Software for novelists - Page 4


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Thread: Software for novelists

  1. #31
    rachelthorn - I don't know why you would think non-fiction does not require outlines, background development, and such. Except for rapidly written news flashes, which I seldom do anymore, non-fiction requires careful organisation.

    Lin - I remember trying Notepad++ a few years ago and not finding any advantage in it. Notepad allows you to open as many files as you want. My usual configuration is to have one on the right side of the screen where I'm actually writing, another with my outline, usually uppper left though they tend to get shoved around some, and another with background notes. I'll often write in sections and as I finish a draft for a section I'll push it to the back and open a new file for the next session. If it's a long piece I may end with 10 or 12 files open on the desktop, with only the three in current use showing, the others in the back.

    Notepad is strictly for composing. When I'm satisfied with all sections, I copy them one by one into Word for formatting.

    The problem with a programme like ywriter is you're stuck with what they give you. There is no flexibility. What if you want to look at two or three outline ideas at once? What if you get to section seven and think of a good edit that section 2 needs? You can't just pop it to the front, edit it, and put it back in the back as you can with Notepad.

    But as rachelthorn says, no one system is best for everyone. I want the absolute freedom that Notepad allows. Some people need the built-in rigid structure of a programme like ywriter. To each his own, as the old lady said when she kissed the cow.
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

  2. #32
    Damn, first the sheep, now the cows. Is bestiality the national sport down there in Belize?
    See my books Hidden Content (and in heaven).

  3. #33
    What has really shocked the community is the fact, the undeniable fact, that the old lady kissed the cow and not the bull.

    That sort of thing is simply not accepted here. In public.
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

  4. #34
    One of my main laws in life: when in doubt, grab the one with the biggest tits.
    See my books Hidden Content (and in heaven).

  5. #35
    Yeah, that's a good rule, but let me ask you this. Did you ever try to get a drunk fat woman back into a water bed?
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by garza View Post
    rachelthorn - I don't know why you would think non-fiction does not require outlines, background development, and such. Except for rapidly written news flashes, which I seldom do anymore, non-fiction requires careful organisation.

    The problem with a programme like ywriter is you're stuck with what they give you. There is no flexibility. What if you want to look at two or three outline ideas at once? What if you get to section seven and think of a good edit that section 2 needs? You can't just pop it to the front, edit it, and put it back in the back as you can with Notepad.

    But as rachelthorn says, no one system is best for everyone. I want the absolute freedom that Notepad allows. Some people need the built-in rigid structure of a programme like ywriter. To each his own, as the old lady said when she kissed the cow.
    I think you misunderstood what I was trying to say so I will rephrase. I know that in non-fiction you have to use outlines and such but what I meant was with ywriter its geared towards writing fiction the way that it is set up so that is why I think in my own opinion that it would not be best to write a non-fiction book in because of the way the sections are: characters, scenes, etc. Also you choose what the goal of the scene is with the reaction, dilemma, and outcome per scene.

    It works for me but because of the type of structure you need, ywriter wouldn't be the best software for you to use.

  7. #37
    And please don't think I'm rejecting ywriter on a whim. I have given it a fair trial and found that it felt like I was wrapped in a straight jacket.

    I've started writing some fiction, and find that the same system I use for non-fiction works just as well for fiction. For 'Two Weeks' I had four files open. One for Marty and his mother, one for the story outline, one for some dialogue scraps that I'd thought of, and one for the actual writing. I had a fifth file open for a while with background about Marty's school and his friends. None of that was used in either of the final versions but it helped me keep the character in focus. All of those files are archived so that if I ever want to try that story again all the material is there.

    But as the old lady said...never mind.
    El día ha sido bueno. La noche será larga.

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