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Matt Styles Illistrada
April 27th, 2017, 07:07 AM
I’ll admit it, I am crazy, but not every person deserves to go to the mad house. Mad and not the crazy house because I’m a little of both. I don’t try to kill myself, not because I’m a cowered but because I am sane, sane to a point of mentality. In another way, you can say I have a split personality as well, but don’t get me wrong; I have thought of death as a way out but felt that I was the one that was going to get cheated out of.

They say people that are mad and crazy at the same time have crazy ideas, I’m not sure if that’s true. What I can tell you is that every time that I’ve had an idea, I would just try to memorize it to the best point until I’ve forgotten it. Not on purposely but because not everyone can remember what they ate the first day of the childhood life, unless there is a special meaning to it.

As of July 24, 2011, I have decided to log my ideas on to paper and look back at everything that when through my head, not for fame, fortune, or glory, but for personal gain. I want to leave a mark and tell the world that for a moment, I was here. In your eyes, it may seem that I do want fame, but can there be a notice person that has no fame?

This question has been driving me mad for a long time and I have decided that you, the reader, should be the judge of that.

MadMickyG
May 1st, 2017, 02:58 AM
I understand what you are saying, as I think similarly. Many stories I've written come from strange ideas or thoughts I've had, that grow in to what they are.

I too want to let the world know I was here. Many of us do I guess.

There's plenty of people who'll judge you. It may not always be in a positive sense. But you have to do what you think you should, within reason of course.

Good luck to you and hope you achieve a touch of clarity writing it all down. :)

Jay Greenstein
May 1st, 2017, 04:55 AM
My view? Dump it. It accomplishes nothing useful. The reader is seeking a story, and that happens in real time. Once upon a time, books began with a letter from the protagonist to the reader, like this. It was the style. And when that was done the story, itself, was 100% narrative, with the protagonist talking to the reader, and only a line of dialog here and there to illustrate a point.

But then along came film, then TV which has the power to place the viewer into the scene in a way the printed word cannot. Film involves vision and sound, which are parallel senses. A glance and we know who's in the scene, how they're dressed, and what's going on. And that pretty well killed it for the style of storytelling in which the narrator lists events, people, and setting, one item at a time. In defense, writers found a new way, a more exciting way. They took the reader where film and TV can't, into the mind of the protagonist. And with those new techniques they made the story just as real for the reader as film is for the viewer.

But there is a small problem. You have to learn those tricks in order to use them, because as Mark Twain observed, “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”They're not hard t learn, but they must be learned.Another point to note: The reader gets none of the emotion you hear as you read this, and that matters to how they perceive the words—a lot. Have your computer read it aloud and you'll hear the problem.

Firemajic
May 1st, 2017, 12:57 PM
Hello, Matt...Your story intrigues me...Our mind is our only truly private place, where we are free to think and form our own perceptions of who and what we are. I have been called "weird" my entire life, because of the way I see the world, people and emotions. Many times I have asked " who is the judge of what is normal and what is not".... how do we really know what is "normal"? We are not privy to other people's innermost, secret thoughts and opinions. I learned early on to keep these thoughts to myself, because I was labeled a "freak" and "weird"...
Anyway, I hope you keep writing, I would love a honest, unedited peek into someone else's private space... You could write this like a private journal... ;)

Bard_Daniel
May 2nd, 2017, 03:55 AM
In writing this prologue you set up your work appropriately. It's nice and short and I feel it could belong.

Just my two cents! Keep on writing!

Matt Styles Illistrada
May 2nd, 2017, 06:39 AM
My view? Dump it. It accomplishes nothing useful. The reader is seeking a story, and that happens in real time. Once upon a time, books began with a letter from the protagonist to the reader, like this. It was the style. And when that was done the story, itself, was 100% narrative, with the protagonist talking to the reader, and only a line of dialog here and there to illustrate a point.

But then along came film, then TV which has the power to place the viewer into the scene in a way the printed word cannot. Film involves vision and sound, which are parallel senses. A glance and we know who's in the scene, how they're dressed, and what's going on. And that pretty well killed it for the style of storytelling in which the narrator lists events, people, and setting, one item at a time. In defense, writers found a new way, a more exciting way. They took the reader where film and TV can't, into the mind of the protagonist. And with those new techniques they made the story just as real for the reader as film is for the viewer.

But there is a small problem. You have to learn those tricks in order to use them, because as Mark Twain observed, “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”They're not hard t learn, but they must be learned.Another point to note: The reader gets none of the emotion you hear as you read this, and that matters to how they perceive the words—a lot. Have your computer read it aloud and you'll hear the problem.

Thank you for your feed back, I actually got a great idea now how to go with this, don't think it's ever been done before so will need to experiment with it


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

JustRob
May 18th, 2017, 12:42 PM
You have me intrigued, not maybe by what you have already written but more by the possibilities of where you might take it. At present that is open-ended, which is fine for a prologue. Jay may be right that trends regarding prologues have changed, but there are no hard and fast rules and it's not what you do but how that has the impact ultimately. I wrote a prologue to my novel but called it chapter one and represented the reader with a surrogate character, whom I then incorporated into the story as a real character later. Anyone who wanted a prologue could then read the first chapter as though it were one, but that was a complicated solution of the kind that I personally enjoy devising.

The distinction between "mad" and "crazy" appears singificant to you but you do not explain it, which makes the message confusing. There's an old joke about an inmate of a madhouse telling a visitor how to do something and when asked why he is there when he is evidently so clever he simply answers, "I'm mad, not stupid." I've been there myself, literally in a mental hospital, not through being irrational but through being, shall we say, temporarily out of alignment with society's current expectations. I do wonder whether it is the existence of society that has created the whole concept of madness. For example, one of my fellow inmates was there simply because he was homosexual. It was a long time ago, of course. "Mad, but not stupid" I understand, but "mad, not crazy" or the converse I need help with and would expect some clue within your prologue.

I've done the notional suicide thing as a mental exercise as well, saying to myself that if I have notionally killed the person that I don't want to be then, rather than wasting the rest of my life, I am free to make of it what I want to. Well, the logic of it convinced me at the time anyway. Hyperrationality, or maybe it's ultrarationality, can either lead to behaviour that society endorses or that it doesn't. That's because society itself collectively may have a flawed character, expecting particular proportions of conformance and divergence for no particular reason.

Why July 24, 2011 in particular? Does that just give your story a convenient timespan to cover? I am curious because at that precise time I was myself responding to a critique of an extract from my draft novel sent to me by a professional reader, as it happens. I never understood why I took it into my mind to, as you say, "log my ideas on to paper" during that year, never having had any intention to become a writer, and I have been searching for the answer ever since. For me it was equally a matter of personal discovery rather than a desire to be noticed, my submission to that professional reader having been just a spin-off act out of curiosity.

Your final remark about being driven mad by your own lack of comprehension does at least suggest that you use the word "mad" to imply annoyance rather than irrationality, which helps if true.

Yes, this is interesting, to me at least. It has potential.