The Use of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Page 2


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Thread: The Use of Abbreviations and Acronyms

  1. #11
    Well, perhaps it was funny in their head.

    Although, now that I think about I have met people who completely abused these acronyms such as "LOL"...putting "LOL" after every sentence for no reason when the subject matter isn't even particularly funny. It's almost like some sort of weird online tick... the way one might use the word "um" or "like" to fill space between the gaps of their speech.

    What's the worst is people who actually use acronyms when speaking out loud. Such as actually saying "L-O-L" instead of laughing. And yes I've actually known people in real life who did this. It bothers me so much!

    Something else that annoys me is when people say something something.com or .net. Like "She is so totally stuckup.com" or "This place is sucky.org". It's just.... ewwww. It might have been funny once, for like one second, but some chick on TV the other day was doing it so much.... like every other sentence.

    The internet is completely re-writing human life as we know it.

  2. #12
    Member Custard's Avatar
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    Well its also to discover what we dont know, including acronyms. Also its to connect people as proven by all the people on this forum.

    Edit- Over using acronyms where they are not needed is obviously over the top and using these in real life just absurd.
    Last edited by Custard; April 17th, 2011 at 07:51 PM.
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  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by garza View Post
    That is what the Internet is for.
    lmfao
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. Steven Wright

  4. #14

  5. #15
    WF Veteran Bilston Blue's Avatar
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    Interesting thread...

    I was about to post a short story which requires the use of an acronym in the first paragraph, though it isn't used again afterwards. I have used the acronym and NOT the full title as it is a mouthful and interrupts the flow of the narrative. I have added an asterisk after the acronym and included the full meaning in small print at the end of the story, like a footnote / endnote would be used in academic work. I had my doubts about this when I started the piece, and am equally uncertain now. Any advice?

    Thanks

    Scott.
    "I think a life is a plot. It's probably the elementary plot. I came across a quotation of Patrick White, the Australian writer, just about the time I needed it. He said he never bothers with plot. He just writes about life 'limping along toward death.' That made me feel much better, to keep this in my mind."

    Carol Shields.

  6. #16
    The endnote would, I should think, be appropriate, provided the full name is important to the story. If you need for the reader to understand the meaning before reading the story, you might do as several science fiction writers have done and create a 'dictionary' reference to go at the top of the story. The fictioners would be better placed, however, to say whether that would be an aid or a distraction. Perhaps Sam W is listening.

    The thought has occurred to me that there may be a disconnect between my use of the Internet and other people's use.
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

  7. #17
    WF Veteran Bilston Blue's Avatar
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    Thanks for your prompt reply Garza. I've just posted the story, and have stuck with the endnote. I may put it at the top if I decide to submit it anywhere.
    "I think a life is a plot. It's probably the elementary plot. I came across a quotation of Patrick White, the Australian writer, just about the time I needed it. He said he never bothers with plot. He just writes about life 'limping along toward death.' That made me feel much better, to keep this in my mind."

    Carol Shields.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by starseed View Post
    Me too. Literally.
    Go and look up 'literally', I very much doubt it starseed.

    garza:- I am not against the principles here but I would pick some nits about their expression if you don't mind.

    "With acronyms, an explanation needs to be provided the first time the acronym is used. Thus on first reference, the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries should be spelt out, followed by its common acronym, MAF, in parentheses. Then on second reference only the acronym need be used."

    Please consider

    "An acronym should be explained in the following form the first time it is used; give the full name followed by the acronym in parentheses. Thus, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries is written 'Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, (MAF)' initially and MAF thereafter.

    I have described the process and given the example, repetition leads to learning, it is simpler and gentler language, compare, 'an explanation needs to be provided' with 'should be explained'. This makes it more acceptable to the reader. There is a tendency to phrase things in an 'official' or 'bombastic' sort of way when we think things important and this is often counter-productive.

    I think the on line community when it uses these things is not necessarily failing in the way you imply garza. Language serves more purpose than the communication of conceptually discreet pieces of information. I would see it more in terms of 'banter'. That is, mutual reassurance within the group by the exchange of shared concepts expressed in the same, repeated, small word groups. Thus continuous LOLs do not mean that the writer literally laughed aloud but are a reassurance that the communication is meant in good humour, quite useful when there is no intonation or emphasis in conversation.

  9. #19
    Having perhaps established now that the emoto-abrievo-acro-iconograph "lmfao" has more in common with things of the sort than with those of the sort OoOUI (Office of Official Usuage Internetae) let me say that my reading of it in the thread referenced above was one of support for the immediatly preceeding post, nuanced by a recognition of an absurd hilarity inherent in the thread topic itself. An understanding not vastly different perhaps than what a comment such as "%$#@*&^!!!" might have evoked but certainly enriched by an understanding of the usages of "lmfao," wherein the deduced support is considerably more directly implied.
    A conclusion is the place where you got tired of thinking. Steven Wright

  10. #20
    Bilston Blue - I'll read your story shortly and offer some comments. Just remember that as a critic of fiction, I'm only a reader, not a writer.

    Olly - Either way would work. Your version is more colloquial and with the repetition very well might make the point better with people who are not professionals. I'm accustomed to using terms such as 'first reference' and 'second reference' along with what you term a 'bombastic' style in talking with editors and other reporters, as well as in the production of reports for government or NGOs. It's how I was talked to as a youngster, standing before the editor of the daily as he slapped the top of his desk in time to such daily lessons as 'precision is essential' before sending me to find an empty desk where i could rewrite my story.

    Some of my language may even be unfamiliar for many, who might think 'second reference' might mean the same as 'second time'. When your version says 'thereafter' it makes clear that the acronym can be used alone on all subsequent mentions.

    There's little or no banter in anything I've ever written, and very often when I see it, even written in a proper language, I fail to get the point. Banter is for Friday night over a stout in the local. While I'm writing I've no time for it. My 'for sale' writing is more colloquial, more like your example, but 'banter' in writing is, like fiction, beyond me. If anything I write is found to be amusing, it's probably an accident.

    Thus it occurs to me that not only is there a disconnect between the way I use the Internet and the way other people use the Internet, there is also a disconnect between my writing on the Internet and the way other people write. Perhaps I believe I'm still filing copy with some grumpy wire service editor in New York. In my day they all had hemorrhoids, ulcers, and bad breath, but they were professionals who knew how to get the best out of every writer, staff or stringer.
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

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