How long does it take you? - Page 2


Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 35

Thread: How long does it take you?

  1. #11
    I sound like a broken record at this point, but I've never outlined a single novel I've written. I also write them linearly. By that, I mean that I write chapter one first and each subsequent one after that. I believe it's the best way to write. I think writing chapter ten now is all well and good, but what happens if, when you get around to writing numbers one through nine, chapter ten does not correlate with them?

    The way I write is rather simplistic. I get an idea for a beginning and I start writing. I often have no idea what the next sentence is going to be, never mind the middle or end. I let the novel sort that out. Believe it or not, you will find that the novel starts telling you to go a different direction that you may have planned. Run with it. Sometimes I write things in chapter five that seem irrelevant, but by chapter eighty I get an idea which ties it in.

    As for NaNo producing sloppy work: Sorry, I don't buy it. Some of the best work I've produced has been done in NaNo-like environments. I once wrote 20,000 words in a day with very little editing required afterwards. There's a belief that NaNo novels are bad because they were written fast. They're not being written fast. 50,000 words in one month amounts to 1,600 a day. My average is 2,000 words in any given writing session. 1,600 words a day does not equate to poor or sloppy writing.
    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

    "One morning I shot an elephant in my pyjamas. How he got into my pyjamas I'll never know." ~ Groucho Marx.

    "It is better to be feared than loved, if one cannot be both". ~ Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince.

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer". ~ Bruce Lee.

    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert's mind there are few". ~ Shunryu Suzuki.

    "Give a man a mask and he will show you his true face". ~ Oscar Wilde.

    "He who learns but does not think is lost; he who thinks but does not learn is in great danger". ~ Confucius.

  2. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    19
    Lots of good advice there, Noa, thank you. One of my blocks has been getting the beginning down, even though I have ideas for other parts of the story, so writing out of order will be a help to me. I don't have the whole story planned out, just a vague theme, but I will start. I have found a program recommended by a poster here to be very helpful. It's yWriter5 yWriter5 - Free novel writing software to help you write a book. You can create your story chapter by chapter, scene by scene, character by character. I'm working on filling in all the scenes so that I have my outline. Then I can go to work on any scene at any time. The program just helps keep everything organized and easily accessible. I think another huge help will be coming to this forum every day. It's encouraging and motivating to hear what others are doing. Thanks again!

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    East Coast, USA
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam W View Post
    I've never outlined a single novel I've written. I write chapter one first and each subsequent one after that.
    That's how I've always thought to write. I can see a benefit to both methods. Writing chapter five might give you ideas for chapter one. Writing out of order would certainly mean lots of changes down the line. I think out of order will be helpful to me when I hit a stumbling block, but know what I want to happen next. I'll have to experiment to see what works for me.

    I need more practice before I'd be ready to try NaNo. Also, I can't help but fear, what if I wrote something great, now I can't use it for publication! Maybe you still could, I don't know how that works.

    Anyway, good to hear from different perspectives, thanks!

  4. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    I am nowhere.
    Posts
    43
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam W View Post
    I sound like a broken record at this point, but I've never outlined a single novel I've written. I also write them linearly. By that, I mean that I write chapter one first and each subsequent one after that.
    Sam, I'm quite jelous of you, I wish I could write a 250,000-word novel linearly. My hat's off to you if you've mastered that style. Although, as to whether or not it is the "best", I really think that's a matter of opinion. I certainly respect your ability, but it is a style, and is not write for everyone.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sam W View Post
    I once wrote 20,000 words in a day with very little editing required afterwards. There's a belief that NaNo novels are bad because they were written fast. They're not being written fast. 50,000 words in one month amounts to 1,600 a day. My average is 2,000 words in any given writing session. 1,600 words a day does not equate to poor or sloppy writing.
    I have also written 20,000 words in a day with very little editing required afterwards. But you and I have been writing for years, we're not beginers. 1,600 words a day is nothing, when I haven't got work to deal with I, too, will average 2,000-2,500. Again: not new, have developed a process.

    The NaNo environment is extremly rushed, it's designed to help new writers build confidence by hammering out a first novel under a deadline, thus proving they have the ability to string together 50,000 words. Some people may write masterpieces like that(I understand A Clockwork Orange was written in just a few weeks), but I'd be willing to wager most begining writers will have a very hard time producing quality work at that pace.

    All I'm saying is, experience makes a difference, and there are many different styles.

    And Blueblade, neat software, I might even have to use it. Anything to stay organized, you know?
    I am no one.

  5. #15
    The ammount I write varies, not depending on how much time I allocate to it but rather whether I get stuck or not. Some days I'll write 1,000 words, some days I'll write a miniscule 100.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by NoaMineo View Post
    Sam, I'm quite jelous of you, I wish I could write a 250,000-word novel linearly. My hat's off to you if you've mastered that style. Although, as to whether or not it is the "best", I really think that's a matter of opinion. I certainly respect your ability, but it is a style, and is not write for everyone.
    Of course. What works best for you may not work the same for me. There are no right or wrongs in writing. If your method is conducive towards creating a novel, then that's the best method for you. Likewise for me. You find your own way of doing it, and if it works you run with it.

    I've had college professors shake their heads at me when I told them I don't plan what to write in an essay. I start off with one point, do a little reading around it, and my other points come to me as I'm writing the first. It's not for everyone. I think you need good self-discipline and patience to keep everything together and seamless. It can become hairy, especially when you write the kind of novels with multiple characters and plot-lines, which I do. But I've been doing it so long that it's become second nature now.

    I have also written 20,000 words in a day with very little editing required afterwards. But you and I have been writing for years, we're not beginers. 1,600 words a day is nothing, when I haven't got work to deal with I, too, will average 2,000-2,500. Again: not new, have developed a process.
    What I will say to Blueblade is this: Don't write for the sake of it. That 20,000-word spree was one of my most productive 'in the zone' moments. It's very rare. It's probably a once-in-a-lifetime occurrence. Before that, 10,000 was my plateau. But I would still rather 2,000 words of solid prose than to try to sacrifice quality to achieve a high word-count for one sitting. I know that sounds like I'm going back on what I said about NaNo, but consider that 20,000 words is almost half a NaNo novel in one day. To produce that amount of words regularly is improbable without sacrificing quality. To achieve 2,000 words of quality is, however, not. It's not about how much you can produce in one sitting, though. Aim for a solid count of 1,000 per day. It sounds like a lot, but in reality it's just 3 6x9 standard novel pages. Do that, and you'll have a 100,000-word novel inside four months.

    The NaNo environment is extremly rushed, it's designed to help new writers build confidence by hammering out a first novel under a deadline, thus proving they have the ability to string together 50,000 words. Some people may write masterpieces like that(I understand A Clockwork Orange was written in just a few weeks), but I'd be willing to wager most begining writers will have a very hard time producing quality work at that pace.
    Perhaps, but I still think it's feasible. And not to throw the cat among the pigeons, but the reality is that you shouldn't be worrying about quality with novel #1. I know -- and will readily admit if asked -- that my first two novels are tripe. They were the learning curve. Mastering novel-writing takes time. I'm on my eleventh right now and it's only in the last few years that I've made any of them available for public consumption. They say you have to write a million words before you get to good stuff, and I think that's a fair assessment. Might be less for others, might be more for some, but the first couple are used to cut your teeth in the whole game. I hope that doesn't dishearten anyone. It doesn't mean that people don't get their first ever novels published, but that it tends to be rare.

    All I'm saying is, experience makes a difference, and there are many different styles.
    I agree. See my above point.
    Hidden Content

    Hidden Content

    "One morning I shot an elephant in my pyjamas. How he got into my pyjamas I'll never know." ~ Groucho Marx.

    "It is better to be feared than loved, if one cannot be both". ~ Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince.

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer". ~ Bruce Lee.

    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert's mind there are few". ~ Shunryu Suzuki.

    "Give a man a mask and he will show you his true face". ~ Oscar Wilde.

    "He who learns but does not think is lost; he who thinks but does not learn is in great danger". ~ Confucius.

  7. #17
    It's really refreshing to hear all of this. Lately I've been a little insecure about my output, which is around 500 to 1000 a day. It bothers me, because back when I was just starting I had written roughly 10000 words in three days. Of course, the difference in quality and consistency is abysmal, but it gets on my nerves sometimes. I'm still a novice, but I now believe that getting your plot right is more important than the output, even if you have to stop and think every few sentences.

  8. #18
    I find I write a little slower as I learn more about writing. My output could be up to 3-5k on a good day in the past. Now I struggle to do 2k. Hopefully as I get used to the skills I'm developing I'll get some speed back. Getting a rough draft done in a month or two would be nice.
    "It's Amazing..."

    Hidden Content

  9. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    The Garden
    Posts
    142
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam W View Post
    I believe it's the best way to write.
    Come now. After calling me out for "must?" I'm just playing though. Many novels I've loved were written as they are read, starting at the start and ending at the end. Then, I've also loved many novels that were meticulously planned and designed.

  10. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    I am nowhere.
    Posts
    43
    I think most novels are probably written out of order, with the author putting all the pieces together as they work. However, I don't actually ave the statistics to back that up, its just how a lot of authors I've met tell me they write. There's no "best" way, obviously, but it works well for impatient hyper people.

    I couldn't find it earlier, but this is the workbook I learned from: Book Details you can kill it in an afternoon and it's insanely helpful. I adopted that process between novels 2 and 3, which is why number 2 took 2 years and number 3 only took 7 months and number 5 took only about 4. I actually know the author personally, and before you smirk at the POD publishing she has a large number of tradditionally-published works, and only put this one out that way to save time.
    I am no one.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.