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  1. bdcharles's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Pulse
    I may be idiosyncratic, buit every time I read through the text, I imagine I am a reader, seeing it for the first time because most readers will be.

    On the first edit, it is worthwhile pointing out where the story is not in sequential order. Many writers want to use flashbacks or even flashforwards; but it helps if the writer and editor can agree a way through these issues so they are both on an agreed wavelength.

    A lot of the editorial work I do is for writers whose original manuscript was in a different language, so we often resort to metaphor when the precise translation sounds awkward or does not express the image.

    The most important thing for me is to clear my head of prior versions of the text and read it afresh.
    When short of time, I try all sorts of ways to acquire fresh perspective: ranging from closing one eye, not using my glasses, or having a couple of glasses of wine beforehand, to doing something totally random just before I get started, like crawling under my desk and lying there for a minute, thinking about my MS (or the point in it I am reviewing).

    Honestly, I would gladly stop doing it in a heartbeat - if only it didn't work.
  2. Chris Stevenson's Avatar
    Very thoughtful comments from the both of you. It is so very hard for me to see my words as a reader and I know this must be done. I will occasionally slip into that distant-sight mode and actually catch just about everything. Most often not. I think editors have that natural born or developed sense to spot something, however minuscule and out of place, very rapidly and without difficulty. I can't tell you how many times I've gone over the same manuscript with multiple passes only to continually find more errors.

    The foreword in my newest released book had 13 blatant errors in it that both I and the editor missed. I had to do a fast triage on it, and then get it replaced with the printed version on Amazon. Neither I or my editor were aware that it went to print in such a fashion. Blessed be the editors.

    BTW, after 30 years in trade publishing, I have just now learned to let the damn manuscript sit for a good length of time before diving back into it. This has Always been my biggest mistake. I'm practicing restraint and patience now.
  3. Pulse's Avatar
    I may be idiosyncratic, buit every time I read through the text, I imagine I am a reader, seeing it for the first time because most readers will be.

    On the first edit, it is worthwhile pointing out where the story is not in sequential order. Many writers want to use flashbacks or even flashforwards; but it helps if the writer and editor can agree a way through these issues so they are both on an agreed wavelength.

    A lot of the editorial work I do is for writers whose original manuscript was in a different language, so we often resort to metaphor when the precise translation sounds awkward or does not express the image.

    The most important thing for me is to clear my head of prior versions of the text and read it afresh.
  4. bdcharles's Avatar
    For me, when I edit other peoples' novels I primarily try and get a feel for the voice they want to have, the way they imagine the book to sound. Sometimes I will let a grammar slip stay, if by including it the text would acquire a bit too much repetition or some other flow weirdness in that area. And I do approach it from a readers' perspective too, absolutely. I do find that writers have certain crutches they lean on, whether it is a word or a writing type. For eg., the guy I am currently working with tends to rely on loads and loads of unassigned dialogue, so I have to piece together who's saying what, and also give it a bit more externality, less talking-headsiness. But generally the people I edit for are happy; they seem to accept the changes and like them, and if they push back, which isn't really all that often, I usually let them keep the bits they want if the agitate enough. It is definitely a group effort.
  5. Chris Stevenson's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Stygian
    What is the distinction between young adult and regular adult books. Is it the writing prose, or is it specifically the characters in the novel being kids/teens/adults? I was thinking of just writing a story and trying to classify it afterwords, but it seems it would make more sense to do the reverse.
    You know, I would say it was the content more than an age factor. Adult books can approach adult subjects that might be considered appropriate for a younger audience. Specifically, murder, sex, liquor, drugs and the more hard-edged subjects. YA can certainly explore these subjects and circumstances, but it must be done with more tact. I think moral turpitude is examined more in YA lit than adult, or even NA for that matter.
  6. Chris Stevenson's Avatar
    Quote Originally Posted by Plasticweld
    Chris, you ad an interesting perspective to YA writing. You are in reality, a stranger in a strange land. I have never been able to relate to the genre, I grew up fast, knowing my faith, religion and values were at a young age. People have always said that they changed a lot from the teen years to adulthood. I am the same boring person now, as I was then. The real benefit is that some of those opinions and thoughts that I voiced as a teenager and were never well received, yet those same views from a cranky old guy seem just fine.

    Thanks for sharing a little slice of your world...Bob
    Thanks Bob, glad you took something away from it.
  7. Plasticweld's Avatar
    Chris, you ad an interesting perspective to YA writing. You are in reality, a stranger in a strange land. I have never been able to relate to the genre, I grew up fast, knowing my faith, religion and values were at a young age. People have always said that they changed a lot from the teen years to adulthood. I am the same boring person now, as I was then. The real benefit is that some of those opinions and thoughts that I voiced as a teenager and were never well received, yet those same views from a cranky old guy seem just fine.

    Thanks for sharing a little slice of your world...Bob
  8. Chris Stevenson's Avatar
    Pardon, but that darn Happy face blew up to that size and I can't figure out why! Ha! That looks foolish.
  9. Stygian's Avatar
    Thanks, I'll do some more googling on the matter. I feel that if I write a story with a sufficiently high body count, or some serious psychological element, it would be better for an adult audience. Then again, the hunger games is based off of Battle Royal (Translated Japanese novel), which had a massive body count. I never read the former, but the latter was pretty messed up for a teen to read. Mind you I was glued to the book when I read it in my 20's
  10. Chris Stevenson's Avatar
    Hi, Stygian. Generally speaking, the reading audience for YA stories and books is from 12 to 18 year-olds, and it is written in a voice or style befitting the way teenagers communicate. Not to say that it is stereotypical, but that the language, or narrative and dialogue, is not so highbrow or complicated. You can Google YA voice/style and get a good perception of it, or better yet, read a lot of YA books, both spec fiction and contemporary to get a more accurate fix on it.
  11. Stygian's Avatar
    What is the distinction between young adult and regular adult books. Is it the writing prose, or is it specifically the characters in the novel being kids/teens/adults? I was thinking of just writing a story and trying to classify it afterwords, but it seems it would make more sense to do the reverse.
  12. Chris Stevenson's Avatar
    Hi, Kaminoshiyo, and thanks for your comments. The special services that Amazon implants are high dollar deductions for the reader and Amazon itself. The author is forced to comply with Amazon special publishing services that make it exclusive. I'm a hybrid author, just one book out of ten, but I haven't seen any significant sales on that one either. It is not the writing and publishing of books that is hard today, but making any sales whatsoever is nearly impossible and getting worse. There is now, ie the article, more books that can ever be read. The pool is already diluted. Literature is at risk. Three years ago the industry was hopeful and proclaimed that audio books would pull us out of it. Guess who the major audio distributor is.
  13. kaminoshiyo's Avatar
    Interesting. I remembered reading about this promotion of indie authors by Amazon, but got cold feet. Not just because I had to pay, but I was paying into a service offered to as many as would take it. In a field where you have to fight for recognition, if exposure is offered to a thousand other writers like yourself, are you really getting a special service?

    Thanks for posting this.
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