The Use of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Page 4


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Thread: The Use of Abbreviations and Acronyms

  1. #31
    All I can say is, for over 50 years I sold all I could write and lived comfortably - continue to live comfortably - on the proceeds.
    You wrote in a particular way for a particular market, that you were successful at it may validate your writing, it does not invalidate other sorts of writing.
    People do things for reasons, that one does not perceive the reason does not mean that it does not exist, or that they are unthinking, erroneous fools necessarily, more likely that one has some sort of tunnel vision
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  2. #32
    Honoured/Sadly Missed The Backward OX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Olly Buckle View Post
    People do things for reasons, that one does not perceive the reason does not mean that it does not exist, or that they are unthinking, erroneous fools necessarily, more likely that one has some sort of tunnel vision
    But who's the one? The doer or the perceiver?

    Let's say for example someone creates a post. That someone else doesn't perceive the reason for the post doesn't make them an unthinking erroneous fool. But was it the poster or the reader to whom reference was made with the comment "has some sort of tunnel vision"?

  3. #33
    Honoured/Sadly Missed The Backward OX's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by garza View Post
    I spent most of the morning researching case law in Mississippi regarding day for day sentencing to help a young pre-law student at the University of Mississippi. I have membership in sites he cannot access over the weekend, and managed to find five judgements from the Mississippi Supreme Court that he can use. That is what the Internet is for.
    Your argument is specious.

    "Most traditional communications media including telephone, music, film, and television are reshaped or redefined by the Internet, giving birth to new services such as Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) and IPTV. Newspaper, book and other print publishing are adapting to Web site technology, or are reshaped into blogging and web feeds. The Internet has enabled or accelerated new forms of human interactions through instant messaging, Internet forums, and social networking. Online shopping has boomed both for major retail outlets and small artisans and traders. Business-to-business and financial services on the Internet affect supply chains across entire industries."

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  4. #34
    And there was me thinking the internet was primarily conceived as a military communication system on the basis that a net was far more difficult to break than a chain. But the Ox is right, that is only your assessment of its correct and useful function and is a specious as your assessment of fiction as useless, it is a personal opinion based on personal prejudice.

    Ox, my use of "one" was to avoid the personal and particular, to paraphrase, 'when any one in any situation fails to perceive the reason for another's actions it is more likely to be as a result of a failure in perception than to be for a lack of reason', I think the way I start with the failure of perception and continued to the reasons for that failure, added to the fact that I said there always was a reason, made it clear which party I was talking about. I am not sure of the source of your confusion and am tempted to think you are being contentious purely from devilment.
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  5. #35
    Olly - The Internet is for many things. For me its great value is in research and the ability to share that research and share ideas across distances. In a couple of hours yesterday, using electronically indexed sites, I was able to find appropriate examples of case law which would have taken two or three days to find sitting in a law library searching through bound volumes of court decisions. Only another few minutes were needed to send what I had found to Oxford for the student to have for preparation of a paper on day for day sentencing. That's what the Internet is for. That, and many other things for other people.

    The military played a major role in the development of the Internet, but so did universities as well as the privately owned bulletin boards that began to interlink. What a thrill it was to dial up a bulletin board in Lafayette County, then link through to a bulletin board in Tennessee without dialing another number. The military had the money to spend, but the local techies with their homebuilt 8086 servers (can you even imagine an 8086 as a server?) we could reach with our 300 baud modems were, in a way, just as important.

    No style of writing is invalid. All writing, of every style, has value. I have a particular way of writing that has proven to be successful enough for me to, as I say, live 'comfortably' on the proceeds, though certainly not extravagantly. Most journalists are niche writers, and once having found the right niche, tend to stay there. It dosen't mean one person's way of writing is better than another's. It means we each find that market that allows us to write in our own, particular, natural style without having to agonise over the composition of every sentence.

    I don't know where you picked up the idea that I have blinders, that I do not see the value of other styles of writing. I continue to write the way I do because it has worked for me for a very long time. The next fellow has a different style, equally successful, perhaps more successful. He and I write differently. Both styles are valid. Both have value. If every writer wrote the same way, we would all get a great deal of rest because it would be such a damned boring world we'd all go to sleep.

    You mention my habit of writing in absolutes, and that's true. All my life I've dealt with facts without embellishments. If the government convoy was ambushed 12 kilometres northeast of Santa Familia Village, that's a fact. It's not my opinion. I investigate. I go to the site, take pictures, make notes of what I see. I talk to survivors of the convoy. I track down my sources in FMLN and get their account. I put it together and write the story. This is what happened. This is what a government army officer says of the incident. This is what a guerilla leader says. This is what local villagers say. None of my opinion counts, so I can't waffle, as the current political term has it. Any opinion must come from those who took part in the incident, and I quote their words. That's an absolute. This is what they said, the words they used. And here are the words used by someone on the other side. Another absolute. And here is a picture of a burnt-out army truck sitting beside a jungle road. I was there and took the picture. That's an absolute.

    And please find for me anywhere I have said that fiction is useless. I joined this forum for the specific purpose of learning to write fiction. I read a great deal of fiction. I admire greatly those who can write good fiction. I wish I could. Probably I'm far too old to learn, but I do keep trying. If you follow the link to my website you'll see the evidence of that, most, if not all, of which has been previously posted here.
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

  6. #36
    xO - I've just seen your comment, 'Often there's little or no sense in what you've written either'.

    All I can say to that is, 'phooey'.
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by garza View Post
    The endnote would, I should think, be appropriate, provided the full name is important to the story. If you need for the reader to understand the meaning before reading the story, you might do as several science fiction writers have done and create a 'dictionary' reference to go at the top of the story. The fictioners would be better placed, however, to say whether that would be an aid or a distraction. Perhaps Sam W is listening.
    Certainly an aid. When a reader sees that 'dictionary' reference at the beginning, it won't mean anything to them and they'll skip over it. When they come on abbreviations scattered throughout the novel, it provides an alphabetised account of what each one stands for. Much better than having your reader thumb back through the novel to find the one -- and possibly only -- reference to what the acronym stands for. "Did I come on it on page 21 or 41?" You eliminate time wasted on such trivial matters.
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  8. #38
    Without seeing your work, my gut tells me you are right to be concerned about an unexplained acronym in the first paragraph. Acronyms can be very off-putting, and you might scare off your reader before you get them hooked into your story. Is there a way you can reassure your readers that the acronym is not a key piece of the story and that it is OK if the reader ignores it? If the acronym is not important, it should not need a footnote/end note, and the reader will know this by the time they get to the end. But you need to get the reader through the first paragraph. Try posting that first paragraph and see if people can give you any ideas. Why is the acronym necessary in that first paragraph but nowhere else?

  9. #39
    WF Veteran Bilston Blue's Avatar
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    Without seeing your work, my gut tells me you are right to be concerned about an unexplained acronym in the first paragraph. Acronyms can be very off-putting, and you might scare off your reader before you get them hooked into your story. Is there a way you can reassure your readers that the acronym is not a key piece of the story and that it is OK if the reader ignores it? If the acronym is not important, it should not need a footnote/end note, and the reader will know this by the time they get to the end. But you need to get the reader through the first paragraph. Try posting that first paragraph and see if people can give you any ideas. Why is the acronym necessary in that first paragraph but nowhere else?
    Hi C.M

    I think you may be referring to my post, about the acronym in the first paragraph. For the record, I decided against it in the end, and opted for the full title.

    A link for the story, if you're interested, can be found in my signature below this post.

    Scott.
    "I think a life is a plot. It's probably the elementary plot. I came across a quotation of Patrick White, the Australian writer, just about the time I needed it. He said he never bothers with plot. He just writes about life 'limping along toward death.' That made me feel much better, to keep this in my mind."

    Carol Shields.

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