Prompts and word games chat - Page 3


Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 1234567891011 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 115

Thread: Prompts and word games chat

  1. #21
    WF Veteran SilverMoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Long Island, NY
    Posts
    2,633
    Blog Entries
    1
    Thanks Rob, I was kind of zeoring in on the limerick structures, thinking this might be the place to explore its facets being that this new thread is posted above the Limerick thread. But who knows? They may be being discussed in the Poetry Discussion board, a venue I don't often explore but should.
    “The man who cannot visualize a horse galloping on a tomato is an idiot.”
    Andre Breton

  2. #22
    boo Boo boo boo boo boo boo Booboo
    stuttered the ghost in search of a loo
    but his haunting got hindered

    This is what is currently "in play" compare with a classic limerick.

    There was an old man with a beard
    Who said it is just as I feared
    Two owls and a wren

    For me line two has the wrong rhythm, maybe something like
    An old ghost said in search of a loo,
    With two single syllable words at the start of the line
    Line three looks too long to me, "Haunting was hindered" would make the necessary five syllables.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    Hidden Content

    A thread of links useful to writers wishing to learn
    Piglet's picks. Hidden Content

  3. #23
    Baron
    Guest
    I can understand the odd overlap but there's an instance in the limerick thread where someone picked it up with three previous posts already made and just recycled the same limerick. It isn't even as if it was a case of everyone posting at the same time because there was a half hour time lapse.

  4. #24
    One of ours first

    Getting limericks right may seem easy.
    But it's not, so please try to please me
    With a well thought out word
    and good timing's preferred
    Just try not to make the lines cheesy

    Then a classic one for comparison.

    There was an old man with a beard
    Who said it is just as I feared
    Two owls and a hen
    Three cocks and a wren
    Have all made their nests in my beard

    Then my suggestion,

    Limerick writing may seem easy.
    It isn't, so please try to please me
    A well thought out word
    Good timing's preferred
    Try not to make it too cheesy

    That makes the syllable count 8,8,5,5,8, assuming I have counted right.
    I know, it was me wrote the first line with ten syllables, guilty as any. I plead the idea is to have fun and learn the discipline at the same time so now I am learning.

    Co-incidentally I think losing words such as but, with and and makes for a stronger line.

    The first line still feels clumsy, too many syllables in limerick to fit the rhythm so it needs splitting wri-ting, any suggestions, I was trying not to interfere with the rhyme.
    Last edited by Olly Buckle; November 7th, 2010 at 05:56 PM.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    Hidden Content

    A thread of links useful to writers wishing to learn
    Piglet's picks. Hidden Content

  5. #25
    Baron
    Guest
    Limerick writing seems easy.
    It isn't, so please try to please me
    A well thought out word
    Good timing's preferred
    Try not to make it too cheesy

  6. #26
    Concerning the limerick, the idea is to not only get the syllables, rhyme and word beat emphasis correct but also make each line work with the other, the last line, if possible, a clever or funny punch line that pulls it together. It really isn't that easy to build one, but as I've gotten more into the form I've realized that it each little element of the body of the limerick is important to make it successful. I'm still working on getting it right, and the thread is a lot of fun.
    Question? If the first,second and fifth line have nine beats, how many beats is third and fourth? Still five or can there be six? Any set rules?

  7. #27
    Limericks are all about timing
    along with a fair bit of rhyming.
    The rhymes can be hard
    but have their reward
    when sounding like samples so brilliant.

  8. #28
    Oops...I think I put this in the wrong thread by mistake. Tried not to. Sorry.

  9. #29
    Seems like a reasonable place to me, where would be better?
    How about:-
    Limericks are all about timing
    along with a fair bit of rhyming.
    The rhymes can be hard
    but have their reward
    When the last line rounds off your scheming.

    Apple, as far as I know lines three and four are always five silly bubbles, on the other hand this is a very recent form (in poetry terms recent), look at how the rhyming schemes and such have changed in sonnets over a period of five or six hundred years, and people are still using the old forms alongside the new. I think if you could make it work consistently any form could become accepted, isn't poetry about making it work rather than about rules? Within the limerick thread I encourage people to follow the set forms because that is more about practicing skills than about original creations, the originality comes from the eclectic mix of people contributing, hopefully.
    Visit my website to read and connect to my 'soundcloud', where you can listen to stories songs and more
    Hidden Content

    A thread of links useful to writers wishing to learn
    Piglet's picks. Hidden Content

  10. #30
    I ended with a "non-rhyming" word on purpose. I was thinking "shining" could have been used. It was supposed to begin as an example of a limerick that was, at least, decent, and then end with a word that didn't rhyme, but that was a synonym for the last word. Oh well. My humor didn't pan out, but that's okay, too.

Page 3 of 12 FirstFirst 1234567891011 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
This website uses cookies
We use cookies to store session information to facilitate remembering your login information, to allow you to save website preferences, to personalise content and ads, to provide social media features and to analyse our traffic. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners.