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  1. escorial's Avatar
    Being a teenager in the late 70's n 80's was a time when many different music movements were around an all had there following..punks,mods,new romantics,skins,rockabilly...a time when independent labels came about...think the buzzcocks we're the first inde band with a top twenty hit
  2. RhythmOvPain's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Winston
    We're different generations, I think. The Ramones were fun but overrated. The Clash was awesome, you just gotta dig past their pop "successes".
    I love the Offspring. "Self Esteem" is a 90's slacker theme track.

    The folk-punk of Flogging Molly and the Dropkick Murphys is outrageous.

    Now my faves are The Dead Kenedys, Black Flag and Circle Jerks. As a musician, I can understand you looking down your guitar neck at their musical rifts. But their counter-cultural rages are epic. One lesser known jem from the Circle Jerks is "Making the Bombs", a scathing anti-war culture ditty, Even the over played DK "Holliday in Cambodia" is a powerful social face slap to a smug, post Vietnam US. And Black Flag's "TV Party" parodies the idiocy of middle class America. It's all in the lyrics.
    what do you think of Andrew W.K.?
  3. Kevin's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Smith
    Does Rage Against the Machine count for anything?
    everything is influenced by something, right? Definitely the snarl, and the 'activism'.
    At the time it as all corporate softies. There was just radio. And then this thing started happening. It was only at live shows and we got bootleg tapes. Parents were freaking out...again. Omg-lookitjunior! Wasnt til the 90's - 'grunge' that anything similar got played nationally. Before that it was all polished. A lot of listeners couldn't relate ( on both sides).
  4. Kevin's Avatar
    I was on a remodel many years ago that was the guitarist for Bad Religion's wife's divorce-pad. 40 mil was the settlement sum mentioned. I think offspring was n a fight with him at the time- he ( gurwitz) was the label. 40 mil is not punk. Haha. 'Fashion'...
  5. H.Brown's Avatar
    Aww guys, Greenday is kinda like my favourite band of all time, I wouldn't say they usurped punk. But Winston you are correct punk was more than fashion, it was a way for the working class to reject the ideals that had been placed upon them from a government that they had lost faith in. Thatcher had incised the miners strikes which, left a lot of Northern England with out jobs or a way of providing and slipped the country into a state of welfare dependency. There was the Falklands war which caused more unrest. All of these social tensions which to the young of the 70's and 80's was unfair and somewhere along the lines Punk was born to reflect the social/economic times of hardship and unrest. It was a changing time for England, not only in fashion and music but also in how youth was seen.
  6. bdcharles's Avatar
    I’m a Cardiacs man myself. I don’t even know what musical genre they are. A bastard child of punk and punk’s arch-nemesis, prog-rock, with a marked absurdist bent thrown in, it's the sort of noise you hear when the patients raid the face-paints cupboard and break into the music room.
  7. Smith's Avatar
    Does Rage Against the Machine count for anything?
  8. Winston's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by RhythmOvPain
    In all honesty, and as a musician, I have respect for very few punk bands.

    I mean Blondie was technically punk, and I'm a fan. I like some of Rancid's early work.

    The Misfits and Samhain were meh to me, but I love Glen's work as an artist.

    I never liked The Ramones or The Clash, or The Destroyers, or anything like ghat for some reason.

    I DO like Green Day. Tré Cool is a fucking beast on the early albums, and the music/vocals are excellent on a lot of their first songs (until International Superhits), but they went commercial by Warning.

    Hell, I like The Offspring.

    My punk style is more David Brockie (early GWAR).

    ALTHOUGH, David Brockie JUST died of a heroin overdose. =x
    We're different generations, I think. The Ramones were fun but overrated. The Clash was awesome, you just gotta dig past their pop "successes".
    I love the Offspring. "Self Esteem" is a 90's slacker theme track.

    The folk-punk of Flogging Molly and the Dropkick Murphys is outrageous.

    Now my faves are The Dead Kenedys, Black Flag and Circle Jerks. As a musician, I can understand you looking down your guitar neck at their musical rifts. But their counter-cultural rages are epic. One lesser known jem from the Circle Jerks is "Making the Bombs", a scathing anti-war culture ditty, Even the over played DK "Holliday in Cambodia" is a powerful social face slap to a smug, post Vietnam US. And Black Flag's "TV Party" parodies the idiocy of middle class America. It's all in the lyrics.
  9. RhythmOvPain's Avatar
    In all honesty, and as a musician, I have respect for very few punk bands.

    I mean Blondie was technically punk, and I'm a fan. I like some of Rancid's early work.

    The Misfits and Samhain were meh to me, but I love Glen's work as an artist.

    I never liked The Ramones or The Clash, or The Destroyers, or anything like ghat for some reason.

    I DO like Green Day. Tré Cool is a fucking beast on the early albums, and the music/vocals are excellent on a lot of their first songs (until International Superhits), but they went commercial by Warning.

    Hell, I like The Offspring.

    My punk style is more David Brockie (early GWAR).

    ALTHOUGH, David Brockie JUST died of a heroin overdose. =x
  10. Smith's Avatar
    I grew up on pop-punk. Sum-41, blink-182. I'm not a fan of Green Day either.
  11. kaminoshiyo's Avatar
    I see where you’re coming from but I think there’s a lot wrong with what you said.

    You can blame millenials, but you might as well throw all of us in with them. We all contribute to the problems- we just think we don’t. You don’t think so and the people you point to won’t think so. That’s the biggest problem. No one takes responsiblity for the part they contribute to the problem. (me included)

    I don’t make a blanket criticism of veterans, but the organization they serve is pretty messed up and if you knowingly serve that organization, same goes to you. Our wars tend not to be very honorable and simply because people decide to risk their lives for a cause doesn’t make them hinkrable or sacred or beyond criticism or consequence. Criminals sacrIfice their lives. So do terrorists. I’ve seen pretty bad military personnel give that spiel about serving as if it were some sort of martyr card. While I understand the individual servicemen can have opinions different from the overall organisation and can even be victims of it doesn’t really vindicate them completely. If I were an hinest priest that knowingly served a pedophile Bishop, how honest an I? Thing is honor, courage, and comitment isn’t much but words if you can’t fight the evil wherever it is rather than the one you ordered to fight.
  12. Smith's Avatar
    In terms of Huxley and Orwell, I think it's reasonable that Huxley leads to Orwell. They're both right in their respective ways.

    I respect veterans. I have my disagreements with our foreign policy, our military industrial complex, etc., but I separate it from the veterans. Last week I saw 12 Years Strong with my dad and I actually thought it was a good movie.

    Not all millennials are as you describe, but most of them are. In our defense, many of us may not know how to work on cars, but we can work on a computer. It actually blew my mind when I realized that the discussions our fathers would have as they stand around a car admiring the engine, or trying to fix something on the car, are similar to how all my friends will stand around a computer and admire the casing, the watercooling, the SLI, the processor.

    "What are your specs?"

    List some badass, top of the line graphics cards, motherboard, etc. Then everybody wants you to boot that thing up and see what it can do. Launch one of the most graphics intensive games you can think of and everybody will be amazed, in the same way that you can take your buddies for a drive in your awesome new car.

    Many millennials are familiar with the construction of a computer and how it all "works", to some extent. Maybe not familiar down to the lines of code and binary, but still. And I've modified my version of Skyrim with graphical mods, patches that fix problems with the game- that is conceptually similar, in my opinion, to modifying your car with decals or installing nitrous.
  13. midnightpoet's Avatar
    Veterans, I've known a few; my two brothers, Jack and Doug. One fought after D-day, the other was an MP in Germany after surrender. My friend Tommy, in Korea after the war. He often talked about his exploits. "Old man" Uranga across the alley - Vietnam vet, spent time in a tiger cage before he escaped. Smoked himself to death. So many stories , too few real heroes anymore.
  14. midnightpoet's Avatar
    Having worked in more than one warehouse, I can relate. The last several years I worked as a purchasing manager of a small electric supply house; fortunately it wasn't always dull. As I was in charge of inventory I was back there a lot, and a lot of times had to show the employees where to find stuff (our system wasn't exactly state of the art). The warehouse supervisors usually weren't much help. I swear they got one at a homeless shelter - in any case he smelled.

    I was in charge of annual inventory - which usually drove me nuts. They fed us well though - we'd get bbq, or fried catfish/chicken with all the usual fixings.

    The owner had a fixation on "stuff." If it didn't move for several years, count it anyway. We had whole sections of stuff he finally wrote off but still wouldn't get rid of it. I tried several times to sell it, best I could get was 10 cents on the dollar. Not good enough. We did have some "characters" but no one as crazy as the owner.
  15. kaminoshiyo's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by RhythmOvPain
    Working out is something that's meant to be taken seriously.

    I know a few professional fighters. One said that exercise is the same thing as sex to him. All of them and their peers frequently go to the same gym at 6 A.M. every morning.

    Even my regular friends throughout the years understood the value of a routine.

    I fell off like many, but when I was hard at work with the weights I was definitely waaaay stronger than I am now.

    Years of work will go away in months if you don't take care of yourself.

    One of my girls a few years back was a competitive swimmer. All she ever did was crunch 100 times every night before bed and swim laps every weekend, and she had a fucking six pack.
    I know that feeling, lol. You have to really work out for it, to the point where your muscles feel boiled, but you get a really good feel from it all.
  16. Winston's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by RhythmOvPain
    Working out is something that's meant to be taken seriously.

    I know a few professional fighters. One said that exercise is the same thing as sex to him...
    Yeah. Good analogy. Full effort or why bother.

    Unless your Chauncey Gardiner. Then it's okay to just watch.
  17. RhythmOvPain's Avatar
    Working out is something that's meant to be taken seriously.

    I know a few professional fighters. One said that exercise is the same thing as sex to him. All of them and their peers frequently go to the same gym at 6 A.M. every morning.

    Even my regular friends throughout the years understood the value of a routine.

    I fell off like many, but when I was hard at work with the weights I was definitely waaaay stronger than I am now.

    Years of work will go away in months if you don't take care of yourself.

    One of my girls a few years back was a competitive swimmer. All she ever did was crunch 100 times every night before bed and swim laps every weekend, and she had a fucking six pack.
  18. dither's Avatar
    A few years back I was seeing Chiropractor because of back problems, caused, it would seem by the truck I was driving at the time. I say that because when I changed jobs my back problems disappeared.
    Anyway, my point is;

    He advised me to do two twenty minute walks per day walking fast enough to get a sweat on, meaning, that when I'd worked up a sweat not to ease of and keep walking at that pace for a good twenty mins. Not only would it aid my joints but it was also a good cardio work out. Strictly speaking, I am slightly over-weight but it's not a problem and, considering my age, I couldn't wish to be in better condition physically.

    dither...

    Or should that be... don't dither?
    Updated January 15th, 2018 at 04:12 PM by dither
  19. sas's Avatar
    Each year, always in November...before we travel in December to see his mother, and two months before his annual physical, my partner runs like a madman on our treadmill, sets a timer to walk in intervals, and measures out his alcohol. He loses some poundage. He is morbidly obese. I no longer applaud his efforts. I've witnessed this for two decades. Then it's back to same ol' same ol' about March. Everyone, I guess, chooses their own bullet. I accept my plunge, accidentally (smiles), off a Colorado cliff climbing. I hope not to be terrified, so I can have one last look out at real heaven.
  20. sas's Avatar
    dither,

    That was the first remarkably sensible perspective I've ever heard you express. Stay on that wave length.
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