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Natural force and tool usage

A new thing is not always grand.

For instance, did you know that one tool may be used for, or like another tool? I'm sure you do, or have -like a screwdriver that you used as a chisel, or the handle of as a hammer - not that is just wrong ( because it ruins the tool), but it s common.

There are, however, some improper usages that for the most part I can't think of, but some of which may come involuntarilly.

I learned of such yesterday.

The retractable blade utility knife may, depending upon materials, be used as a hatchet; with a chopping motion.

Now, a hatchet is not for slicing, though there are cleavers which might do both, given usage, etc., but typically, the razor-knife, as it commonly known, is not built for such, having a thin blade, not meant for striking.

That is unless the material with which you are working - cutting at- something soft yet pliable, and perhaps with a fibrous consistency, like vinyl roofing , or similar ( as I said) , applying enough pressure- force- to cut through while slicing said material... until there is a sudden give, whereby, uexpectatedly- with 'mouse-trap' or snapping motion, then blade passes through and comes down upon/ cleaves-into one's thumbnail, precisely cutting, separating it into two, vertically ( longitudally).

Mmm...such precision, and with minimal penetration of the softer tissues below; apparently...

This action I did perform, indeed unexpectedly, and suddenly ( being a snapping 'chop'), which did elicite redness, fluid, as it were, as well as fluid, streaming curse-words.

Dammit, man...be more careful. That's easy for you to say, explicit expletive in a loud manner, I repeated, repeatedly, little old lady neighborhood ears be damned or cursed upon.

Comments

My Dad was a mechanic. My father-in-law was a wood-worker. But I fell away from the fold.

I joined a bunch of miscreants that were a bad influence.
One of our favorite sayings was "There is no problem so large that a sufficient amount of explosives won't solve it."

And I swore a lot back in the day, too. Hell, who am I shitting? I still do.
Just rub some dirt in your boo-boo and carry on.
 
I whacked off the tip of my finger some time back using a veggie slicer. I lived through it. We all do some stupid things regardless of intelligence - for example there was this limb, a chain saw and a ladder. Boing, boing, crash. :thumbr: Hang in there, guy.
 
Turns out it's not so bad- luckily- no fault or control of mine. The nail is cut right in half, yes, but it doesn't hurt, hasn't bled; isn't falling off. Often digit injuries keep on giving...pain and blood and such daily. like every time you have to dig into your pocket. So as far as inconvenience or whatever my last one before this where I bounced a screw gun tip out of a screw head and right through my pinky nail at full force, well that one was way worse after. I kept bumping the damned thing for a week. Come to think of it that nail was split in half also except the other way ( crossways), so maybe one more time and I'll be done with it, you know, 3 being a charm . Anyway. I hope this didn't come across too much as whining. More or less I just wanted to share. Like if I ever get bit in half by a shark or something I figure you might want to know lwhat it's like- what to expect, just maybe in case...
 

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