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I don't know! (langauge)

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So reading Galileo's Dialogue of the Two New Sciences I am lost. It is my least favorite of all the assigned readings. Most of the questions could be bullshitted, but a couple are specific and I can't find the answer. The questions have the page number where the answer can be found, except the online version linked that one can read does not have page numbers. The questions I cannot answer are:

1. Salviati establishes that the path traced by a projectile is parabolic, but Simplicio raises objections based on factors in the real world that are not accounted for in Salviati's demonstration (Day Four, p. 240). What are these difficulties?


2. When Salviati discusses the momenta and the blows or shocks of the projectiles, it reminds Sagredo of a problem he has been unable to solve and which Salviati promises to address at a later time (Day Four, p. 249). What is that problem and what example does he give?


The others are easily BSed as you can see:

3. At what elevation must a canon be shot to reach the maximum range (Day Four, p. 252)?
It seems the highest because assuming the force applied to the ball is equal and the angle of attack of the cannon is equal at both heights, then the higher the elevation of the canon, the further the ball will shoot. This is because of gravity since a higher object takes longer to fall.

4. Why do you think that Galileo chose the dialogue as the form for what is fundamentally a scientific work? Think back on the Socratic dialogues. What are the advantages of the dialogue for an author making an argument? Are there additional advantages when an argument is being made in a particularly difficult political climate?
The dialogue method allows a more human means of preventing the information. Also the question method allows the reader to understand the matter better because it is not being presented “all at once” in a technical manner, but little by little, in a conversational manner. As for the advantages in a difficult political climate, like that which Galileo was in with the Church, there seems to be none really. The dialogue method might allow for Galileo to be more discreet, and allow therefore for a reasonable doubt argument in court, but upon the whole he still makes the argument, and so will still anger his enemies.

5. Galileo made major contributions to both theoretical and applied science, but probably his most well known contributions were the discoveries of new planets and their motions that he made through the use of the telescope. Think about what science knows today or, to make it more difficult, think about what it does not know. What new invention or discovery can you imagine that would have a similar effect? Recall, that most discoveries depend upon gathering old information in ways that make possible new creations. Think creatively on this one!

The discovery of nuclear radiation. It has allowed for much advance in science, including medicine. It has also allowed for many evils, like the atomic bomb.



I might just leave them blank. Hey, I might even put "I don't know" but I think that might come off bad, so I will leave them blank. I can always do extra credit.

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  1. Smith's Avatar
    Can you Ctrl + F the document and try to search for the specified passages that way?

    By the way, the art of bullshitting questions is something I have a Masters Degree in, and thank God for that. ;P

    ^ Don't know how anybody gets through school without it, quite frankly.
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