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Firemajic
February 24th, 2018, 09:34 PM
So, I recently picked up a paint brush...and watercolors.... what a trip! I am trying to understand that watercolor painting is water... and a tiny bit of paint... then waiting until the paint dries... then more water and a tiny bit of paint...I am loving it....

PiP
February 24th, 2018, 09:59 PM
Amazing, Juls!

I particularly love the way you've captured this critter.

https://www.writingforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=20893&stc=1&thumb=1&d=1519504242

Firemajic
February 24th, 2018, 10:05 PM
Amazing, Juls!

I particularly love the way you've captured this critter.

https://www.writingforums.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=20893&stc=1&thumb=1&d=1519504242



lol... he is my favorite.. I am getting ready to do him in green and blue.... I am glad you liked him ... thank you ;)

PiP
February 24th, 2018, 10:08 PM
You have such a delicate touch, Fire. Love the way you've caught the glint in his eye as it has really brought the subject to life. One day I will unearth my paints...

Gumby
February 24th, 2018, 10:25 PM
Just lovely, Juls! They are all great.

sas
February 24th, 2018, 10:29 PM
I can't believe you are a beginner. Really? Nice!

Firemajic
February 24th, 2018, 10:35 PM
Thank you Gumby ;)

Sas... I do a lot of drawings, and I use colored pencils... but I have always been intimidated by a paint brush... but while in Oklahoma, I was bored, and so I bought a cheap watercolor set and I always carry a sketch pad... so.... I started painting, and I am hooked!

TuesdayEve
February 25th, 2018, 05:37 AM
Really nice work Fire. Also you’ve captured that
dejected feeling in the little wasp...no stinger.

escorial
February 25th, 2018, 09:49 AM
Nice pair...the first bug the pose is brilliant...the other one the wash is very delicatly dun..it's a tuff medium with very little room for error...great work

Firemajic
February 25th, 2018, 04:37 PM
Thank you, Tuesday ;)

Escorial... thank you... it means a lot, coming from you, as you know, I am a fan of your work ;)

Here are a couple of new fly pics... paint splatters were added to the blue fly for texture...

escorial
February 25th, 2018, 05:23 PM
Your choice of subject is so interesting....the colors bring such realism to the subject..esp the wings...it's like they are as still as a fly can be or in flight which is fantastic...top stuff

Firemajic
February 25th, 2018, 05:40 PM
LOL.... yeah, I realizzzzze not to many people paint flizzzes! But I wanted to practice my control of the brush, water and paint... and I was working on adding detail... Escorial, do you wait for your first wash to dry completely, before adding more color, or do you work on damp paper..????

escorial
February 25th, 2018, 05:56 PM
I use watercolours an acrylic so I can control dark n light..I only dampen the paper to stretch it onto a board..it doesn't stop the paper lifting completely but once the paint has dried it goes flat on the board again... watercolor requires a certain speed..do you prefer that or would you like longer...

Firemajic
February 25th, 2018, 06:07 PM
Hummmm.... I don't know... I am used to colored pencils, but once I put down too much color, the wax in the pencils builds up, and the tooth of the paper won't take any more color... so, I think I am going to like watercolor better, because I can keep going back and adding color... but my real problems are knowing how much water to use, on the brush, and knowing when to STOP and be done with the picture... I keep messing with it until I ruin it....

escorial
February 25th, 2018, 06:51 PM
Watercolor is very restrictive in building up and returning to a work...to work from light to dark shade is not easy and because of this alot of works will end up in the bin..water on the brush is subjective but if you want to mix a wash then use a more detailed stroke for detail I would suggest a hairdryer to dry the wash and then apply the darker detail...Edward bura worked ostensibly with watercolour an Turner's watercolor are amazing..

TKent
February 25th, 2018, 06:59 PM
WOW! Fire, these are brilliant. Hardest medium I ever attempted. Could be my lack of patience in letting things dry... I adore these! BTW think about you pretty much every day as I have your acorn in the window at my kitchen sink and it is so beautiful.

Firemajic
February 25th, 2018, 07:13 PM
Watercolor is very restrictive in building up and returning to a work...to work from light to dark shade is not easy and because of this alot of works will end up in the bin..water on the brush is subjective but if you want to mix a wash then use a more detailed stroke for detail I would suggest a hairdryer to dry the wash and then apply the darker detail...Edward bura worked ostensibly with watercolour an Turner's watercolor are amazing..


I see... you have been very helpful, thank you so much, and I will check out the artist you suggested ... ;)




WOW! Fire, these are brilliant. Hardest medium I ever attempted. Could be my lack of patience in letting things dry... I adore these! BTW think about you pretty much every day as I have your acorn in the window at my kitchen sink and it is so beautiful.

Thank you! I am having a blast... I am so pleased that you love your glass acorn and oak leaf.... I don't know if you have house plants, but I make beautiful beads on a long wire stem, to put in house plants... I call them potted plant jewelry... I also make berries and leaves on long stiff wire to put in plants... they are beautiful... I would be happy to send you a couple.. if you have plants ;)

Below is a cobalt blue fantasy flower on a wire stem, it is decoration for a potted plant, they are like sun catchers, and really make a house plant beautiful...

TKent
February 25th, 2018, 08:45 PM
What a cool idea!!!

LeeC
February 26th, 2018, 04:17 AM
Great work Fire. You've a real artists eye :-)

SilverMoon
February 26th, 2018, 06:18 AM
You are a Natural! Just beginning to work the with most difficult media out there and creating these awesome images?! I've always worked from light to dark simply because it allows me some time as to decide where I'm going to go next with it. It doesn't have to be an overly rushed process.

A few tips I learned along the way:

Watercolor work is basically indelible. What you paint is what you get. However you can get around it if you need to eliminate a little spill or a tiny, nagging error.

Let it dry naturally then scratch the area very lightly with an Exacto blade (preferable) or a small parring knife will do. Once dry, you can lightly stroke area with paint.

When I go for a bleed, I just angle the paper slowly in preferred directions then let it dry. You can also lightly blow on it. I think a hair dryer would work if you are creating a very large piece. I work small so have never used it.

I've used "Winsor and Newton" watercolour paint for professionals. I'd go straight to it because your work is of professional quality. They're expensive so you might want to stick with your basic colour wheel. (they offer tons of hues you don't need - you can create your own on pallet)

Paper quality is an important choice to your approach and subject matter.

Here's a link I found for you:

https://www.artistsnetwork.com/art-mediums/watercolor/understanding-the-different-grades-of-watercolor-paper/ (https://www.artistsnetwork.com/art-mediums/watercolor/understanding-the-different-grades-of-watercolor-paper/)

Juls, I know that excitement when first starting out. I am so happy you've discoverd yet another gift!

Firemajic
February 26th, 2018, 09:35 PM
Great work Fire. You've a real artists eye :-)


Awww, thanks, Lee... that mean a lot coming from you.. ;)




You are a Natural! Just beginning to work the with most difficult media out there and creating these awesome images?! I've always worked from light to dark simply because it allows me some time as to decide where I'm going to go next with it. It doesn't have to be an overly rushed process.

A few tips I learned along the way:

Watercolor work is basically indelible. What you paint is what you get. However you can get around it if you need to eliminate a little spill or a tiny, nagging error.

Let it dry naturally then scratch the area very lightly with an Exacto blade (preferable) or a small parring knife will do. Once dry, you can lightly stroke area with paint.

When I go for a bleed, I just angle the paper slowly in preferred directions then let it dry. You can also lightly blow on it. I think a hair dryer would work if you are creating a very large piece. I work small so have never used it.

I've used "Winsor and Newton" watercolour paint for professionals. I'd go straight to it because your work is of professional quality. They're expensive so you might want to stick with your basic colour wheel. (they offer tons of hues you don't need - you can create your own on pallet)

Paper quality is an important choice to your approach and subject matter.

Here's a link I found for you:

https://www.artistsnetwork.com/art-mediums/watercolor/understanding-the-different-grades-of-watercolor-paper/ (https://www.artistsnetwork.com/art-mediums/watercolor/understanding-the-different-grades-of-watercolor-paper/)

Juls, I know that excitement when first starting out. I am so happy you've discoverd yet another gift!


Wow, all of your tips and tricks are wonderful, I need all the advice I can get... It will be a while before I purchase any expensive paint, brushes and paper... I need a lot more practice... knowing how wet to have the paper is a big problem, and knowing when to STOP is almost impossible... I will write down your tips about what kind of paint and paper to try, thank you... ;)