment in order to fit in better.
    so off I go lookingit up again and in SLANG this time
    Last edited by TheFuhrer02; October 20th, 2011 at 03:31 PM.

  9. #19
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    I may be meeting an old school friend this evening, the Professor of Linguistics at one of the London Universities - I don't think I will show him this thread, he might explode before he has had time to buy his round....
    A man in possession of a wooden spoon must be in want of a pot to stir.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Backward OX View Post
    Sheeesh! Look up the slang meaning.
    not having any luck...so I still do not the meaning of crossing a word and leaving there

    Quote Originally Posted by garza View Post
    Nacian - English is an extreme example, but in fact you will find that no language, not even the most logical such as Spanish or Koine Greek, can be reduced to mathematical precision. When you speak of maths you speak of the constants of the universe, immutable laws not of man's devising and not subject to man's revision. There's an interesting article on one attempt to revise nature here.

    For many of us our first lessons in pure logic occur in geometry class. A textbook on geometry written a thousand years ago would be valid today, except that the language would have to be translated into modern speech. The principles regarding circles, angles, and such would, however, need no translation. They are unchanging, immutable.

    Languages do change. Languages mutate, evolve, blossom in unexpected ways to meet the needs of every new generation. Only a language that is no longer in daily use will remain the same, year after year. Even in such a case, underlying meaning will shift with the passage of time. I can translate Caesar's words easily enough, but can I translate Caesar's thoughts? I am not of his age. I do not know the street value of every word and every combination of words as Caesar knew them. So even if you consider the language of Caesar to have a mathematical precision, you cannot apply the logic of mathematics to the words he left us.

    People create languages. People change languages. When I was a child I often heard my grandmother fondly recall the 'gay nineties', a decade when she was a young woman. 'We were all so gay in those days', was the kind of comment she would make. Such an expression would have an altogether different meaning today. The meaning of a word has been changed. But the relationship of the circumference of a circle to its diameter has not changed, has never changed, will never change.

    To understand language you must forget mathematics and study people.
    thank you garza I shall attempt to understand the article...it already looks like a challlenge.haha.
    yes I agree that languages evolve however just because it does does itmean the spelling must evolve too?
    after all the alphabet does not change so why should spelling?
    Last edited by TheFuhrer02; October 20th, 2011 at 03:31 PM.

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