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Thread: Where can I publish my short stories?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Ilasir Maroa View Post
    First, while getting some credits under your belt can be useful, short story credits not all that relevant to getting a novel published. There are (many) exceptions, but my point is, don't write short stories because you think it will help you get a novel deal. A good novel will help you get a novel deal.

    Second, google Duotrope's Digest, which has an enormous listing of web and print publications ranging from free, unpaid markets, up to SFWA-listed professional markets paying 5cents a word or more. (Duotrope lists all genres of publications, but you've specified fantasy.) It has a search feature that lets you sort by genre, rate, title, etc.

    I can't offer you any specific markets for contemorary fantasy without doing something similar to the above, so I'll leave that to you.
    so it's down to me and you again on what role publishing stories can play in your publishing career.

    just to offer a counter opinion to what ilasir is saying, i think the OP is doing the right thing. speaking from personal experience, publishing short stories in reputable places has opened a lot of doors for me. in a perfect world, a good novel would be enough to get you a book deal every time. but its not. other things come into play, which is why its important to stack the deck in your favor. of course, your novel is THE key, but the more doors you have, the better chance you have of that key working.
    Writing cleaner than he lives.

  2. #12
    it should also be said that it's not an either / or situation. work on your novel, while at the same time try to build a CV. the writing is good for you, and when editors / agents ask what kind of platform you have to market yourself, you can say you've been getting your name out there by publishing in X, Y, Z journals.
    Writing cleaner than he lives.

  3. #13
    If your novel isn't good enough, it doesn't matter how many publishing credits you have, Dru. I get your point, but the only thing you need to snag a book deal is a good story that will sell. If I have that and you have a mediocre one but have two dozen short stories published, who do you think they'll go for?

    I'm not saying you shouldn't stack the deck in your favour; just that it isn't a prerequisite.
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  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Sam W View Post
    If your novel isn't good enough, it doesn't matter how many publishing credits you have, Dru. I get your point, but the only thing you need to snag a book deal is a good story that will sell. If I have that and you have a mediocre one but have two dozen short stories published, who do you think they'll go for?

    I'm not saying you shouldn't stack the deck in your favour; just that it isn't a prerequisite.
    honestly, do you really think im suggesting that you write a mediocre novel? jesus christ, man. how about if you and i have good novels, and ive published half a dozen stories in reputable places and you haven't, who do you think they're going to go with?

    again, nobody is saying it's a prerequisite, but you're ill-informed if you think that publishing stories can't be of tremendous benefit to someone shopping a novel. its a different story if you think writing short pieces will somehow transmogrify your novel into shit. in that case, focus on your novel. but if you can handle doing both, it will only help your career. which, i should add, is exactly what the OP was inquiring about.
    Last edited by strangedaze; October 25th, 2010 at 09:21 PM.
    Writing cleaner than he lives.

  5. #15
    I'm sorry, where exactly did I say you said I write a mediocre novel? You're putting words into my mouth, Dru. What I said was: If somebody (no names mentioned here, lest anyone get defensive) writes a mediocre novel with a short-story publishing history behind them, do you really think they will get chosen over someone who writes a cracking story with huge market potential but who has no publishing history whatsoever?

    I also never said that publishing stories is of no benefit. That's more words you're putting into my mouth.
    Hidden Content

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    "One morning I shot an elephant in my pyjamas. How he got into my pyjamas I'll never know." ~ Groucho Marx.

    "It is better to be feared than loved, if one cannot be both". ~ Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince.

    "A wise man can learn more from a foolish question than a fool can learn from a wise answer". ~ Bruce Lee.

    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert's mind there are few". ~ Shunryu Suzuki.

    "Give a man a mask and he will show you his true face". ~ Oscar Wilde.

    "He who learns but does not think is lost; he who thinks but does not learn is in great danger". ~ Confucius.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by FaeryInkPress View Post
    It says we're not accepting submissions, but submit anyway.
    Chizine (Chiascura) would be a great place to be published. According to their entry on Duotrope, they have a 3.66 acceptance ratio. I heard of them well before I started paying attention to Duotrope but they are almost always closed (it seems like). Once it seems like they sent me a useful critique (or was that Shimmer). I don't know, but it would be a good place to get published.
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  7. #17
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    I know that Divertir Publishing does some work with short stories (google them) and that they are currently looking for submissions.

  8. #18
    Raikimii,

    That's the route I went and it didn't help in the way you might think. It gave me insights as to what others (editors) thought of my stories. I learned what editors expect and how to format manuscripts, etc. It taught me to target my submissions and sometimes even write a new story for an upcoming anthology or themed magazine issue.

    But you don't have to start at the lowest rung on the ladder. I tried the top rung first, submitting to Asimov's and other top-of-the-line venues, but I didn't have what it took yet. So I dropped down a level to magazines that pay a few bucks for a story. As far as I'm concerned you're not published if you just let someone put it up for free. I might write an article for a small newsletter or something for free, but never a story.

    Try Ralan's Webstravaganza, where markets are listed by category and sub-categorized by payment. It isn't as complete as Duotrope, but I prefer it. With Duotrope, I have to wade through an alphabetical list with a lot of stuff not interesting to me.

    The best thing about short story publication is that it boosts your confidence and ego. Hell, I'm a lot more obnoxious and boastful than before publication. I still send the occasional short story to the top markets and still haven't broken in, but so what? I remember being doubtful that ANYONE would want to read my writing, much less publish me.

    Same thing with novels. I tried the traditional route, even had an agent for a while. It's HARD to break in. So, instead, after exhausting other means, I've submitted to small publishing houses that don't pay advances, but put up all the costs of publications and they do pay royalties. And I'm sure that, someday, someone influential in the pub business will pick up one of my novels and discover my undeniably great works.

    Now I've got a section of my library with my novels and contributor's copies of the magazines and anthologies I've been included in. It makes me feel good about myself, even if I'm having difficulties in other aspects of life.

    So good luck to you. Don't give it away before giving editors a chance to pay you a few bucks. At the least, stick to print publications where you'll get a contributor's copy for your efforts.

    JohnB
    Last edited by WriterJohnB; November 10th, 2010 at 06:38 PM.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by WriterJohnB View Post
    Raikimii,

    That's the route I went and it didn't help in the way you might think. It gave me insights as to what others (editors) thought of my stories. I learned what editors expect and how to format manuscripts, etc. It taught me to target my submissions and sometimes even write a new story for an upcoming anthology or themed magazine issue.

    But you don't have to start at the lowest rung on the ladder. I tried the top rung first, submitting to Asimov's and other top-of-the-line venues, but I didn't have what it took yet. So I dropped down a level to magazines that pay a few bucks for a story. As far as I'm concerned you're not published if you just let someone put it up for free. I might write an article for a small newsletter or something for free, but never a story.

    Try Ralan's Webstravaganza, where markets are listed by category and sub-categorized by payment. It isn't as complete as Duotrope, but I prefer it. With Duotrope, I have to wade through an alphabetical list with a lot of stuff not interesting to me.

    The best thing about short story publication is that it boosts your confidence and ego. Hell, I'm a lot more obnoxious and boastful than before publication. I still send the occasional short story to the top markets and still haven't broken in, but so what? I remember being doubtful that ANYONE would want to read my writing, much less publish me.

    Same thing with novels. I tried the traditional route, even had an agent for a while. It's HARD to break in. So, instead, after exhausting other means, I've submitted to small publishing houses that don't pay advances, but put up all the costs of publications and they do pay royalties. And I'm sure that, someday, someone influential in the pub business will pick up one of my novels and discover my undeniably great works.

    Now I've got a section of my library with my novels and contributor's copies of the magazines and anthologies I've been included in. It makes me feel good about myself, even if I'm having difficulties in other aspects of life.

    So good luck to you. Don't give it away before giving editors a chance to pay you a few bucks. At the least, stick to print publications where you'll get a contributor's copy for your efforts.

    JohnB
    i like this. great approach. a friend of mine always pisses and moans about how much he gets paid for writing stories. you know, breaking it down to hours and how pathetic such a wage seems. but then, i think about writing the way i think about, say, running, or playing sports, or knitting, or whatever passion you have. really, you'd be doing it anyway. the bread is bonus.
    Writing cleaner than he lives.

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