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10 ways I found to SAVE $$$ on self-publishing my 2nd book (1 Viewer)

Mikeyboy_esq

Senior Member
My 2nd book (launched recently) includes the DETAILED COSTS of how much I spent to write, self-publish and market (for the first 90 days) my debut book vs. this new one. The difference in how much I spent is staggering! I spent a whopping $7k for my first one as compared to only $1,500 on my second one. I decided to take a hard look at how I spent $ on these two books to see where I found the savings. Below is the list that I came up with (hopefully this will help others save a few pennies whenever they embark on their self-publishing journey).

1) Use a Single Website to Display all Books,
2) Buy Ten ISBN Numbers Rather than Single ISBNs,
3) Shorter Length Books are Cheaper (copyediting costs as an example),
4) Avoid Developmental Edits (if possible),
5) Re-use Author Pic,
6) Choose Vendors Wisely (big variance for some services like book cover design),
7) Avoid using Releases (if possible),
8 ) Give Away eBook/Digital Review Copies rather than Print Copies,
9) Limit Book Contests, and
10) Limit Distribution and Formats.


Now let’s walk through these in more detail:


1.
Use a Single Website: When I selected a domain name for my first book’s website, I didn’t think about future books. In retrospect, it would have been wise for me to pick a website based on my author name and use it to list all of my future books. But I didn’t do that, and later I was faced with the decision of whether to spend another $300 on anew domain name, 3-year webhosting contract and theme package for my second book. To save money, I decided to add new pages to my first book’s website that display my new book and its many benefits. This arrangement seems to work okay.
If my second book becomes a big seller, I may eventually upgrade to a new website for it. Fingers crossed. :excitement:

2. Buy Ten ISBN Numbers: One smart thing I did while creating my firstbook was to buy a pack of ten ISBN numbers instead of buying individual ISBN numbers. The Bowker’s website gives a nice discount for purchasing ISBN numbers in bulk rather than singles. For example, this site currently charges $125 for a single ISBN, or $295 for ten ($29.50 each). Choosing the latter option is a no brainer, especially when you consider that a single book title may require multiple ISBNs (one for hard cover, one for paperback, one for Kindle eBook, one forother brand eBook, plus more for each additional language the book istranslated into). I only used four ISBN numbers for my first book, so I didn’t need to spend additional money to purchase ISBN numbers for my new book.

3. Shorter Length: Many copyeditors charge per word for their service.The price can range anywherefrom 1 cent to 5 cents per word depending on the experience level of the copyeditor, but I found 3 cents per word is the most common price when I shopped around. Lucky for me, my new book is 20k words shorter than my first book and that resulted in about $1k savings on copyediting. Sometimes itpays to shut up! :grin:

*NOTE: The above is only the first part of an article I wrote on this topic. Let me know if anyone wants to see the full FREE article and I'll be happy to tell you where to find it.

Please let me know what you think, or if you have add'l ideas on how to save $$$ while still producing a quality, self-published book.
 
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Jandy

Member
Hi! Did you create a paperback book cover? I know how to make an ebook cover, but would like to try designing my own print book covers. Any advice?
 

Elana91

Senior Member
My 2nd book (launched recently) includes the DETAILED COSTS of how much I spent to write, self-publish and market (for the first 90 days) my debut book vs. this new one. The difference in how much I spent is staggering! I spent a whopping $7k for my first one as compared to only $1,500 on my second one. I decided to take a hard look at how I spent $ on these two books to see where I found the savings. Below is the list that I came up with (hopefully this will help others save a few pennies whenever they embark on their self-publishing journey).

1) Use a Single Website to Display all Books,
2) Buy Ten ISBN Numbers Rather than Single ISBNs,
3) Shorter Length Books are Cheaper (copyediting costs as an example),
4) Avoid Developmental Edits (if possible),
5) Re-use Author Pic,
6) Choose Vendors Wisely (big variance for some services like book cover design),
7) Avoid using Releases (if possible),
8 ) Give Away eBook/Digital Review Copies rather than Print Copies,
9) Limit Book Contests, and
10) Limit Distribution and Formats.


Now let’s walk through these in more detail:


1.
Use a Single Website: When I selected a domain name for my first book’s website, I didn’t think about future books. In retrospect, it would have been wise for me to pick a website based on my author name and use it to list all of my future books. But I didn’t do that, and later I was faced with the decision of whether to spend another $300 on anew domain name, 3-year webhosting contract and theme package for my second book. To save money, I decided to add new pages to my first book’s website that display my new book and its many benefits. This arrangement seems to work okay.
If my second book becomes a big seller, I may eventually upgrade to a new website for it. Fingers crossed. :excitement:

2. Buy Ten ISBN Numbers: One smart thing I did while creating my firstbook was to buy a pack of ten ISBN numbers instead of buying individual ISBN numbers. The Bowker’s website gives a nice discount for purchasing ISBN numbers in bulk rather than singles. For example, this site currently charges $125 for a single ISBN, or $295 for ten ($29.50 each). Choosing the latter option is a no brainer, especially when you consider that a single book title may require multiple ISBNs (one for hard cover, one for paperback, one for Kindle eBook, one forother brand eBook, plus more for each additional language the book istranslated into). I only used four ISBN numbers for my first book, so I didn’t need to spend additional money to purchase ISBN numbers for my new book.

3. Shorter Length: Many copyeditors charge per word for their service.The price can range anywherefrom 1 cent to 5 cents per word depending on the experience level of the copyeditor, but I found 3 cents per word is the most common price when I shopped around. Lucky for me, my new book is 20k words shorter than my first book and that resulted in about $1k savings on copyediting. Sometimes itpays to shut up! :grin:

*NOTE: The above is only the first part of an article I wrote on this topic. Let me know if anyone wants to see the full FREE article and I'll be happy to tell you where to find it.

Please let me know what you think, or if you have add'l ideas on how to save $$$ while still producing a quality, self-published book.

so you know how to self publish?
 

Mikeyboy_esq

Senior Member
Jandy,
No, I didn't make my own cover. One of the tips in my new book (a self-publishing guide) is that you should hire a book cover designer to design your cover unless you happen to already be experienced/talented in that area. If the cover looks sloppy/amateur-ish, most readers will assume the interior is also sloppy/amateur-ish. You can find an experienced vendor to design a quality book cover for around $200-$400. I think I paid $299 for my new book's cover (both eBook and paperback version) from OctagonLab, and I was happy with the result.
 
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Mikeyboy_esq

Senior Member
Hi Elana91,
Yes, I have self-published 2 books in the last 6 months. It's not hard once you know what steps to take. My 2nd book is a self-publishing guide and walks you through the 14 steps I took to self-publish my first book (of course, I used the same steps to self-publish my 2nd book too). Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks.
 
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Elana91

Senior Member
Hi Elana91,
Yes, I have self-published 2 books in the last 6 months. It's not hard once you know what steps to take. My 2nd book is a self-publishing guide and walks you through the 14 steps I took to self-publish my first book (of course, I used the same steps to self-publish my 2nd book too). Please let me know if you have any questions.

Thanks.

Link to these books? I'm looking to self publish!
 

Mikeyboy_esq

Senior Member
Elana91,
Thanks for asking. I don't want to get in trouble by posting links to my books on this forum, but you can easily find them by clicking on the link in my signature (or search for them on Amazon). If you are interested in learning how to self-publish, then I think my 2nd book (14 Steps to Self-Publishing a Book) will help you. Thanks again for your interest in my book and please let me know if you have any questions.
 

who me?

Senior Member
My 2nd book (launched recently) includes the DETAILED COSTS of how much I spent to write, self-publish and market (for the first 90 days) my debut book vs. this new one. The difference in how much I spent is staggering! I spent a whopping $7k for my first one as compared to only $1,500 on my second one. I decided to take a hard look at how I spent $ on these two books to see where I found the savings. Below is the list that I came up with (hopefully this will help others save a few pennies whenever they embark on their self-publishing journey).

1) Use a Single Website to Display all Books,
2) Buy Ten ISBN Numbers Rather than Single ISBNs,
3) Shorter Length Books are Cheaper (copyediting costs as an example),
4) Avoid Developmental Edits (if possible),
5) Re-use Author Pic,
6) Choose Vendors Wisely (big variance for some services like book cover design),
7) Avoid using Releases (if possible),
8 ) Give Away eBook/Digital Review Copies rather than Print Copies,
9) Limit Book Contests, and
10) Limit Distribution and Formats.


Now let’s walk through these in more detail:


1.
Use a Single Website: When I selected a domain name for my first book’s website, I didn’t think about future books. In retrospect, it would have been wise for me to pick a website based on my author name and use it to list all of my future books. But I didn’t do that, and later I was faced with the decision of whether to spend another $300 on anew domain name, 3-year webhosting contract and theme package for my second book. To save money, I decided to add new pages to my first book’s website that display my new book and its many benefits. This arrangement seems to work okay.
If my second book becomes a big seller, I may eventually upgrade to a new website for it. Fingers crossed. :excitement:

2. Buy Ten ISBN Numbers: One smart thing I did while creating my firstbook was to buy a pack of ten ISBN numbers instead of buying individual ISBN numbers. The Bowker’s website gives a nice discount for purchasing ISBN numbers in bulk rather than singles. For example, this site currently charges $125 for a single ISBN, or $295 for ten ($29.50 each). Choosing the latter option is a no brainer, especially when you consider that a single book title may require multiple ISBNs (one for hard cover, one for paperback, one for Kindle eBook, one forother brand eBook, plus more for each additional language the book istranslated into). I only used four ISBN numbers for my first book, so I didn’t need to spend additional money to purchase ISBN numbers for my new book.

3. Shorter Length: Many copyeditors charge per word for their service.The price can range anywherefrom 1 cent to 5 cents per word depending on the experience level of the copyeditor, but I found 3 cents per word is the most common price when I shopped around. Lucky for me, my new book is 20k words shorter than my first book and that resulted in about $1k savings on copyediting. Sometimes itpays to shut up! :grin:

*NOTE: The above is only the first part of an article I wrote on this topic. Let me know if anyone wants to see the full FREE article and I'll be happy to tell you where to find it.

Please let me know what you think, or if you have add'l ideas on how to save $$$ while still producing a quality, self-published book.
=============================


some self publishing gurus said to have a web site for each book , each author, your self publishing company, and be sure to link them all.
your main site could list all the books and link to the separate sites for each book

there was a day when you could get ISBNs for free. i kick myself for procrastinating thinking that would always be the case.

do'H!
the bigger the book the more everything costs. editors, paper, shipping, storage, file transfer fees, yada yada.

if you are not hemingway or rowling, then a development edit for a novel is a virtual must.

make sure you have the rights to use or reuse all graphics if you did not diy them

always get bids before picking any service. prices change especially for book printing.

not sure what you mean by releases
one advantage of ebooks is being to update them as needed

if you want real reviews you will likely have to give away print copies.
but never ever pay for a review.
if you are talking about jump starting sales then do'H! it makes more sense to give away the ebooks.

limiting contests should depend on how well they promote the book or fail to do that

never limit distribution or format except for audio which is not worth the effort and expense.
why limit your market to 40% when you can sell through every major channel worldwide in print and all major ebook formats.
 
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