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Firemajic
May 1st, 2019, 10:13 PM
Why... that's the question... why... whys drive me crrrrrazzzy... my why is this... Why write poetry... why??? I know hundreds... maybe even thousands of people, people who have passed through my life, some life long friends and a huge family... but the weird thing is... they don't feel the burning desire to write a poem... I find that so intriguing... and kinda ... sad... Why? Why don't they write poems.... I mean... how can they not...

I know why I write... my beloved GrandMam started reading poetry to me at the age of 2... I fell in love with the sound of her voice as she read and I fell in love with the beautiful rhythm, ebb and flow of the poems she read... and I fell in love with the "Raggedy Man"... and I cried over "The Wreck of The Hesperus"....

Later, I turned to poetry, as a way to express things that were happening to me, and that was how I survived, reading and writing poetry, losing myself in the beauty of the words as I read poetry to escape my world... writing poetry probably saved my life..

Often I write just because I love words... I will hear a phrase or a line in a song and my mind kicks into POETRY MODE... and then I am DRIVEN to write... for me, it is almost a primal urge... and it can NOT be ignored...

But most do not feel the urge to write their thoughts, moods, emotions or anything else, in a poem...

So my question is WHY do YOU write poetry....why... why why why....

PiP
May 1st, 2019, 10:58 PM
Good question, Fire. For me writing poetry is like an itch that needs to be scratched. I don't itch ALL the time so I only scratch as and when the itch demands.... which is often. Words flow onto the paper - a stream of consciousness.

Poetry can be result of a random thought, emotions, visual prompts, sounds etc. For example, the other evening I was writing to an online friend and I was feeling extremely sad. I am in a lot of pain which means I can no longer walk very far and the op I had back in January to cure the problem only made matters worse.

I was crying with frustration and despair as I wrote the email. My art teacher and friends think I'm always happy and positive because I laugh a lot and am always smiling despite my disability...My online friend can't see me. This prompted me to pen a poem about a clown. It's a little cliched 'the tears of a clown' but I don't care. The poem was a release valve as the tears became ink.

RHPeat
May 1st, 2019, 11:53 PM
Not everyone should write poetry but most everyone should learn to read a poem now and then.

Being Committed
cuts a board, swings a hammer,
drives a nail, to do its chore.

It is the labor, won and lost
given freely to our inspirations,
for any art-form, every kind:
music, painting, drama, poetry;
whatever the ghoul may be
standing in the inflamed archway.
It's a spin chosen by life-style.

Just a choice between
feeling alive or feeling dead
as life's breath. It chooses
to know the intimate moment
in raindrop and snowflake

It's like blowing your nose,
tying your shoes in the dark,
kissing your lover goodbye
hugging your grand-children
for no reason at all,
changing the diaper on
baby's dirty dandy butt.
Poetry holds your final word.

It's how you cook the beans in
a cast iron pot on a gas stove –
with one or two ham hocks.
It's that simple selection
of ingredients that's used, so
important to flavor the stew.

It is a choice, a dedication
to live a life without question
not in submission, but admission.
It's not exclusive; it's inclusive.

Poetry liberates acceptance
that our small planet lives
and breathes. Forested Mother,
blue-marble afloat in space,
spinning on its magnetic core,
whirling in its elliptical orbit,
drawn toward the sun's light;
it uplifts our being in awe,
awakening pulse, life's melody.

Evoked now we wish to sing
to fields filled with butterflies,
to bob cat's growl & coyote's howl.
This why you want to listen
to chirping morning music,
and to feel the shower spray
sprinkling summer's body cool.

Poetry is life and death in
every breath. Changing as we
grow; it celebrates being alive:
our freedom bound to it
like a rooted redwood giant.

A poet friend
© RH Peat 5/1/2019

Bard_Daniel
May 2nd, 2019, 01:53 AM
Poetry, and writing, becomes a manifestation of my thoughts, memories, and (above all) feelings. It's a passion, and one that is extremely therapeutic. It allows me to take everything inside of me and put it into words for someone to read.

I think poetry is so important. It's incredible, soulful, and liberating to write.

It is freedom from the world, if but for a while...

ArrowInTheBowOfTheLord
May 2nd, 2019, 04:08 AM
Anything that I write/draw/create is for the purpose of sharing a story, real or imaginary. Poetry as a medium is both my first instinct and last resort. Before I write a story, usually I'll have written a couple poems about the characters first. And if I am frustrated by every other method of storytelling, I will use poetry.

Darren White
May 2nd, 2019, 05:51 AM
It's simple for me:

Because I have to, it's my only means of expression and communication.

But after that initial need, I have to chisel and etch, add and delete, move around and shape, and make it as artsy as I possibly can :)

TL Murphy
May 2nd, 2019, 05:52 AM
I write poetry to liberate the hidden parts of my mind and to share that liberation with whomever wishes to hear it. I believe it can set us both free. Not everyone understands that through music, art and poetry, you can become much more than who you are and you can inspire others to do the same. It's remarkable that most people resist it. I don't really understand why, unless it's because they want the hidden parts of their minds to remain hidden. They must be afraid of what it may reveal to them. I think we could solve most of the problems in the world if everyone wrote poetry. John Lennon pretty much had it figured out. But then, he also had a lot of money.

Firemajic
May 2nd, 2019, 11:03 AM
Good question, Fire. For me writing poetry is like an itch that needs to be scratched. I don't itch ALL the time so I only scratch as and when the itch demands.... which is often. Words flow onto the paper - a stream of consciousness.

Poetry can be result of a random thought, emotions, visual prompts, sounds etc. For example, the other evening I was writing to an online friend and I was feeling extremely sad. I am in a lot of pain which means I can no longer walk very far and the op I had back in January to cure the problem only made matters worse.

I was crying with frustration and despair as I wrote the email. My art teacher and friends think I'm always happy and positive because I laugh a lot and am always smiling despite my disability...My online friend can't see me. This prompted me to pen a poem about a clown. It's a little cliched 'the tears of a clown' but I don't care. The poem was a release valve as the tears became ink.


Dear PiP, first allow me to say how sorry I am for what you are going through... and I think that pretending to be cheerful and happy... smiling when you want to weep makes one feel even more alone and isolated... I love that you said your tears become ink... and I laughed when you said writing was an "itch that needed scratched".... thank you for sharing your thoughts with me...




Poetry, and writing, becomes a manifestation of my thoughts, memories, and (above all) feelings. It's a passion, and one that is extremely therapeutic. It allows me to take everything inside of me and put it into words for someone to read.

I think poetry is so important. It's incredible, soulful, and liberating to write.

It is freedom from the world, if but for a while...


"Writing becomes a manifestation of my thoughts, memories and [above all] feelings"
"Freedom from the world, if just for awhile".... yes! Beautifully said, thank you ...




Anything that I write/draw/create is for the purpose of sharing a story, real or imaginary. Poetry as a medium is both my first instinct and last resort. Before I write a story, usually I'll have written a couple poems about the characters first. And if I am frustrated by every other method of storytelling, I will use poetry.

I find that very interesting... poetry is a distilled, intense version of a story... yes? Thank you ;)



It's simple for me:

Because I have to, it's my only means of expression and communication.

But after that initial need, I have to chisel and etch, add and delete, move around and shape, and make it as artsy as I possibly can :)


Yes, Poetry does help express our emotions, and for me when I write a poem, I can kinda be "removed" from those emotions... if that makes any sense... :) thank you...




I write poetry to liberate the hidden parts of my mind and to share that liberation with whomever wishes to hear it. I believe it can set us both free. Not everyone understands that through music, art and poetry, you can become much more than who you are and you can inspire others to do the same. It's remarkable that most people resist it. I don't really understand why, unless it's because they want the hidden parts of their minds to remain hidden. They must be afraid of what it may reveal to them. I think we could solve most of the problems in the world if everyone wrote poetry. John Lennon pretty much had it figured out. But then, he also had a lot of money.


"I write poetry to liberate the hidden parts of my mind"..... there.... yes... that... To liberate the hidden parts of my mind..... wow... that is POWERFUL... I am going to be thinking about this for a long, long time... Thank you for sharing... This is a fabulous quote and I am going to put it where I can see it every day and especially on those days when I try to explain why I write , to someone who will never understand...

Firemajic
May 2nd, 2019, 11:20 AM
Not everyone should write poetry but most everyone should learn to read a poem now and then.

Being Committed
swings a hammer, cuts a board,
drives a nail, to do its chore.

It is the labor, won and lost
given freely to our inspirations,
for any art-form, every kind:
music, painting, drama, poetry;
whatever the ghoul may be
standing inflamed at the archway.
It's a spin chosen by life-style.

Just a choice between
feeling alive or feeling dead
as life's breath. It choses
to know the intimate moment
of raindrop and snowflake

It's like blowing your nose,
tying your shoes in the dark,
kissing your lover goodbye
hugging your grand-children
for no reason at all,
changing the diaper on
baby's dirty dandy butt.
Poetry holds your final word.

It's how you cook the beans in
a cast iron pot on a gas stove Ė
with one or two ham hocks.
It's that simple selection
of ingredients that's used, so
important to flavor the stew.

It is a choice, a commitment
to live a life without question
not in submission, but admission.
It's not exclusive; it's inclusive.

Poetry liberates acceptance
that our small planet lives
and breathes. Forested Mother,
blue-marble afloat in space,
spinning on its magnetic core
whirling in its elliptical orbit
drawn toward the sun's light;
it uplifts our being in awe,
awakening pulse, life's melody.

Evoked now we wish to sing
to fields filled with butterflies,
to bob cat's growl & coyote's howl.
This why you want to listen
to chirping morning music,
and to feel the shower spray
sprinkling summer's body cool.

Poetry is life and death in
every breath. Changing as we
grow; it celebrates being alive:
your freedom bound to it
like a rooted redwood giant.

A poet friend
© RH Peat 5/1/2019


Okk now... THIS is why I READ poetry... and why poetry is my passion! The first 2 stanzas really resonated with me... this is a fierce poem... and the last 2 lines... killer!

Darkkin
May 2nd, 2019, 12:03 PM
My words talk so I don't have to. Yet people become so absorbed in finding the profundity of the metaphors they miss the obvious. No one hears because they are too busy talking over each other, but something was said. Not a fair test, I will admit, but it does give one a decent indication of what others' actions and attitudes are like.

I don't talk over the top of other, my words don't stand out. If someone hears, listens I make an effort not to disappear back into the wall because they heard (read) something that resonated through the din of life. I read much, much more than I write and words form the lenses through which I view the world.

Just some thoughts.

- D.

Firemajic
May 2nd, 2019, 12:15 PM
My words talk so I don't have to. Yet people become so absorbed in finding the profundity of the metaphors they miss the obvious.*** No one hears because they are too busy talking over each other***, but something was said. Not a fair test, I will admit, but it does give one a decent indication of what others' actions and attitudes are like.

Just some thoughts.

- D.


Once a friend told me that she loved our conversations and I was so easy to talk to, and I thought to myself... I did not really say anything, I just listened... maybe poetry is like getting to speak, without being interrupted ....

Darren White
May 2nd, 2019, 12:22 PM
I have physical problems with speech
So yes for me that's a truth. Being able to speak without being interrupted. I like that :)

Gumby
May 2nd, 2019, 01:22 PM
My words talk so I don't have to. Yet people become so absorbed in finding the profundity of the metaphors they miss the obvious.

I know that you say you don't write in metaphor, at least I think that is what you have said, but for me, your work is full of metaphorical profundity. :) I like to find the meaning behind the meaning because it is like feeling a moment of enlightenment, the penny dropping, a connection to humanity and compassion. Whether you mean to infuse your work with this or not, I do still find it there and appreciate what it gives to me.



I don't talk over the top of other, my words don't stand out. If someone hears, listens I make an effort not to disappear back into the wall because they heard (read) something that resonated through the din of life.

That's nice to hear. You've a lot to say in your own way and style that is worth hearing.

midnightpoet
May 2nd, 2019, 01:58 PM
Why do i write? I never have been good at oral communication, probably in part because of my hearing defect.
Why do I write poetry? That's more complicated, I must have some innate talent that may be partly genetic. Beyond that, poetry has been in my head most of my life, and I can't help but to write it down. Words come to me in verse form, and rhyming words pop into my head easily. I'm a storyteller at heart, probably why I like song lyrics that tell stories and why I like narrative poetry. It's a medium as old as human speech, as stories told around a campfire about mammoth hunts, heroes and monsters - and in my most dark moments has given me the strength to overcome my own fears and doubts.

Bard_Daniel
May 2nd, 2019, 03:15 PM
I read much, much more than I write and words form the lenses through which I view the world.- D.

Yes! I completely agree with this and do the same, but this is exquisitely said as well.

You have great things to share with with your writing, Darkkin. I agree with Gumby, whether intended or not, your work seems so layered and full of metaphor and allusion. Your connection with humankind, the grace, and your imagery fuses with your creative intensity to bring your works to life.

And Firemajic, I love the feeling of profound emotion that echoes through your work. There's so much feeling in there that it becomes attached to the poetry like a coat of arms. I really like that. You allow your heart to resonate and seep through your words to the reader's soul. At least, that is how I see it.

This is a good topic! :D

SilverMoon
May 2nd, 2019, 09:54 PM
Why do I write poetry?

When people ask me what I do, I jest and tell them I’m a perspiring writer. But there’s truth in this. I sweat out poems. The words and spaces in between fall from every sore pore that’s felt life’s frost. I suppose you could say that sometimes I feel like a broken refrigerator. But this is good. I never want to be ripe, completed.

I write to strip language of its tapestry for the decorative hides the bare bones of authenticity. I also like the challenge of precision.

For me, the cloth of poetry should be burlap. It ought to be uncomfortable. When you take it off, it still stays with you. It should be the space in between lace, little gateways to mysteries.

Poetry is “code” for what could be epic revealing. In this, there can be danger and regret.

I write in hope that at least one person can say “I know that thing, that person”.

........................There’s so much else I could say. But I would have to turn it all into a poem

Outsider
May 2nd, 2019, 10:46 PM
I think we could solve most of the problems in the world if everyone wrote poetry.[/SIZE]

Just look at the posts on poetry on this site. I don't think anything is being solved.

Angalfaria
June 19th, 2019, 07:59 AM
Not everyone should write poetry but most everyone should learn to read a poem now and then.

Being Committed
cuts a board, swings a hammer,
drives a nail, to do its chore.

It is the labor, won and lost
given freely to our inspirations,
for any art-form, every kind:
music, painting, drama, poetry;
whatever the ghoul may be
standing in the inflamed archway.
It's a spin chosen by life-style.

Just a choice between
feeling alive or feeling dead
as life's breath. It chooses
to know the intimate moment
in raindrop and snowflake

It's like blowing your nose,
tying your shoes in the dark,
kissing your lover goodbye
hugging your grand-children
for no reason at all,
changing the diaper on
baby's dirty dandy butt.
Poetry holds your final word.

It's how you cook the beans in
a cast iron pot on a gas stove Ė
with one or two ham hocks.
It's that simple selection
of ingredients that's used, so
important to flavor the stew.

It is a choice, a dedication
to live a life without question
not in submission, but admission.
It's not exclusive; it's inclusive.

Poetry liberates acceptance
that our small planet lives
and breathes. Forested Mother,
blue-marble afloat in space,
spinning on its magnetic core,
whirling in its elliptical orbit,
drawn toward the sun's light;
it uplifts our being in awe,
awakening pulse, life's melody.

Evoked now we wish to sing
to fields filled with butterflies,
to bob cat's growl & coyote's howl.
This why you want to listen
to chirping morning music,
and to feel the shower spray
sprinkling summer's body cool.

Poetry is life and death in
every breath. Changing as we
grow; it celebrates being alive:
our freedom bound to it
like a rooted redwood giant.

A poet friend
© RH Peat 5/1/2019
I have no experience of writing a poet but I love to read it.
Thanks for sharing a beautiful poetry.

Jp
May 22nd, 2020, 01:45 PM
I can only relate what writing poetry is to me and where the desire comes from. I am not your most likely to write poetry. For most of my youth and into my 20's I had rode dirt bikes extremely hard. From the time I was 5 years old I had became more and more daring, up until the point that I was riding freestyle motocross. Doing back-flips and the like for me was a form of expression, one I still love today. It was a fateful day when I found my buddy Tyler under my bike in mid air and I made a decision to save his life. I turned my bike sideways in the air to clear his head, but could not right myself in time. I ended up splitting my helmet in two and having a lot of swelling in my brain. That swelling must have affected my ability to form complete sentences. I would struggle to get out the words that I could easily form in my head and it was a nightmarish thing. In my suffering, which is suffered mostly alone, I searched for something that would help me express what I was still able to think. One day I picked up my grandpa's copy of W.B. Yeats and randomly flipped to "A Dialogue of Self and Soul," and that is how it started. And then I tried and tried and tried again, and I am still doing it today.

Irwin
May 22nd, 2020, 05:03 PM
They can take
my paint,
my clay,
my guitar,
and my camera.
But they can't take
my words.

TL Murphy
May 22nd, 2020, 06:33 PM
Just look at the posts on poetry on this site. I don't think anything is being solved.


I beg to differ.

Outsider
May 22nd, 2020, 09:29 PM
I beg to differ.

You've solved the pandemic? The economic recession were in? Climate change? Are all these problems in that minority that you don't include in "most"?

TL Murphy
May 22nd, 2020, 10:48 PM
Not at all. But poetry raises consciousness and writing poetry raises consciousness, even if these are incremental steps. I believe that art makes the world a better, richer, safer place. That's why tyrants suppress it. It doesn't solve all problems all at once and of course there are always new problems. But writing poetry changes the world by changing the poet.

clark
May 23rd, 2020, 05:05 AM
The words/concepts "problems" and "solutions" are so often misunderstood. The starving child, all bones and protruding belly is not the "problem" nor is the bowl of nutritious gruel it's given to ease back into food the "solution", however welcome for that individual child. The "problem" is the consciousness of the society that failed to produce conditions that would have ensured such a condition never existed. Altering the consciousness of the culture is the only way to solve the problem . . .and poetry, narratives, stories that embody the best of the culture in words that can shock the culture into heightened awareness of their identity and potential, that is the key. Baby steps, for sure. First, the poets achieve that sense of fusion within themselves, second, epiphanies in their readers/hearers impact the culture in small ways that grow into broader paths. All cultures know this. At any given moment in any culture, the statements of account, engineering specs for mega projects, clandestine notes between royal lovers, shopping lists for major parties--all of these declarative, functional, task-oriented documents were HUGELY more important to keep the gears moving than any poem of the day. But ALL of those functional documents quickly became dust as the currency of their issues were passed and gone. What survives then? From every culture, down thru time . . . .their poetry. Not by accident. By necessity.

Irwin
May 23rd, 2020, 07:10 AM
Not at all. But poetry raises consciousness and writing poetry raises consciousness, even if these are incremental steps. I believe that art makes the world a better, richer, safer place. That's why tyrants suppress it. It doesn't solve all problems all at once and of course there are always new problems. But writing poetry changes the world by changing the poet.

That's a good way to put it. It does change the poet and makes one look at the world differently by increasing awareness, which is not necessarily a good thing when you don't like what you see, and in the current state of America, there's a lot not to like.

A97
August 20th, 2020, 06:27 AM
I donít really have a vast experience of writing poetry but Iíve always been interested in and longed to do it however my confidence and ability is very low (which Iím trying to improve on). But I find poetry so interesting and wish to write it because I find beauty in words and thatís it. I wish I had a really in depth meaningful answer but I just find the concept of words beautiful and remarkable.